(((Download Kindle))) ↝ The Road To Wigan Pier ↿ PDF eBook or Kindle ePUB free

Alright Georgie I get what you re saying, being poor in the 30s was really fucking awful I loved the way you wrote about the industrialisation of the north of England and your views on a Socialism and the such but ugh why did you write this one so unenjoyably It felt like I was reading a 200 page Guardian column I had to force myself through certain parts, not because they were boring or anything but because of the way you went about writing this thing The content is A but the experience Alright Georgie I get what you re saying, being poor in the 30s was really fucking awful I loved the way you wrote about the industrialisation of the north of England and your views on a Socialism and the such but ugh why did you write this one so unenjoyably It felt like I was reading a 200 page Guardian column I had to force myself through certain parts, not because they were boring or anything but because of the way you went about writing this thing The content is A but the experience of reading it gets you an F Why didn t you write this like Down and Out It s a pity Georgie A pity (((Download Kindle))) ☠ The Road To Wigan Pier ↿ A searing account of George Orwell s experiences of working class life in the bleak industrial heartlands of Yorkshire and Lancashire, The Road to Wigan Pier is a brilliant and bitter polemic that has lost none of its political impact over time His graphically unforgettable descriptions of social injustice, slum housing, mining conditions, squalor, hunger and growing unemployment are written with unblinking honesty, fury and great humanity I am a degenerate modern semi intellectual who would die if I did not get my early morning cup of tea and my New Statesman every Friday Clearly I do not, in a sense, want to return to a simpler, harder, probably agricultural way of life In the same sense I don t want to cut down on my drinking, to pay my debts, to take enough exercise, to be faithful to my wife, etc etc But in another andpermanent sense I do want these things, and perhaps in the same sense I want a civilization inI am a degenerate modern semi intellectual who would die if I did not get my early morning cup of tea and my New Statesman every Friday Clearly I do not, in a sense, want to return to a simpler, harder, probably agricultural way of life In the same sense I don t want to cut down on my drinking, to pay my debts, to take enough exercise, to be faithful to my wife, etc etc But in another andpermanent sense I do want these things, and perhaps in the same sense I want a civilization in which progress is not definable as making the world safe for little fat menGeorge Orwell, The Road to Wigan Pier This is one of those pieces of writing that cause my wife to shudder because I end up stalking her around our home quoting ad nausium paragraph after paragraph Orwell is fantastically precient, clear, and direct His writing hits you like a boulder to the head This book proves it is just as dangerous to be theoretically on the same side as Orwell as it is to be in direct opposition He is not afraid to loose the scabs off of friend or foe, and will pick with relish at ALL hypocrisy, ALL lazy thinking, and ALL moral pretense Probably the greatest tribute that can be dropped at the feet of Orwell are the acolytes he produced One doesn t need to go too much further than Chris Hitchens or Andrew Sullivan to find writers whose style, attitude, and flourish were directly influenced by Orwell s anti ecumenical, anti fascist voice I ve recently read quite a few books by George Orwell The Clergyman s Daughter, Coming Up For Air, Keep and The Aspidistra Flying , having previously read Nineteen Eighty Four, Animal Farm and Homage to Catalonia, and am rapidly coming to the conclusion that he s one of my favourite writers This was only the second time I ve sampled his non fiction Before I discuss my thoughts on the book I want to mention how much I enjoy Orwell s writing style In his essay Politics and the English Language I ve recently read quite a few books by George Orwell The Clergyman s Daughter, Coming Up For Air, Keep and The Aspidistra Flying , having previously read Nineteen Eighty Four, Animal Farm and Homage to Catalonia, and am rapidly coming to the conclusion that he s one of my favourite writers This was only the second time I ve sampled his non fiction Before I discuss my thoughts on the book I want to mention how much I enjoy Orwell s writing style In his essay Politics and the English Language 1946 , Orwell wrote about the importance of precise and clear language, and provides six rules for writers Never use a metaphor, simile or other figure of speech which you are used to seeing in print Never use a long word where a short one will do If it is possible to cut a word out, always cut it out Never use the passive where you can use the active Never use a foreign phrase, a scientific word or a jargon word if you can think of an everyday English equivalent Break any of these rules sooner than say anything outright barbarous.These rules seem to me to inform his style that I perceive to be simple and powerful.Onto the book itself, in the first half of The Road to Wigan Pier, Orwell catalogues the poverty he encounters in the north of England during the depression of the 1930s In the second half, and written whilst Fascism is on the rise in Europe, he outlines his Socialist solution.Orwell appears to be unfailingly honest both about what he encounters amongst the poor families of the north of England his description of the Brookers boarding house is powerful and evocative and his own prejudices A word on his prejudices, he refers to homosexuals as pansies and discusses the cranks that gravitate towards Socialism which include in his words fruit juice drinkers, nudists, sandal wearers, sex maniacs, Quakers, nature cure quacks, feminists and vegetarians He is honest enough, elsewhere in the book, to acknowledge the difficulty anyone encounters trying to escape their social background these prejudices suggest to me he was, in some respects, a very traditional person I think this self awareness makes himendearing and probablyclear sighted whilst also jarring with me, as I fall into at least two of his crank categories A lot of his thoughts and observations still resonated with me as a reader in 2012 Specifically his ideas on class prejudice and language That said, I think he was also fairly naive when he wrote this book His political education would continue in Spain, as documented in Homage to Catalonia, when he would fight a real war against Fascism, and where he encountered Russian propaganda and the rivalries between the various Republican factions I would recommend reading the two books back to back.I preferred the first half of the book, with its clear eyed depictions of poverty, which isinteresting than his political musings in the second half The second half is interesting, but his tendency to repeat himself, his personal prejudices and his political naivety, undermine this half of the book That said, it s well worth reading for anyone interested in the era, or in Orwell s writing I find both fascinating The Road to Wigan Pier FAQs Back in the days when I hung out in that other dimension called usenet, I wrote several FAQS for alt.books.george orwell alas, now dead, a repository for villainous spam RIPQ A with George Orwell B Will you tell us about the Brookers, the people with whom you stayed for a while in Wigan O Of course mind if I smoke Mrs Brooker was too ill to do anything except eat stupendous meals, and Mr Brooker was a dark, small boned, sour, Irish looking man, and ast The Road to Wigan Pier FAQs Back in the days when I hung out in that other dimension called usenet, I wrote several FAQS for alt.books.george orwell alas, now dead, a repository for villainous spam RIPQ A with George Orwell B Will you tell us about the Brookers, the people with whom you stayed for a while in Wigan O Of course mind if I smoke Mrs Brooker was too ill to do anything except eat stupendous meals, and Mr Brooker was a dark, small boned, sour, Irish looking man, and astonishingly dirty I don t think I ever once saw his hands clean If he gave you a slice of bread and butter there was always a black thumb print on it At any hour of the day you were liable to meet Mr Brooker on the stairs, carrying a full chamber pot which he gripped with his thumb well over the rim The most dreadful thing about people like the Brookers is the way they say the same things over and over again It gives you the feeling that they are not real people at all, but a kind of ghost They kept a tripe shop flocculent stuff They were the kind of people who run a business chiefly in order to have something to grumble about The place was filthy hanging from the ceiling there was a heavy glass chandelier on which the dust was so thick that it was like fur Generally the crumbs from breakfast were still on the table at supper I used to get to know individual crumbs by sight and watch their progress up and down the table from day to day I never saw anyone brave the marmalade jar, which was an unspeakable mass of stickiness and dust Last year s dead bluebottles were supine in the shop window not good for trade B Curious How long do bugs stay in a house O Till the crack of doom B And, above all, what do you feel there is no need of O To have unemptied chamber pots standing about in your living room B Briefly then, can you tell us what it s like in a coal mine O The place is like hell B Could you please define hell O Heat, noise, confusion, darkness, foul air, and, also above all unbearably cramped space B I ve always wondered what coal is used for, besides finding it in my stocking on Christmas mornings O Let me list them for you For eating an ice In crossing the Atlantic When baking a loaf In writing a novel In all the arts of peace if war breaks out it is needed all theIn times of revolution and in times of reaction In order that Hitler may march the goose step That the Pope may denounce Bolshevism That the cricket crowds may assemble at Lords That the poets may scratch one another s backs B And pray tell, who might owe the decency of their lives to those poor drudges who work underground O I ll tell you who you and I the editor of the Times Lit Supp the poets the Archbishop of Canterbury comrade X, author of Marxism for Infants B All of us O Yes B If coal could not be produced without pregnant women dragging it to and fro, should we let them O I fancy we should let them do it rather than deprive ourselves of coal B When did you realise what splendid men miners are O It is only when you see miners down the mine and naked that you realise what splendid men they are Most of them are small big men are at a disadvantage in that job but nearly all of them have the most noble bodies wide shoulders tapering to slender supple waists, and small pronounced buttocks and sinewy thighs, with not an ounce of waste flesh anywhere In the hotter mines they wear only a pair of thin drawers, clogs and knee padsB The splendour of their bodies comes to mind O Yes, very much B But, where are the monstrous men with chests like barrels and moustaches like the wings of eagles who strode across your child hood s gaze twenty or thirty years ago O Buried, I suppose, in the Flanders mud If the English physique has declined, this is no doubt partly due to the fact that the Great War carefully selected the million best men in England and slaughtered them, largely before they had had time to breed.B That reminds me, did you ever habitually allow yourself to be dressed and undressed by a Burmese boy O Oh yes B And youwhat were you like as a teen O When I was fourteen or fifteen I was an odious little snob B Lawrence says that because you have been to a public school you are a eunuch O Well, what about it B Umm, moving on, where was the silliest and worst delivered lecture you have ever heard or ever expect to hear O Actually it was in Sheffield I was taken to a public hall to listen to a lecture by a clergyman B Did your feet carry you out, seemingly of their own accord, before it was half way through O Yes indeed, how did you know B Well, I ve read your book By the way, who is the master in a middle class home O The woman, or the baby B Mr Orwell, let s get to the big question What is a human being O Odd question, but, primarily a bag for putting food into the other functions and faculties may begodlike, but in point of time they come afterwards B True And who are the laziest people in Europe O The English B What sums up the normal English attitude towards the Latin races O Ha ha olives, vines, and vices B Besides always telling the truth, you are known for predicting the future So, what will life be like in the Utopian future , in two hundred years from now O There won t be a coal fire in the grate, only some kind of invisible heater The furniture will be made of rubber, glass, and steel If there are still such things as evening papers there will certainly be no racing news in them, for gambling will be meaningless in a world where there is no poverty and the horse will have vanished from the face of the earth Dogs, too, will have been suppressed on grounds of hygiene And there won t be so many children, either, if the birth controllers have their way B What is your view on hanging O I watched a man hanged once it seemed to me worse than a thousand murders I never went into a jail without feeling most visitors to jails feel the same that my place was on the other side of the bars I thought then I think now, for that matter that the worst criminal who ever walked is morally superior to a hanging judge B Is it true that the middle class person who is an ardent Socialist at twenty five is a sniffish Conservative at thirty five O One can observe on every side that dreary phenomenon B What sort of person is drawn to Socialism O One sometimes gets the impression that the mere words Socialism and Communism draw towards them with magnetic force every fruit juice drinker, nudist, sandal wearer, sex maniac, Quaker, Nature Cure quack, pacifist, and feminist in England B Can bad breathe be a problem O You can have an affection for a murderer or a sodomite, but you cannot have an affection for a man whose breath stinks B What does the high standard of life we enjoy depend upon O Under the capitalist system, in order that we may live in comparative comfort, a hundred million Indians must live on the verge of starvation an evil state of affairs, but you acquiesce in it every time you step into a taxi or eat a plate of strawberries and cream B Do you have anything to say about the rage against the machine O The sensitive person s hostility to the machine is in one sense unrealistic, because of the obvious fact that the machine has come to stay But as an attitude of mind there is a great deal to be said for it The machine has got to be accepted, but it is probably better to accept it rather as one accepts a drug that is, grudgingly and suspiciously Like a drug, the machine is useful, dangerous, and habit forming The oftener one surrenders to it the tighter its grip becomes You have only to look about you at this moment to realise with what sinister speed the machine is getting us into its power B Yet aren t machine made things cheaper O Look at the filthy chemical by product that people will pour down their throats under the name of beer Wherever you look you will see some slick machine made article triumphing over the old fashioned article that still tastes of something other than sawdust And what applies to food applies also to furniture, houses, clothes, books, amusements, and everything else that makes up our environment B Yes, sometimes I hate this age O You may hate the machine civilisation, probably you are right to hate it, but for the present there can be no question of accepting or rejecting it B Are you too affected by the machine O Give a Western man a job of work and he immediately begins devising a machine that would do it for him give him a machine and he thinks of ways of improving it I understand this tendency well enough, for in an ineffectual sort of way I have that type of mind myself I have not either the patience or the mechanical skill to devise any machine that would work, but I am perpetually seeing, as it were, the ghosts of possible machines that might save me the trouble of using my brain or muscles B Ah the ghost in the machine Wasn t it YOU, in fact, who invented the internet O This is a misconception I do believe the rumour started because as you well know a search on google for Orwell modem yields hundreds of results Perhaps this will finally end today and maybe the other rumours will end as well like the one about me and a certain Lyons comer house I could multiply examples by the score on this sort of thing B Orwell cat coke is one of my favourites Well, thank you sir, and R.I.P O At any rate, it s back to Sutton Courtenay B. This is a book of two halves The second half from chapter eight onwards is autobiographical and explains how his life and experience led him to the experiences of the first half, as he says the road from Mandalay to Wigan is a long one and the reasons for taking it are not immediately clear p.106 , the suggestion is that this book is a prosaic response to Kipling s poem The Road to Mandalay., from empire to domestic politics, from Imperialism to Socialism His approach to the latter and the pu This is a book of two halves The second half from chapter eight onwards is autobiographical and explains how his life and experience led him to the experiences of the first half, as he says the road from Mandalay to Wigan is a long one and the reasons for taking it are not immediately clear p.106 , the suggestion is that this book is a prosaic response to Kipling s poem The Road to Mandalay., from empire to domestic politics, from Imperialism to Socialism His approach to the latter and the purpose of his journey oddly brutal, the accountancy of human suffering Before committing yourself to socialism, he says, you have to see suffering for yourself and decide if it is tolerable, which rather suggests that potentially a disinterested observer might add up the sum of human misery and conclude that it s not that bad and no reason to change direction politically.The key here I feel who Orwell is writing for He was commissioned to write this book for the Left Book Club of Seecker and Warburg which had been set up in 1936 with the intention of energising British left wing politics Orwell s Road to Wigan Pier came out the following year in 1937 I was shocked by it for two reasons, the first the absolute basic points he is trying to make such aswhat I saw in her face was not the ignorant suffering of an animal p17 , Orwell feels it is necessary to tell his readers that working class women are human, he feels for his readership this is an arresting thought the poor, the unemployed, the generally down trodden, can be regarded as sub human We might feel the micro graduation of British class play a role here, Orwell describes himself as coming from the lower upper middle class, people who he explains have just enough money to enable them to feel snobby and superior People of lower social class are physically repellent They smell And indeed now and then you can notice generally in Orwell s writing a peculiar horror of the unclean, the dirty, and of physical contact with other people who might not have been dipped in carbolic.The other unexpected shock here in the description of the effects of mass unemployment in the North West of England in the 1930s is how this book might have been used to design much current social misery What do we need to have to achieve human suffering housing crisis, insecure employment, inadequate social insurance, oh, but don t forget tasty cheap foods that are grossly unhealthy and plenty of gambling Plus ca change, plus c est la m me chose Much like Hemingway s lost satchel or Genet s samizdat manuscripts, I ll piece this together from jumbled memories How s that for hubris The Road To Wigan Pier was amongst the best books I ve read this year The route established by Orwell issinuous than expected He examines a lodging house and then travels to the pits themselves He finds valor in those who toil He doesn t patronize He ponders the unemployment issue in England He busts myths He unrolls lengths of statistics He the Much like Hemingway s lost satchel or Genet s samizdat manuscripts, I ll piece this together from jumbled memories How s that for hubris The Road To Wigan Pier was amongst the best books I ve read this year The route established by Orwell issinuous than expected He examines a lodging house and then travels to the pits themselves He finds valor in those who toil He doesn t patronize He ponders the unemployment issue in England He busts myths He unrolls lengths of statistics He then concludes his book by meandering back and forth between the theoretical and the autobiographical It is easy to see how this spurned readers, both then and now My reasons for reading this now were related on Hadrian s Wall sorry I couldn t resist but Orwell s book did serve as a pleasurable counterpoint to my own holiday experiences Set in two distinctive parts I found the first to be the most interesting Orwell painted a bleak picture of conditions for miners in the north of England The working class didn t have it easy by any means Dangerous working conditions, poor pay and even lesser prospects.and then there were the slums Visual and descriptive writing Also enjoyed what Orwell had to say about some of his fellow authors and his take on world affairs Interesting and informative. The squalid living and working conditions of 1930s Northern miners A tract on socialism Classic Georgie. In the first half of The Road to Wigan Pier, Orwell catalogues his participant observation of the economically deprived North of England focusing on squalor, pollution and hardship during the Depression Wigan Pier is a dystopic bleak vision of degrading capitalism without his study, 1984 would not have existed As political polemic in the second half, he provides the solution Socialism Orwell, fully aware of his own upper middle class prejudices, set to challenge his own feelings of disgust In the first half of The Road to Wigan Pier, Orwell catalogues his participant observation of the economically deprived North of England focusing on squalor, pollution and hardship during the Depression Wigan Pier is a dystopic bleak vision of degrading capitalism without his study, 1984 would not have existed As political polemic in the second half, he provides the solution Socialism Orwell, fully aware of his own upper middle class prejudices, set to challenge his own feelings of disgust for the working classes he was educated to believe that they smell His description of the Brookers boarding house is a wonderfully Dickensian gothic and grotesque description of squalor and disappointed lives illustrating that dirt and disgust is what stands in the way of socialism s triumph I was tickled by Orwell s greater repulsion for the bearded fruit juice drinking middle class socialist crank who wants to level the working class up up to his own standard by means of hygienebirth control, poetry In essence, Wigan Pier is a confession of Orwell s own failings he knows he cannot resolve the class problem by being friends with the working classes he is an outsider Orwell is also seeringly honest about his own feelings of masculine inferiority regarding his repulsion attraction for the superhuman miners I admire Wigan Pier because I recognise my own hypocrisies in the way Orwell tries to abolish that part of himself he came to abhor as being an instrument of the British Empire in India We are all guilty of class prejudice