(((FREE PDF))) ☠ The Unknown Industrial Prisoner ⇶ PDF eBook or Kindle ePUB free

Librarians have an invidious job, trying to allocate some books to the Subjects Catalogue I really feel for whoever had to deal with David Ireland s The Unknown Industrial Prisoner and eventually assigned it to these subject headings Manufacturing workers Death Working class Economic development AlienationWell, yes, I can see why these subjects were assigned, but they are not really what the book is about The Unknown Industrial Prisoner won the Miles Franklin Award in 1971 and I posted the op Librarians have an invidious job, trying to allocate some books to the Subjects Catalogue I really feel for whoever had to deal with David Ireland s The Unknown Industrial Prisoner and eventually assigned it to these subject headings Manufacturing workers Death Working class Economic development AlienationWell, yes, I can see why these subjects were assigned, but they are not really what the book is about The Unknown Industrial Prisoner won the Miles Franklin Award in 1971 and I posted the opening lines of the novel here It s such a bitter and angry book that the word alienation seems inadequate to describe its concerns Alienation today conjures up images of sulky adolescents lounging about in shopping malls instead of going to school, it just doesn t begin to scour the depths of angst in Ireland s novel It s the polarisation of society that interests Ireland the brutal, amoral industrial world that traps the workers into imprisonment, a world which he thinks is invisible to complacent Australia.I m calling it a novel, but it doesn t always seem like one There are extremely short episodes instead of chapters, and the writing style seems mostly though not alwayslike journalism than literary The multiple characters are all named, in that sly Australian way, to reflect aspects of their personality These include, for example, Two Pot Screamer, Doctor Death, the Volga Boatman and Calamity Jane the nurse, and the central characters The Great White Father, the Glass Canoe, the Samurai, Far Away Places and the Wandering Jew He isn t Jewish, so the moniker is anti Semitic Some of these monikers are apt but others are a bit opaque perhaps the allusions derive from the vanished pub world that Ireland evoked in The Glass Canoe see my review Or perhaps it s because I m a woman not privy to the secret language of men But it wasn t just trying to decode the names that made The Unknown Industrial Prisoner a challenge Far from it.To read the rest of my review please visit (((FREE PDF))) ↠ The Unknown Industrial Prisoner ⇟ Australian classic Dustjacket synopsis In his preface which comes near the end of this extraordinary novel David Ireland says It has been my aim to take apart, then build up piece by piece this mosaic of one kind of human lifeto remind my present age of its industrial adolescence Piece by piece, David Ireland portrays a kind of life which is lived at an oil refinery in Sydney from its highest tower from which one of the workers plunges to death, to the secret hide out in the mangroves where the men refresh themselves with such ladies as the Sandpiper and Never on Sundays He takes apart this vast industrial complex and its multitudinous characters, then reassembles it into a mosaic fiery and macabre, whose crazy patterns are lit with grim humour The huge structure becomes an image, at once amusing and appalling, of the whole industrial society in which modern man is trapped A harsh and remarkable work it will leave you shaken mildly or terribly according to your life experience National TimesDavid Ireland offers a fiercely brilliant comic portrait of Australia in the grip of a dehumanising labour system.This almost prophetic book has been written to recognise these unknown industrial prisoners M C ReviewsWhen I think of my favourite Australian novels, two 1970s works by David Ireland are near the top of the list The Unknown Industrial Prisoner and The Glass CA harsh and remarkable work it will leave you shaken mildly or terribly according to your life experience National TimesDavid Ireland offers a fiercely brilliant comic portrait of Australia in the grip of a dehumanising labour system.This almost prophetic book has been written to recognise these unknown industrial prisoners M C ReviewsWhen I think of my favourite Australian novels, two 1970s works by David Ireland are near the top of the list The Unknown Industrial Prisoner and The Glass Canoe Stephen RomeiThere had been nothing like it in Australian literature before, and the only thing like it since was Ireland s second great proletarian fiction, The Glass Canoe 1976 Peter Pierce An excellent, although difficult, book Ireland concedes nothing to the reader, immediately launching straight into the bitterly drawn vignettes of the puroil refinery workers and management that make up the entire novel The readers persistence is eventually rewarded as they coalesce, and even attain some urgency, into a narrative as the novel closes Much of the satire is still current and very funny although it is not a comic novel Recommended. this ruled Loved it I ve been looking for an Australian novel that doesn t fall into the genre of Australiana This is not set on an outback station Nor in the suburbs This doesn t deal with race relations, or Australian guilt Unknown Industrial Prisoner rests on its own creative powers Chapters are short and focus on one of the large cast of characters that occupy the oil refinery There is a Pynchonian joy in description as the workers piss fart about and sabotage the company s efforts at control.Su Loved it I ve been looking for an Australian novel that doesn t fall into the genre of Australiana This is not set on an outback station Nor in the suburbs This doesn t deal with race relations, or Australian guilt Unknown Industrial Prisoner rests on its own creative powers Chapters are short and focus on one of the large cast of characters that occupy the oil refinery There is a Pynchonian joy in description as the workers piss fart about and sabotage the company s efforts at control.Such an enjoyable novel about class and personal freedom