(((READ EBOOK))) ⇱ The Wizard War: British Scientific Intelligence, 1939-1945 ☞ PDF eBook or Kindle ePUB free

This is one of the few classic memoirs of the second world war, and it is not hard to see why it is still in print it s colourful, informative, witty, extremely well written and a wide view of the action But it is also intriguing like his counterpart in SOE Leo Marks, Jones knew a lotabout the world of SIS than he let on.Jones traces his involvement in the war from the time he realized it was inevitable and takes pains to demonstrate his patriotism and eagerness to serve his country By This is one of the few classic memoirs of the second world war, and it is not hard to see why it is still in print it s colourful, informative, witty, extremely well written and a wide view of the action But it is also intriguing like his counterpart in SOE Leo Marks, Jones knew a lotabout the world of SIS than he let on.Jones traces his involvement in the war from the time he realized it was inevitable and takes pains to demonstrate his patriotism and eagerness to serve his country By a combination of his obvious talent and luck he landed the crucial role of Scientific Intelligence advisor to the Air Ministry at a critical time of the war and guided successful efforts to understand and ameliorate the enemy s technical advantages At the same time, he had to fight the not so successful battle against his own bureaucracy who seemed to have as much of a problem with his success as did the Germans Jones leavens this part of the tale with dry humour, but it is implicit that he regarded the Ministry as his first obstacle in any plan This battle never ceased throughout the war his story of having to overcome the misconceptions of the V1 and V2 rockets by a scientific committee is retrospectively shocking.That tension recalled to me Leo Marks, who fought similar battles from a less lofty perch Both keenly felt their debt to field agents Marks trained them, Jones depended on their reports And both were good at keeping secrets, a fact you only learn by comparing their accounts of events with the subsequent fuller detail of later reports Jones account of the Ju 88 that defected to Scotland is often quoted, but he does not mention the possibility that two of the defectors were known spies His side of the Thomas Sneum story is similarly elliptical we may never know why.I harp on these points because the book is very seductive in its way Jones was unapologetic in his support of Churchill, and is never short of an admiring anecdote of this hero or that anti hero There are exciting raids and scientific detective stories and all is masterfully told against a background of such secrecy it is a wonder he was able to be as detailed as he was Then you realize how much he was still holding back So enjoy but be wary Jones was an excellent storyteller and knew what got in the way of a good story (((READ EBOOK))) ⇗ The Wizard War: British Scientific Intelligence, 1939-1945 ⇔ Not only was Professor Jones the most important British wartime scientist, but he can also write This book is a riveting read When it came to outhoaxing the Germans in the Wizard War, the Professor was the wizard of them all London Daily Express This is a wonderfully readable account of the beginnings of British Scientific Intelligence, written by scientist and practical joker, R.V Jones who found, in the job of divining and countering German military technology, a perfect niche for his unique skills Unlike many other books on my list, whose focus is on the development of new technologies, Jones s story is about using spies, aerial photography, RDF, Bletchley Park decrypts, reverse engineering and sheer scientific method to determine This is a wonderfully readable account of the beginnings of British Scientific Intelligence, written by scientist and practical joker, R.V Jones who found, in the job of divining and countering German military technology, a perfect niche for his unique skills Unlike many other books on my list, whose focus is on the development of new technologies, Jones s story is about using spies, aerial photography, RDF, Bletchley Park decrypts, reverse engineering and sheer scientific method to determine not only what technologies Hitler had but how to detect, spoof, hoax and blind them, steal them through guerrilla raids and or bomb their operations, research compounds, and sources of production.That s one side to this story The other, and equally fascinating tale, is about the heady and complex internal politics of working with Churchill and his scientific and military cadre Jones was sponsored by his former professor, Lindemann, Churchill s closest scientific advisor Because of Jone s focus on radar, he was also inextricably tied to British radar development which was being guided by Tizard Lindemann s feud with Tizard is legendary, as is his efforts to slow, discourage and divert funding from all activities and investigations regarding radar Tizard s adopted mission in life Jones found himself in the middle On the one hand, he needed Lindemann for access to Churchill On the other all of his intelligence on radar was proving that Tizard was right and Lindemann was wrong On the military side, the book contains some wonderful stories of Jones relationships supportive, hostile, and or strange with British military commanders In one case we have a military command level officer feeding intelligence to Jones in direct violation of his politically motivated orders, simply because he knew that Jones could dofor the war effort There are several cases where spies are sent to Jones so that different military arms could figure out where his secret source of information was coming from and pry his responsibilities away from him Examples on the strange side include Jones having to learn about and coddle officers passions for model trains or fly fishing in order to get approval for desperately needed resources Jones thrived in this environment But his proudest and most exhilarating moments were clearly in debates fought and victories won with Churchill and his scientific military council As with most histories, this book progresses through eras, starting with the defence of Britain, with its special focus on uncovering and thwarting German bomber guidance systems As Britain s focus moves to offence, Jones focus moves research on the night fighter guidance network and the use of spoofing techniques like Window , Moonshine and others In the final era, the focus is on the V1 V2, Peenemunde and struggles over who will control nuclear weapons intelligence.Jones wraps up, starting with The Year of Madness following the war, with his beliefs about Scientific Intelligence, how it should be structured and managed, why Britain lost its intelligence edge at the end of the war, how Churchill pulled him back into service to recover this edge, and why he eventually extricated himself from the weight and complexity of British bureaucracy to return to teaching.As a personal perspective on the beginnings of Scientific Intelligence, this is a unique book We have many books on the development of radar, on Bletchley park and decrypting the Enigma messages, on offence and defense in the air, on V weapons, spies and secret scientific research However, this is a story about an operation that sits right at the center of this web, drawing information from and manipulating all of these components I haven t found this story told anywhere else and I can t imagine it being told as well by any other author I read this book under the title The Wizard War It is the same book.This is a fascinating tale of the leader of British military intelligence during World War II There is so much in this book it is hard to know where to begin R.V Jones was one of the central players although not one of the highest ranking in countering technical advancements by the Germans The Germans deployed an amazing amount of new technology in World War II The British did too e.g., radar, airplanes, chaff, etc I read this book under the title The Wizard War It is the same book.This is a fascinating tale of the leader of British military intelligence during World War II There is so much in this book it is hard to know where to begin R.V Jones was one of the central players although not one of the highest ranking in countering technical advancements by the Germans The Germans deployed an amazing amount of new technology in World War II The British did too e.g., radar, airplanes, chaff, etc All of this is explained in full detail, enough so that the science and physics makes sense The science includes details of everything from the beam wars and the use of interference, to Window chaff , to how the anti German resistance operated, to improving aerial photo reconnaissance, to gyroscopes and navigation, to catapult launchers and V 2 rockets, and finally the atomic bomb It is amazing how much military intelligence could be gleaned from so little clear information The role of Enigma is central too, but not described in much detail in the book However its impact on and benefit to British military intelligence is evident throughout the book.Clearly, British military intelligence was crucial in the war However, after the war, R.V Jones was disillusioned by the directions of British military intelligence, and essentialy was shunted aside, ending up in academic We are fortunate to have this book however I m cobbling together some work on the Nazi missile program, so I m reading up everything I can on it I don t know that I would otherwise ever have picked up R.V Jones even though it s considered a must read among people interested in intelligence matters The measures the British scientific intel enterprise employed to get their hands around not only the V 1 V 2 threat, but Luftwaffe navigation aids and radar are described here for readers with only the barest background in physics or engin I m cobbling together some work on the Nazi missile program, so I m reading up everything I can on it I don t know that I would otherwise ever have picked up R.V Jones even though it s considered a must read among people interested in intelligence matters The measures the British scientific intel enterprise employed to get their hands around not only the V 1 V 2 threat, but Luftwaffe navigation aids and radar are described here for readers with only the barest background in physics or engineering and I think that s part of the book s enduring appeal There was plenty of cloak and dagger, as well as essential RAF photoreconnaissance we have grown to love in narratives about World War Two Jones also elucidates, though, how breaking the German s impregnable Enigma codes facilitated the inevitable victory and how the fact that the Allies had done so had to be protected with the utmost secrecy Crete may have been sacrificed to Hitler s airborne assault to protect this secret, after all Jones also describes the friction that occurs between scientists looking for answers affecting national security most notably his postulates of ignorance model, where an investigator thinks of an idea and tries it before the time is really ripe, and so he fails He then invents a reason for his failure which overlooks his own deficiencies and blames instead the operation of some fundamental flaw he is conditioned to look for basic reasons why something cannot be done In other words, it s never been done before, and my own experience argues that it can t happen now an intellectual inertia that caused some issues when comprehending an innovative liquid fueled surface to surface missile program He writes of pressure from certain government agencies to cook assessments and the fortitude necessary to stand up for one s impartial findings not to mention the Prime Minister standing up for those assessments at high level meetings Churchill replied that the matter was too technical for the Cabinet, and that he was personally prepared to accept the responsibility for the decision Jones shop was advocating Given current events, this sort of leadership at the top levels of government is inspiring and I think that s reason enough to recommend this book At the end of the day, Most Secret War is also advocacy for expertise and the skill of conveying it up the chain to people tasked to make serious decisions under pressure for example a hail of bombs falling every night on the capital city It is a reminder that intelligent and moral people willing to do public service for all the right reasons is a precious asset and that the threat of Nazi brain power, missiles, and nuclear fission threatened every accomplishment we have made since 1941 This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers To view it, click here This book is not light reading The edition I got my hands on, through the excellent Mobius Inter Library Loan system, had over 600 pages.Dr Jones was one the leading authorities if not THE leading authority on radar and radio navigation working for Britain during World War II Classically trained with a PhD in Physics, he got pulled into doing R D for HM Government before the onset of the war and became the hub of all information WRT radio navigation and radar.He started trying to develop i This book is not light reading The edition I got my hands on, through the excellent Mobius Inter Library Loan system, had over 600 pages.Dr Jones was one the leading authorities if not THE leading authority on radar and radio navigation working for Britain during World War II Classically trained with a PhD in Physics, he got pulled into doing RD for HM Government before the onset of the war and became the hub of all information WRT radio navigation and radar.He started trying to develop infrared systems for tracking aircraft, including making by hand infrared detectors When his research demonstrated the weaknesses in that technology, it was suspended.Between World Wars I and II, a radio navigation system had been developed by Lorenz of Germany It involved two transmitters with relatively narrow beams They were angled such that there was an evennarrow overlap between them One beam sent dots, the other dashes, synchronized, on the same frequency If you were flying down the overlap, you heard a continuous tone If you strayed too far to one side or the other, you heard dots or dashes emerge from the tone, indicating which direction you needed to steer to correct your course Put this near a major airport, use relatively low frequencies so the signals would bend to follow the curve of the earth and aircraft could navigate to such airports, from hundreds of miles away, with high precision The closer you got to the airport, the tighter the beams got and theprecisely you were lined up with the airport.Early in WW II, the Germans turned this idea around They had a system sending a beam over a target bombing area, and another beam intersecting it, from another direction In this fashion, the pilot could fly one of the beams and the bombardier could listen for the other Where the beams crossed, bombs away The Admiralty refused to believe this was possible The low frequencies involved meant the beams spread as the distance increased such a system would indicate a roughly square bombing zone multiple miles on a side the bombing was muchprecise than that Dr Jones explained they aren t using low frequencies higher frequencies meannarrow beams, so the bombing zone is a fraction of a mile on a side, even 200 miles away from the transmitters Ridiculous, the Admiralty stated Everyone knows that the higher frequencies don t bend as much to follow the curve of the earth they wouldn t be able to pick up the signal 100 miles away, much less 200 to bomb most of England Sure, he responded, if you re at ground level the bombers, though, are at 10 , 15 or 20,000 feet They can pick up the higher frequencies over 300 miles away,than enough to bomb most of England with very high precision And here s the math which shows just how much the signals will bend for each frequency.He had to fight with this kind of conventional wisdom, on the part of the Navy and Air Command, his entire tenure in Intelligence.His book is an excellent case study in how to run an effective team His immediate team members included engineers, a professor of German from a British university, pilots and various other scientists the epitome of cross discipline They correctly determined the specifications of German radio navigation, German radar, the V 1 and V 2 missiles and kept a close watch on the development of the German nuclear program They determined how to jam the radio navigation, sending bombers off course They determined how to jam German radar for their own bombing raids, causing night fighters to go to the wrong areas They managed to fool the Germans into thinking the V 1s were overshooting their targets, causing the Germans to shorten the range, falling short of thepopulated areas.He did a lot of the searching and experimenting first hand, instead of depending on information which had been filtered through multiple layers As a result, he could speak, with confidence and technical proficiency, about how various systems worked.Early in his career, he was pulled into a cabinet meeting with Churchill, no less to discuss German radio navigation for bombing The various people in the room hemmed and hawed, arguing about how things worked Someone called out Dr Jones He spoke clearly, succinctly and authoritatively on the subject He knew EXACTLY how it worked, was able to explain it, as well as offered some examples of what could be done to counter it His explanation was trimmed to the bone not one wordthan was needed Churchill was, at first, speechless Then he emphatically ordered the entire cabinet to support Dr Jones in whatever he needed toward those ends After the meeting, he had Admirals, Air Wing Commanders and Cabinet Ministers lining up to ask what can I do to make this happen For each of them, he had a definite, specific answer I know EXACTLY the person you need to talk to about this, and here s why Oh, yeah, I know EXACTLY who to send on that mission, and here s why He made a supremely good first impression on the Prime Minister, providing accurate information and NEVER wasting someone s time Churchill became his personal friend for the rest of their lives And, at just about any point in the war, if he had a hard time getting something he needed, he got word to Churchill and stuff happened IMMEDIATELY.The German professor on his staff helped him decode some of the nuance in the German language One of Hitler s early speeches seemed to indicate they had a secret weapon they were going to unleash The prof saw through it, providing aaccurate translation, easing everyone s mind Many attempts, by the Germans, to spoof the British about the capabilities of various weapons failed because of his knowledge of the language Additionally, when Germany started fielding a new navigation system called Wotan the German equivalent to Odin in Norse Mythology , the fact that Wotan had only one eye had an important clue for them When Germany started fielding the Freya system, he was able to determine, based on German mythology, that it was intended to be a chain of radar stations with a 100 mile range Subsequent investigation proved him right, on all counts.He cultivated relationships with those at the tip of the spear on intel collection He was, frequently, personally acquainted with pilots who flew recon missions By telling them WHY they were going to this dangerous area and giving some idea of the sorts of things to look for, they were willing to risk their lives looking for stuff And, quite frequently, finding what he was looking for They were personally invested in the outcome of the mission, recognizing that lives could be saved if they could find such and such Many of them risked life and limb, repeatedly, finding stuff for him He is effusive with praise for their skill, determination and bravery.He understood the importance of personal relationships In addition to Churchill, he regularly had lunch with peers who were working other sections, frequently discovering you need to talk to so and so he s all over that problem He learned tremendous amounts from these informal meetings and also served as a nexus, connecting the appropriate people to others You need to talk to this guy he s been approaching that exact problem from a different angle On one occasion, he suggested that the recon cameras be deployed on the wingtips of aircraft instead of behind the cockpit , so that high speed flying wouldn t blur the images and so that the pilot had an easier time aiming the cameras When his suggestion met with some resistance, he discovered that the unit commander had a hobby of making jams and jellies Had he ever made quince jam No, but the guy would love to try he just couldn t get his hand on any quinces A package of quinces arrived for him later that week, courtesy of Dr Jones The cameras were fitted, per his specifications, that weekend And yes, the imagery not just un blurred but STEREOSCOPIC images was every bit as good as he hoped Such images were how they found the V 2 missed by multiple people looking at a single image, spotted when looking at stereoscopic images and first determined the height based on the shadow it cast.A bunch of very intelligent people And he was the head geek When the war was over, he got to interview a lot of his opposite numbers, usually Colonels, Generals and Field Marshals of the German military They were typically very intelligent, with good memories and lots of technical knowledge Quite often, they were amazed at just how much information British Intelligence had been able to collect and deduce He and his team did the collection, collation and deducing He pointedly kept his team small If it had grown too large, they might ve needed to develop some kind of communication system Instead, one of them would walk to the other s desk, show them some documents or images and converse on the subject Because there was no committee he was a sort of benevolent commander of a small, focused team , things happened FAST And in Intelligence, fast is important If the Germans are going to bomb Coventry, it s best if they re warned BEFORE the bombs start falling Quite often, they were able to provide several hours, if not a couple days, advance notice Indeed, he got intel that three cities, in particular were going to be bombed After the Germans bombed the first two, he sounded the alarm on the third one Nothing happened it wasn t bombed His critics yes, they existed had a field day A week or so later, recorded translated conversations of captured German bomber pilots indicated that they were GOING TO bomb that city but the recon aircraft noted a huge build up of anti aircraft guns around the city a result of his warning so they changed their minds and called off the raid.After the war, his small, focused team was turned into a committee He left and became a college professor And he helped multiple of his team members escape into academia as well.I suspect that, if I could ve met him, I would like him His intelligence, his pragmatism and his personality are quite clear from this book.I suspect someone could put together a team management course based on this book His team was EXTREMELY effective Most corporations would kill for such an efficient bunch.And, seeing as how he s British, no surprise that his humor is dry His mention of watching several tons of steel plating cartwheeling across the British countryside, as a result of an experiment I was laughing for at least 30 minutes after that Or how he met his wife And how she managed to utterly demolish a pair of opponents in a tennis match while wearing a PARTY DRESS Apparently, Vera was pretty spectacular, too A fascinating first hand account of the British scientific intelligence during the WWII written by Dr R.V.Jones, who headed the British scientific intelligence efforts throughout the war Sheds a whole new light on the events I ve recently read about in W Churchill s memoirs Also dispels some of the myths I thought to be facts, such as that Churchill knew about the impending bombardment of Coventry, but did nothing about it in order not to reveal the fact that the British succeeded in breakin A fascinating first hand account of the British scientific intelligence during the WWII written by Dr R.V.Jones, who headed the British scientific intelligence efforts throughout the war Sheds a whole new light on the events I ve recently read about in W Churchill s memoirs Also dispels some of the myths I thought to be facts, such as that Churchill knew about the impending bombardment of Coventry, but did nothing about it in order not to reveal the fact that the British succeeded in breaking the Enigma One of the recurring themes of the book, unfortunately, is how inefficient any organization becomes, even if it has a core of hard working knowledgeable people when it is influenced by egotistic, political or bureaucratic considerations Wonderful memoir of technology and information gathering, from an insider in the British intelligence services during WWII The phrase trust, but verify will always bring to mind some of theanecdotes found here, where that is only one of dozens of lessons we see in this history.I recommend Instruments Of Darkness The History Of Electronic Warfare, mentioned in this book, as supplemental reading Wonderful memoir of technology and information gathering, from an insider in the British intelligence services during WWII The phrase trust, but verify will always bring to mind some of theanecdotes found here, where that is only one of dozens of lessons we see in this history.I recommend Instruments Of Darkness The History Of Electronic Warfare, mentioned in this book, as supplemental reading Good read, but Kindle version missing many diagrams and photosI m annoyed that the electronic transcription of this book excludes about half the photographs It s an annoying lazy omission Enjoyed the book though. This is one of few books detailing radar during World War II I do not recall who said it now, but it was once said that radar is what enabled the war to go on as long as it did This book was recommended as a good history of British radar during World War II, which as stated in the book was mostly done by the British anyhow R V Jones is the man who helped win the Battle of the Beams In practicality, he did applied science and wasor less in charge of scientific intelligence which ex This is one of few books detailing radar during World War II I do not recall who said it now, but it was once said that radar is what enabled the war to go on as long as it did This book was recommended as a good history of British radar during World War II, which as stated in the book was mostly done by the British anyhow R V Jones is the man who helped win the Battle of the Beams In practicality, he did applied science and wasor less in charge of scientific intelligence which excluded the atomic bomb He has something to say on most scientific projects that Britain was involved in, including the atomic bomb In terms of technical processes, I have no science background, and I did not always follow what he was trying to do Generally, this part was fairly short and was not necessary to be understood He always explained what he figured out from the science and what the impact was In comparison to similar books, I found it quite an amusing and readable book because he was a practical joker, had a good sense of humor, and thought much of the people around him That being said, I do not think that most people would consider it an especially funny book This is apparently one of the very first books published after The Ultra Secret So Jones was able to mention the work at Bletchley Park on breaking the Enigma codes However, he was not at this time able to explain how it was done