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@Read Epub Æ Visions of Gerard º His lifeended when he was nine and the nuns of St Louis de France Parochial School were at his bedside to take down his dying words because they d heard his astonishing revelations of heaven delivered in catechism on no encouragement than it was his turn to speak Unique among Jack Kerouac s novels, Visions of Gerard focuses on the scenes and sensations of childhood the wisdom, anguish, intensity, innocence, evil, insight, suffering, delight, and shock as they were revealed in the short tragic happy life of his saintly brother, Gerard Set in Kerouac s hometown of Lowell, Massachusetts, it is an unsettling, beautiful, and sad exploration of the meaning and precariousness of existence This book seems the most personal of Kerouac s I ve read thus far More of his family, his home and the people closest to him, not some wayward adventure somewhere Yet it feels like he still held back at the same time, that there wasto say on the subject of his brother no doubt it effected him in a tremendous way duh , and the mixture of Buddhist and Catholic beliefs on Kerouac s mind are integral with all of this as well The book is brief, tragic and sudden There are no periods that This book seems the most personal of Kerouac s I ve read thus far More of his family, his home and the people closest to him, not some wayward adventure somewhere Yet it feels like he still held back at the same time, that there wasto say on the subject of his brother no doubt it effected him in a tremendous way duh , and the mixture of Buddhist and Catholic beliefs on Kerouac s mind are integral with all of this as well The book is brief, tragic and sudden There are no periods that i could find , and instead Em dashes run throughout It s like a sort of destiny that the end comes at such a speed, one continuous thought I was going to read Visions of Cody Kerouac s fictional Neal Cassady but when I realised Visions of Gerald was based upon the short life of his sick brother I thought I d rather read this For me I ve always found Kerouac books hovering around the three star rating, and its the same here, yet something finds me returning to his writing every now and again regardless Who knows, maybe one day I ll come across something that really blows me away, and as he did write an awful lot, the odds aren t I was going to read Visions of Cody Kerouac s fictional Neal Cassady but when I realised Visions of Gerald was based upon the short life of his sick brother I thought I d rather read this For me I ve always found Kerouac books hovering around the three star rating, and its the same here, yet something finds me returning to his writing every now and again regardless Who knows, maybe one day I ll come across something that really blows me away, and as he did write an awful lot, the odds aren t bad I d say So here Kerouac relates to his brother Gerard who passed away at the very young age of nine The narrative is like a codex of Jack s memory, making firm those ephemeral thoughts of childhood that so inform our adult lives Jack regards childhood with reverence, looking back at Gerard s innocence as nearing holy Blending dream and reality its a lyrical and altogether sad book, that doesn t have any of the buzz and energy of some of his other works It s difficult to say whether most of the scenes featuring his brother and other family members are actual memories from Jack s youth, but its still difficult not to be moved in some way One of those many books that was good whilst reading it, but its not going to hang around in my mind for too long after An out and out memoir would have been better The framework for this novel is the inevitable death of Kerouac s 9 year old, older brother, from an incurable sickness Although the somber backdrop was a debbie downer, the style was uplifting This book is loaded with poetic prose, making it my favorite Kerouac work It could have been labeled an epoch poem, but poetry doesn t sell, not like novels.Truman Capote said Kerouac s stuff wasn t writing, it was typing But stick your finger anywhere in this book and read an excerpt and you will rec The framework for this novel is the inevitable death of Kerouac s 9 year old, older brother, from an incurable sickness Although the somber backdrop was a debbie downer, the style was uplifting This book is loaded with poetic prose, making it my favorite Kerouac work It could have been labeled an epoch poem, but poetry doesn t sell, not like novels.Truman Capote said Kerouac s stuff wasn t writing, it was typing But stick your finger anywhere in this book and read an excerpt and you will recognize that Kerouac wrote it Do the same with Capote, and anyone could have written it To develop such a distinctive style as Kerouac did in a field that has been so heavily plowed by so many ploughmen before is no easy task.You see the deep respect Kerouac had for his mother, suffering so much during the ordeal she lost her teeth one by one, suffering as only a mother can suffer Kerouac near the end, at the funeral, writes, I want to express somehow, Here and Now, I see the ecstasy, the divine and perfect ecstasy For me, I don t want to see ecstasy when God s Kingdom Comes I want to see no9 year olds helplessly dying This beginning novel in the ongoing Duluoz Legend gives a decent glimpse into the brilliance Kerouac would later achieve, but the glimpse arrives unfashionably late.There s a style to the prose of Jack Kerouac 1922 1969 where he s some sort of middle passage, some sort of vessel that is constantly taking and giving His state of reverie is always emphasizing the prettiness of things, though they may be nothingthan pretty destroyed This constant observation and absorption doesn t leave m This beginning novel in the ongoing Duluoz Legend gives a decent glimpse into the brilliance Kerouac would later achieve, but the glimpse arrives unfashionably late.There s a style to the prose of Jack Kerouac 1922 1969 where he s some sort of middle passage, some sort of vessel that is constantly taking and giving His state of reverie is always emphasizing the prettiness of things, though they may be nothingthan pretty destroyed This constant observation and absorption doesn t leave much time to spend in a single place, a trait that serves Kerouac s work well.However, Visions of Gerard Penguin Non Classics, ISBN 0140144528 suffers from the same traits that make some of Keroauc s other work a success.Capote s Famous QuoteMost fans of Kerouac, or anyone who has taken even the tiniest look into beat culture, have heard American author Truman Capote s 1924 1984 quote about Kerouac s work That s not writing, that s typing.Maybe Capote just read Visions of Gerard To think that his comment about Kerouac merely typing instead of actually writing is directed towards the nomadic quest for beauty in On the Road or the pros and cons of indulgence as found in Big Sur is almost preposterous Despite the triumph of Kerouac s style in his other work, Visions of Gerard is flaccid and plodding, going nowhere and moving quickly.A Strong Finish Comes Too LateIn Visions of Gerard, only need the last twenty or thirty, to get in a scene or two with a living Gerard pages are necessary to see what Kerouac was trying to accomplish in kicking off the Duluoz legend the loss of maybe not a saint, but the idea of sainthood and how it would effect Jack Duluoz Sal Paradise Jack Kerouac in the years to come.Aside from a few good lines here and there, the pages that precede the end are nearly worthless Kerouac spends too much time in one place, spinning his faux poetic prose into nothing much at all The word web of beauty that wasn t.Ol Jack tends to get boring and annoying in his struggle to type through the thoughts in his head For the diehards, go ahead and read Visions of Gerard It goes fast, and the last 20 30 pages are made of the sad wonder that only Kerouac can deliver.When he starts writing through his thoughts instead of typing through them, he finally gives the reader an opportunity to see Gerard as the fallen angel he may have always been Unfortunately, by the time Kerouac falls into his groove, the reader is already lost and uninterested, moving away from the same commonplace things that Kerouac rallies against in his other works