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This book does what it sets out to do it explores the opportunities and challenges facing women in science and technology, math and medicine, from grade school to grad school and beyond but less through what I would have described as extensive research and muchthrough the scores of interviews that make up the bulk of this slim book That said, there s nothing wrong with the interviews, or with the accumulated evidence conveyed that sexism is alive and rampant everywhere we care to l This book does what it sets out to do it explores the opportunities and challenges facing women in science and technology, math and medicine, from grade school to grad school and beyond but less through what I would have described as extensive research and muchthrough the scores of interviews that make up the bulk of this slim book That said, there s nothing wrong with the interviews, or with the accumulated evidence conveyed that sexism is alive and rampant everywhere we care to look However, the I felt that Hall underproved her particular point about sexism being science and tech specific The prejudices that many of the interviewed women have had to overcome or ignore often appear to me, reading between the lines, to indicategeneralized misogyny While that always absolutely deserves to be challenged, exposed, and expunged, I caught myself feeling disappointed that the book seemed to be veering slightly off itsfocused brief I wanted three things from this book 1 An academic or at least a pop science pr cis on how women s and men s brains actually differ and what implications that does or does not have for aptitude and success We get one chapter that tries to do this, but it was deeply unsatisfying Hall spends most of her time very briefly describing studies that show undramatic results sideline that s actually an unfair criticism because most studies are undramatic and therefore boring, and often science like this never gets published at all because surprising results are what attracts journal readers, so we re all artificially skewed to look for thrilling outliers Anyway, spoiler generalizations are unhelpful, as aptitude varies greatly among both women and men, but there is no evidence that gender specific neurological differences prevent women from excelling in scientific fields Unfortunately, this hastily shoved in chapter fails to make its point very clearly, and readers could be forgiven if they forget it was even in the book at all 2 An investigation into the up and down history of women s inclusion in and exclusion from specific fields, with cultural and sociological analysis We do get a little of this, but only through the explorations of specific anecdotes I would have liked to seenumbers for both the US and for other countries, and an explication of the trends 3 Practical, actionable advice on how to support women in science, math, and tech careers and encourage girls to see them as available and welcoming from a young age This, the book delivers in the last two chapters and the appendix, which is quite thoughtful You do have to make it through all the anecdotes to get there, but it s worth it Recently, I went to see Mae Jemison speak at the Commonwealth Club Her talk had nothing to do with this book, but she did cover similar themes Listening to her speak for an hour was easily twenty times as inspiring as reading this book, so I want to record here some of the insights that she shared All of the following quotes are paraphrased Everyone needs to be scientifically literate to get through the day We need to read the news, understand the evidence, and make good decisions We know that part of how you interpret results depends on who you are and that is why the diversity of the people looking at those results is so important In response to a question about how teachers can best support women and minorities in science Know your age group and guide them well Twelve to sixteen year olds want to be independent and push right up to the edge but not fall over Teachers need to be trained to do the right kind of creative and hands on work that fits that age group Not to discount rote memorization For anatomy you really do need to memorize ALL of those bones You do not want your doctor to have to go look something up while treating you Note Jemison s disregard for gender or race in her answer teachers need the same training to encourage everyone and set them up for success, regardless of these extraneous factors An aside, back to something that annoyed me in Hall s book Hall suggested that weed out courses are unfriendly to women and that they should somehow be eliminated I protest with fervor Women are perfectly capable of excelling in weed out courses, provided they are prepared to expect them and trained to study effectively within them and the same goes for men We need those courses to ensure we aren t handing out technical degrees to people unwilling to put in the hard hours to master complex content Women do not need to be babied, and thus women do not required that the entire yes, flawed education system be rearranged to make them feel personally supported at all times The number of times I sighed during Hall s critique of this and other university practices adjunct assignments, tenure, etc is uncountable Those systematic problems have much less to do with women in the sciences than they do with our underfunded educational system and our lack of honesty about how it really works Aside over, back to Mae Jemison now Today s industry is deeply reliant upon basic scientific research that was conducted 30 to 50 years ago Corporations that are using this research should recognize its value and support basic scientific research for the future We should all remind others that recent innovations and discoveries have a basis in a long history and tradition In answer to a question from a student interested in working for her 100 years starship program who wanted to know what she should study to best further its goals This project s goal is for us to have the capability, within 100 years, to get humans to another star In order to accomplish this, we need significant advances in a variety of fields propulsion, obviously, as our closest star is 4.2 light years away, so we d have to travel at near light speed to get there within 100 years microbiology, because we are a swimming mass of organisms and we need to deal with and replenish that AND not wipe out or be wiped out by what we encounter where we are going materials, as this spaceship needs to be radiation tolerant and extremely long lasting navigation, because precision matters at such distances and speeds communication, because how will we handle that human behavior, as sending humans off on a journey of no return in a confined space is bound to attract some problems, given that we are all of us on a spectrum of dysfunction So this is why we need people from all walks of life and varying backgrounds to create that future We need math, science, philosophy, and writers to write both fiction and non fiction to tell the story and inspire us onward The most important thing to come of all this would be for us to see ourselves as Earthlings with a shared story and a shared future Not everyone can be 1 but everyone can be excellent In fact, even if you are 1 at something, it doesn t necessarily mean you are pushing yourself You have choices about what to do with your time So make excellent choices I think that s a fitting close for my 2016 reading and sets an excellent tone for the year to come I was generally disappointed with this book The author focuses most on the research she did by interviewing women in scientific fields or with degrees in science, and although this is interesting, I didn t find it to be a very reliable or consistent source Everyone has a different experience, and the author even stated that the sample of people she interviewed may not have represented the group of female scientists very well She also made assumptions that did not seem reasonable to me For I was generally disappointed with this book The author focuses most on the research she did by interviewing women in scientific fields or with degrees in science, and although this is interesting, I didn t find it to be a very reliable or consistent source Everyone has a different experience, and the author even stated that the sample of people she interviewed may not have represented the group of female scientists very well She also made assumptions that did not seem reasonable to me For example, in one section, the author said that the women she interviewed who had left scientific careers did not say that harassment or discrimination against them caused them to leave The author however, argued that harassment or discrimination must have played a part, just not very obviously I thought that this was an unreasonable assumption The title of this book was misleading to me as well The book might mention Marie Curie once, and just barely, and it doesn t talk about women who overcame the challenges much, if at all The book feltthan a flimsy discussion rather than a well researched paper or book That being said, I did enjoy reading about a few ideas that this book introduced to me The author begins the book by describing a science classroom and the different ways in which students do an experiment and interact with their peers in doing so, and then analyzes and explains the differences between the education of girls and the education of boys I found it interesting to look at differences in learning styles Also, the author stated that men generally score higher in the math part of the SAT, but women get higher grades in math classes in college This wasn t something I had heard before Chapters 4 and 5 focused on bias towards women in STEM fields, sexual harassment in the workplace, and the effect of college on confidence, especially for women Large universities that focus on STEM, cause some very bright people to feel inadequate because of those surrounding them In addition, these colleges often have a near 2 1 ratio of men to women, so liberal arts colleges can be a better option for some This actually helped me feelconfident in my college choice Interesting and thought provoking I checked this book out to use as a resource for my history term paper on women in science , but found ituseful for reading on my own It brought up some important studies and statistics that illustrate issues which need to be addressed if women are to truly succeed in science My only complaints It was a little bit repetitive in its comments and suggestions Each section reached the same conclusion it felt like one large research paper rather than a b Interesting and thought provoking I checked this book out to use as a resource for my history term paper on women in science , but found ituseful for reading on my own It brought up some important studies and statistics that illustrate issues which need to be addressed if women are to truly succeed in science My only complaints It was a little bit repetitive in its comments and suggestions Each section reached the same conclusion it felt like one large research paper rather than a book at times And it was depressing to read about all of the problems women face, even though we are in an improved era As a female looking to enter the field of science, this scared me a little, though it validated some of my decisions about where to go to college namely a small school rather than large university As I read it, I compared some of the ideas posed to those in Why Beautiful People Have More Daughters, which discussed the differences between the sexes This, too, discussed differences between the sexes, and suggested partially the same thing men and women do think differently because of genetics, but here the author suggests that most of the differences come from social conditioning She accepts that women aredrawn to social networks and rely on othersthan men do, and she uses statistics to show that women haveof a desire to help others, but does not state whether this is a natural trait or a learned one The book was definitely worth reading, and the most important point was this in order to improve the scientific environment for women, everyone needs to help Every man and woman needs to change his or her prejudices and biases, both conscious and unconscious If all teachers, parents, and administrators don t change, nothing big can happen This book contains a lot of valuable information both anecdotal and research data about the status of women scientists As a woman scientist, I found the stories very interesting comparing my own story with those of others, seeing parallels, acknowledging familiar attitudes, etc I think the author did a great job of compiling information and transferring these data into a nice read I would recommend this book to other women scientists, those aspiring to be, parents and educators The book This book contains a lot of valuable information both anecdotal and research data about the status of women scientists As a woman scientist, I found the stories very interesting comparing my own story with those of others, seeing parallels, acknowledging familiar attitudes, etc I think the author did a great job of compiling information and transferring these data into a nice read I would recommend this book to other women scientists, those aspiring to be, parents and educators The book is not overly optimistic, nor is it negative I think it tries to remain objective and open I hope that this book does get widely read and inspires important discussion about the importance of diversity in science This book discussed the problems facing women in science and engineering The problems facing women in these careers are the same facing women in other fields visibility, support, sexism, bias It was a nice overview, but I was expectingMore depth,applicable solutions than just encourage your children to go to the science museum not that I should be complaining, because whatsolutions can you offer in the face of entrenched, structural, pervasive problems It s a mammoth This book discussed the problems facing women in science and engineering The problems facing women in these careers are the same facing women in other fields visibility, support, sexism, bias It was a nice overview, but I was expectingMore depth,applicable solutions than just encourage your children to go to the science museum not that I should be complaining, because whatsolutions can you offer in the face of entrenched, structural, pervasive problems It s a mammoth problem that couldn t be boiled down in a single volume At the very least, this book provided a jumping off point for me to continue thinking about and arguing about these very issues Caveat A depressing read for those women trying to pave their way in the science field I was choked with fear after reading each chapter and could not wait to get this book as far from my sight as possible That worked really well the ideas are imprinted on my brain, gnawing at my insides to act fast Three star rating The ideas messages are repetitive I don t know if it is deliberate drill in the reader s mind the harsh reality of an academic career in science, beseeching them to remove Caveat A depressing read for those women trying to pave their way in the science field I was choked with fear after reading each chapter and could not wait to get this book as far from my sight as possible That worked really well the ideas are imprinted on my brain, gnawing at my insides to act fast Three star rating The ideas messages are repetitive I don t know if it is deliberate drill in the reader s mind the harsh reality of an academic career in science, beseeching them to remove their rosy glasses or just bad writing Whatever the reason, it jolted me right out of my fantasies of a perfect career That can t be a good thing, right |READ EBOOK ☿ Who's Afraid of Marie Curie?: The Challenges Facing Women in Science and Technology ♙ In , Larry Summers, former president of Harvard, sparked an outcry when he suggested that women might not be as innately gifted in scientific and mathematical ability as men Since then, issues related to the lack of women in science and engineering have appeared in the news, but these sound bites tell only part of the story Who s Afraid of Marie Curieweaves together research and women s personal stories, presenting both the challenges and triumphs women experience in the sciences Author Linley Erin Hall has interviewed than one hundred women, including students of all ages, to uncover what sparked their interest in science, what they ve experienced in their careers, and, in some cases, why they decided to leave their field Her findings are that change is happening, but some women are being left behind while others shoot ahead Written in accessible language rather than scholarly jargon, Who s Afraid of Marie Curieexplores the complexity behind the sound bites to present a real picture of women in science and technology This book is very observant on how there is gender inequality in the work world and schools The author strongly convinces why we should change gender inequality for women working in the science field and the women who would want to work in the science field by pointing out the many sad truths she discovers I would recommend this book to people who are interested in Science and World Issues. I would consider this essential reading for any women considering a career in science, academia or engineering. Good insight into the difficulties women are still facing while pursuing higher degrees in science and technology Well written but it did get repetative.