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Imagine if Kim Kardashian or one of the other Hollywood celebutantes wrote an insider s account of the scandalous lives of the rich and powerful.Scratch that Imagine that she wrote a SMART, COMPELLING insider s account of the scandalous lives of the rich and powerful Written by Georgiana, The Duchess of Devonshire, and published in 1781, The Sylph is an epistolary novel that follows a young Welsh beauty named Julia, who is plucked from the obscurity of her small country village and the hap Imagine if Kim Kardashian or one of the other Hollywood celebutantes wrote an insider s account of the scandalous lives of the rich and powerful.Scratch that Imagine that she wrote a SMART, COMPELLING insider s account of the scandalous lives of the rich and powerful Written by Georgiana, The Duchess of Devonshire, and published in 1781, The Sylph is an epistolary novel that follows a young Welsh beauty named Julia, who is plucked from the obscurity of her small country village and the happiness she shares with her sister and father by the rakish Sir William, and thrown into the debauchery of London s elite society Sadly, the novel closely mirrors Georgiana s own life and her painfully disappointing marriage to the Duke of Devonshire It isn t always pleasant to watch Julia stumble and suffer through many of the same pitfalls that plagued Georgiana, but it is fascinating and well worth checking out Ah, this long forgotten little novel from the 18th century is tops It gives a great insight into the world of the Ton, some of it shocking Where else would you find attempted rape, suicide, the selling of one s wife and gambling treated as the norm If only the BBC would snap it up and pop it on the box I d recommend it, if you can get hold of a copy that is Read hereDescription A novel in letters in which the heroine and letter writer, Julia, has married a dashing man about town, Sir William He leads a dissolute life in town, racking up gambling debts which he seeks to pay off by using his wife s inheritance Opening LETTER I.TO LORD BIDDULPH.It is a certain sign of a man s cause being bad, when he is obliged to quote precedents in the follies of others, to excuse his own You see I give up my cause at once I am convinced I have done a silly t Read hereDescription A novel in letters in which the heroine and letter writer, Julia, has married a dashing man about town, Sir William He leads a dissolute life in town, racking up gambling debts which he seeks to pay off by using his wife s inheritance Opening LETTER I.TO LORD BIDDULPH.It is a certain sign of a man s cause being bad, when he is obliged to quote precedents in the follies of others, to excuse his own You see I give up my cause at once I am convinced I have done a silly thing, and yet I can produce thousands who daily do the same with, perhaps, not so good a motive as myself In short, not to puzzle you too much, which I know is extremely irksome to a man who loves to have every thing as clear as a proposition in Euclid your friend now don t laugh is married Married Aye, why not don t every body marry those who have estates, to have heirs of their own and those who have nothing, to get something so, according to my system, every body marries.Week 3 of Literature of the English Country House is split between Nostell Priory in West Yorkshire and Chatsworth House in Derbyshire The Ton was a difficult place to be for a decent country girl. getting married is a very hazardous undertakingbeware did i like the book i m not sure Was it a tad overly melodramatic Of course It was written in 1778 after all But I loved the women issues Georgiana raises and her subtle feminist viewpoint Plus, I always love how an epistolary novel lends itself to such ambiguity since the narrators are usually so unreliable Julia Stanley is no exception to this general rule. |Download Book ♤ The Sylph ♂ The Duchess of Devonshire s second book, first published in , chronicles the life of a young, newly married lady of high society not unlike its author Written in epistolary format, the story follows Julia from her idyllic country life to her marriage to a rich aristocrat She soon discovers her husband is nothing other than a rake, spending all his and her money on gambling and mistresses Without the protection of a husband, soon others come on the scene, intent on taking advantatge of young and naive Julia An anonymous guardian, in the guise of The Sylph, writes to her, giving her guidance through her troublesbut will it be enough Buddy read with Kim. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers To view it, click here The first thing to remember about this book is that the author must have been about 19 or 20 when she wrote it The second thing to remember is that she was after Queen Elizabeth 1st Britain s first real celebrity It was published in 1778 when she was just 21 years old, but had already been married to the Duke of Devonshire for 4 years.Within this context, and assuming she had no real guidance or editorial help, the work is exceptionally good Georgiana s characterisation is well expressed th The first thing to remember about this book is that the author must have been about 19 or 20 when she wrote it The second thing to remember is that she was after Queen Elizabeth 1st Britain s first real celebrity It was published in 1778 when she was just 21 years old, but had already been married to the Duke of Devonshire for 4 years.Within this context, and assuming she had no real guidance or editorial help, the work is exceptionally good Georgiana s characterisation is well expressed through a series of letter between different parties, which I think was a popular style of writing novels at the time The story is complex and surprising, but a little too diluted at times I would have preferredevidence of a stronger attachment between Julia and the Baron for instance.At other times 2 in particular the author goes into excruciating detail in side stories about her father and the Baron These were far too long, detailed, and mostly superfluous I think these are some examples of where a stronger hand in editing would have helped It is just terribly sad to me that the author did not experience her own happy ending in real life like her protagonist, Julia, did What Georgiana made clear was that a woman of that day and age could only really be free of marriage no matter how bad the marriage and no matter how revolting the husband through death of the spouse A man could divorce his wife but a woman could not divorce her husband and either way she could not have access to her children thereafter.I am sure that Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire, did not wish her Duke dead but I am also sure that given the options available to women today, the relationship would have ended sooner rather than later in divorce and freedom for her This one s pretty cheap on Kindle and definitely worth a read if you are interested in either the history of Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire who wrote this book during the early years of her marriage or eighteenth century culture The novel covers the early days of a young heroine named Julia s marriage and how her new husband a fashionable man of society disappoints her It s a pretty good response really as novels go to the letters of Chesterfield which caused such controversy during th This one s pretty cheap on Kindle and definitely worth a read if you are interested in either the history of Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire who wrote this book during the early years of her marriage or eighteenth century culture The novel covers the early days of a young heroine named Julia s marriage and how her new husband a fashionable man of society disappoints her It s a pretty good response really as novels go to the letters of Chesterfield which caused such controversy during the eighteenth century with their licentiousness and lessons in how to behave as a gentleman.The gentlemen in the novel, of course, aren t gentlemen at all as we d perceive them Rather they are all fops of the worst order, overly concerned with fashion, desperately in debt, dishonest and sleeping around far too much It s a good read, and Julia, thank goodness, gets her happy ending ultimately so worth persevering with