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Honestly this book isn t that great to me While the book is printed on excellent pages and the color is great I found it lacking The cover art shows Snow White so I expectedknown Disney titles I suppose the title does say hidden so I should ve known the art would be from obscure projects that are pretty much unknown to most This book is mainly for people who are way into Disney artist and remember this is from the Golden Age so there aren t many illustrations from canon I think j Honestly this book isn t that great to me While the book is printed on excellent pages and the color is great I found it lacking The cover art shows Snow White so I expectedknown Disney titles I suppose the title does say hidden so I should ve known the art would be from obscure projects that are pretty much unknown to most This book is mainly for people who are way into Disney artist and remember this is from the Golden Age so there aren t many illustrations from canon I think just some Pinocchio and Snow White There are some really neat dragon illustrations that I enjoyed Otherwise meh (((FREE PDF))) ↟ They Drew as They Pleased: The Hidden Art of Disney's Golden Age ⇵ As the Walt Disney Studio entered its first decade and embarked on some of the most ambitious animated films of the time, Disney hired a group of concept artists whose sole mission was to explore ideas and inspire their fellow animators They Drew as They Pleased showcases four of these early pioneers and features artwork developed by them for the Disney shorts from the s, including many unproduced projects, as well as for Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, Pinocchio, and some early work for later features such as Alice in Wonderland and Peter Pan Introducing new biographical material about the artists and including largely unpublished artwork from the depths of the Walt Disney Archives and the Disney Animation Research Library, this volume offers a window into the most inspiring work created by the best Disney artists during the studio s early golden ageThey Drew as They Pleased is the first in what promises to be a revealing and fascinating series of books about Disney s largely unexamined concept artists, with six volumes spanning the decades between the s and s CopyrightDisney Enterprises, Inc All rights reserved A beauty of a book, featuring the hidden art from the Golden Age of Disney Animation along with condensed but concise biographies of four members of the Story Department, whose sole mission was to inspire their colleagues, and whose influence is evident from the samplings of their work found in this volume from Ghez.The four concept artists covered by Ghez are representative of a larger pool, but chosen by Ghez with purpose These trailblazers in the then newly created position concept artists A beauty of a book, featuring the hidden art from the Golden Age of Disney Animation along with condensed but concise biographies of four members of the Story Department, whose sole mission was to inspire their colleagues, and whose influence is evident from the samplings of their work found in this volume from Ghez.The four concept artists covered by Ghez are representative of a larger pool, but chosen by Ghez with purpose These trailblazers in the then newly created position concept artists were tasked to discover ideas, jokes, characters, and settings but whose work would most likely never been seen by the movie going audience Albert Hurter, Ferdinand Horvath, Gustaf Tenggren, and Bianca Majolie all brought their own individual talent, experience, and personalities to the rising company that would become the Disney of today What I particularly love about this series are the back room stories they offer up Disney s Nine Old Men are famous I remember the coverage and interviews about and from them at the end of the special edition VHS tapes of the huge Disney films from when I was growing up But it was rare to hear the names of the first layers of talent from within the depths of the studio even rarer when those names belonged to a woman.Bianca Majolie s story was one that would lead to the other female Disney artists who joined after Bianca, and who would go even farther but Bianca had opened the way And like many other animation artists from those early days, the burn out was swift The work, the days, the pressure must ve been grueling and Majolie s story is no exception Ghez details her abrupt departure The years at Disney had been too intense and she was clearly burned out I lost interest, explained Bianca to John Canemaker years later I went on a long vacation When I came back my desk was occupied It happened abruptly No one told me I did run into someone in the hall who said, You know, you re fired I was so happy to break away from Disney Ghez has included a wonderful portfolio for each artist both intermingled with their biography and over many pages following The influence and inspiration is evident and to know many of those images and early design sketches is to understand the impact on the animation for which Disney would become famous I ve been following Disney historian Didier Ghez since the mid 2000s, when he first started writing about old style Walt Disney Studio goodness on his blog, Disney History It was delightful to find that his labors have brought forth a fancy coffee table style book of vintage Disney studio art the first of a series The handsome 2015 hardback, They Drew As They Pleased The Hidden Art of Disney s Golden Age The 1930s pays homage to overlooked artists who worked at the Disney studio in its pr I ve been following Disney historian Didier Ghez since the mid 2000s, when he first started writing about old style Walt Disney Studio goodness on his blog, Disney History It was delightful to find that his labors have brought forth a fancy coffee table style book of vintage Disney studio art the first of a series The handsome 2015 hardback, They Drew As They Pleased The Hidden Art of Disney s Golden Age The 1930s pays homage to overlooked artists who worked at the Disney studio in its prime They Drew As They Pleased gives a new spin to a familiar subject, shedding light on four particular artists with mini biographies and a host of previously unpublished artwork Even for those well versed in what the Disney studio was working on in the 30s Mickey Mouse cartoons, Silly Symphonies shorts, the features Snow White, Pinocchio and Fantasia there s a lot of surprises within Although the idea of using concept artists in film and TV production is pretty common today, back in the 30s it was pretty rare Indeed, Walt Disney was the first animation producer to realize the potential of hiring imaginative artists strictly for the purpose of inspiring the look and feel of the final product The projects that these artists worked on included not just the classics listed above, but also films not released until much later Peter Pan, Alice in Wonderland and Cinderella and shelved projects Ballet de Fleurs, Streubel Peter, Japanese Symphony.The artists profiled in They Drew As They Pleased The Hidden Art of Disney s Golden Age The 1930s are pretty fascinating, especially given that I was familiar with just one the brilliant Gustaf Tenggren They are Albert Hurter 1883 1942 , Disney s first story artist Hurter s imaginative, spontaneous pencil drawings provided visual flair to many a Mickey Mouse and Silly Symphony cartoon Some of his stuff reproduced here pushes the limits, going in a surreal, Dr Seuss like direction Hurter s life story was as unique as his talent Disney kept him on the payroll, even as failing health had him in a convalescent home Ferdinand Horvath 1891 1973 lent his wide ranging abilities to layouts, animation, gag drawings, illustration at the studio over a period of several years Horvath had had a tempestuous relationship with Disney, although it doesn t show in his whimsical, kinetic and polished work Gustaf Tenggren 1896 1970 Like Hurter, Gustaf Tenggren was an eccentric European expat whose visual flair left its mark on a variety of Disney productions Most significantly, his gorgeous production art brought an immersive Old World sensibility to Snow White and Pinocchio That celebrated art is reproduced here, along with some fascinating storyboard art and production studies Tenggren s bio, like Hurter s, reveals a fascinating, quirky life will someone do a long form bio on this guy I d snap it up Bianca Majolie 1900 1997 Besting Mary Blair by a few years, Majolie was Disney s first female concept artist A classmate of Walt s from Chicago, Majolie endeared herself to Disney by contributing a feminine touch to a handful of short subjects a few of which went unreleased in the late 30s Unfortunately, the overtly macho atmosphere in Disney s story department prompted Majolie to resign in 1940 Too bad based on this book, her work was delightful They Drew As They Pleased The Hidden Art of Disney s Golden Age The 1930s was published in 2015 by Chronicle A follow up volume, the first of two covering the 1940s, just came out last month Ghez himself told me that there will be six volumes published, in total yeah Scrubbles.net review, September 14, 2016 I can t draw a convincing stick figure, but I ve always been interested in animation art Ghez is probably today s leading historian of the Disney Studios and the art it produced, and this is the latest volume in an ongoing series, this time about the first four concept artists Disney hired to come up with the basic ideas for feature film projects which the other artists then developed Basically, they were paid to sit all day in a comfortable office and draw whatever came into their heads Whic I can t draw a convincing stick figure, but I ve always been interested in animation art Ghez is probably today s leading historian of the Disney Studios and the art it produced, and this is the latest volume in an ongoing series, this time about the first four concept artists Disney hired to come up with the basic ideas for feature film projects which the other artists then developed Basically, they were paid to sit all day in a comfortable office and draw whatever came into their heads Which sounds like a dream job, but most of the people who did it burned out after a surprisingly short time These four, though, set the style by which Disney films were known for the next two generations, and their work is still how most of us picture the fairy tales we read as kids the older generation, that is.European born Albert Hurter, who was already almost fifty when he started with Disney in 1931, was known for his highly original imagination Disney said he had a cigar in his left hand, and a magic wand in his right hand Many thousands of his drawings have survived in the archives, including his canonical concepts of the Seven Dwarves, his work on The Grasshopper and the Ant and Dumbo, and the first concepts that became Cinderella a decade after Hurter s death.Ferdinand Horvath, also European, was a movie junkie and muchof a realist than Hurter if that term can be applied to Disney films at all He s best known for his work on the various Silly Symphonies, especially the Ballet des Fleurs, and also for Goldilocks and for the notion of the Three Blind Mice as musketeers.Gustaf Tenggren was already famous as a portraitist and for his Arthur Rakham like illustrations in his native Sweden when Disney hired him 1936 His best work was for Pinocchio, a rather dark film, which features the sort if small, cobblestoned villages in which Tenggren had grown up That movie frankly scared the crap out of four year old me when I first saw it in the late 40s Bianca Majolie, a native of Rome, was the first story artist ever hired at the Disney Studios when she began in 1940 She had been a high school classmate of Disney s in Chicago in 1917, but they didn t really know each other She started in newspaper comic strips but eventually caught Disney s eye because of her creativity and sheer talent She also is noted especially for her work on the Silly Symphonies.Naturally, this is a lushly illustrated volume, in a large enough format to show off the details of the art If you have an interest in serial art of any kind, or if you simply grew up with the early Disney films, this book is a great way to spend a rainy weekend Maybeof 3.5 stars than a true 4 star rating.I love the information included here, highlighting four lesser known animators who mostly did conceptual work for Disney, and the art itself is gorgeous and printed beautifully Unfortunately, the actual writing itself is where this book falls a little flat for me I found the mini biographies for each of the artists very dry and, while I appreciate the use of myriad primary sources for information, I also felt that Ghez relied much too heavily o Maybeof 3.5 stars than a true 4 star rating.I love the information included here, highlighting four lesser known animators who mostly did conceptual work for Disney, and the art itself is gorgeous and printed beautifully Unfortunately, the actual writing itself is where this book falls a little flat for me I found the mini biographies for each of the artists very dry and, while I appreciate the use of myriad primary sources for information, I also felt that Ghez relied much too heavily on block quotes from those materials.Depending on a perspective reader s main point of interest, I m not sure that this book is worth the money If someone just wants a beautiful coffee table book full of rough and preliminary artwork, then it probably is However for those who prefer these types of books to also have a lot of substance to them like I do then it falls a little short Luckily I found it onfor 7 rather than the 40 original price and for that amount it s obviouslythan worth it.Overall, I m thrilled to have a new book added to my Disney collection, and relatively happy with the new information and art found within it What a fascinating look into the personal and work lives of several of Disney s early artists The biographies alone are terrific but coupled with the art was just beyond terrific Anybody who enjoys history, art, animation and of course Disney should check out this book It s really light on art, but it balances that out by introducing the fascinating individuals that created it. They Drew As They Pleased is a beautiful coffee table book on the art of four Disney story artists of the 1930s two well known, Albert Hurter and Gustaf Tenggren, and two much less known, Ferdinand Horvath and Bianca Majolie Interestingly, all four were born in Europe Ghez provides modest biographies for the four artists, with Horvath s story being the most interesting, as Ghez could use the artist s diary Unfortunately, the biographies are too slim to be really insightful, and the real in They Drew As They Pleased is a beautiful coffee table book on the art of four Disney story artists of the 1930s two well known, Albert Hurter and Gustaf Tenggren, and two much less known, Ferdinand Horvath and Bianca Majolie Interestingly, all four were born in Europe Ghez provides modest biographies for the four artists, with Horvath s story being the most interesting, as Ghez could use the artist s diary Unfortunately, the biographies are too slim to be really insightful, and the real influence of the artists on the stories and looks of individual films remains largely obscure.The art doesn t help either Surely, the book is filled with beautiful sketches and paintings, ca 99% never seen before, but most of the art is for abandoned projects, or cannot be linked clearly to any existing film Tenggren s influence is most apparent, as the book shows a great deal of his stunning, and very recognizable artwork for The Old Mill and Pinocchio In contrast, Bianca Majolie s contribution seems to be limited to the Sugar Plum Fairy section of The Nutcracker Suite in Fantasia 1940 Hurter s most striking contributions are for the Silly Symphonies The Grasshopper and the Ants , The Wise Little Hen and The Flying Mouse While Horvath seemed to excel in abandoned projects, this book shows that he clearly influenced the looks of the Silly Symphonies Three Blind Mice and The Practical Pig Nevertheless, in the text Ghez suggest a much greater influence by all four artists Thus, like John Canemaker s The Art And Flair Of Mary Blair An Appreciation the book is an enjoyable and important homage to great Disney artists, but also a slightly frustrating one There is something uncomfortable about this book It is by no means a bad book, nor a bad way to appreciate a quartet of artists whose skill in drawing and creativity helped make Disney a successful studio during a period where work for skilled animators was very scarce But the book is both a testament as well as an example of the difficult struggle that exists between creativity and corporate identity that Disney and a great many other companies struggle with The author does as good job tr There is something uncomfortable about this book It is by no means a bad book, nor a bad way to appreciate a quartet of artists whose skill in drawing and creativity helped make Disney a successful studio during a period where work for skilled animators was very scarce But the book is both a testament as well as an example of the difficult struggle that exists between creativity and corporate identity that Disney and a great many other companies struggle with The author does as good job trying to finesse this tension, wondering why it is that talented illustrators would have a hard time staying at one of the few well paying jobs in the 1930 s while also managing to describe the incessant demands of Walt Disney for new ideas, some of which would be scrapped, as well as his abusive negativity towards the creativity that his illustrators had, making his head illustrator positions ones that were simultaneously treasured as well as toxic for those who held them The author portrays working at Disney in positions that forced one to be close to Walt Disney as a poisoned chalice, and no amount of soft pedaling can make this sound pleasant to a reader who is sensitive to such matters.This book is about 200 pages long or so and it is focused on four main animators who worked for Disney in the 1930 s and early 1940 s The book begins with a foreword by Pete Docter as well as a preface and a look at inspiration and the author s own use of previous works, which the title itself is an homage to After that the author discusses the art of Albert Hurter, Ferdinand Horvath, Gustaf Tenggren, and Bianca Majolie and provides some stunning examples of that concept and film art that they worked on while they were at Disney studios The author explores their European origins and tells stories about Walt Disney s reluctance to hire women because of his concerns that they would marry and get pregnant and quit as well as the frustration that resulted when animators would draw for shorts and even films most of them taken from literature in the Disney library that would be shelved when they proved difficult or expensive to do The author also demonstrates the quirks of these people, who were of different personalities and a shared struggle to handle the stress of working for the demanding and perfectionistic Walt Disney.Despite the fact that the author does not present Disney as a particularly good place to work for for all of the creativity that came out of the studio during the 1930 s, the book succeeds largely on the basis of its gorgeous art and the fact that the author has evidently done his homework on presenting the art as well as the lives of the people he chronicles here Yet it is a bit puzzling as to why Disney commissioned a work that is so painfully unpleasant in its discussion of Walt Disney as a man Whatever can be said about him as the creator of a successful business, he does not come off well in these pages to those who read this book and avoid looking only at the pictures It is mystifying as to whether the contemporary leadership at Disney is hostile to Walt Disney especially his political conservatism in wanting to portray him in such a negative light here Whether the negative portrayal is intentional or not the book is certainly an example of the tension that exists between creative people and the business world