!Free Kindle ♪ The Morning Deluge I: From Mao's Childhood to The Long March ♊ PDF or E-pub free

!Free Kindle ♓ The Morning Deluge I: From Mao's Childhood to The Long March ♚ Volume I of The Morning Deluge covers the period from the childhood of Mao Tsetung to the Long March Volume II, also available in Panther Books, continues the history of China and the life of Mao up to the Korean War Dry in patches, but really gripping in others This takes this fantastic series of biography up to 1949. This book is the first volume of a two volume biography and is itselfdivided into two parts Dr Han SuYin s talent with words, after all she is a writer not a historian, and her sympathetic view of the revolutionary leader makes this biography a real joy to read Nevertheless the reader should be warned that her account adheres to the official narrative even when historical documents suggest that Mao occasionally made strategic bad calls I refer in particular to the role played by the Cominter This book is the first volume of a two volume biography and is itselfdivided into two parts Dr Han SuYin s talent with words, after all she is a writer not a historian, and her sympathetic view of the revolutionary leader makes this biography a real joy to read Nevertheless the reader should be warned that her account adheres to the official narrative even when historical documents suggest that Mao occasionally made strategic bad calls I refer in particular to the role played by the Comintern and the dramatic events that took place in 1927 and the fact that, as early as 1925 at the August Plenum Ch en Tu hsiuhad proposed that the Chinese Communist Party withdraw from the Kuomingtang KMT , while Mao continued his collaboration until Fall 1927 Between Februaryand September of 1927, the forces of counterrevolution were released byChiang Kai shek In April, Chiang carried out the massacre of the Shanghaiworkers True, Stalin continued to support the united front Chinese Communist Parti and KMT for another five months, but the tragedy was prolonged by Mao s adventurism She sticks to the official version that communication between Moscow and the Chinese Communist Party was complicated by a language barrier, communist cadres psychological dependence on Moscow, and blames Borodin, the Russian ambassador, for misjudging the situation on the ground and failing to timely inform Stalin about the KMT betrayal But Mao was a Marxist and had enough theoretical and analytical tools at his disposal to understand that a communist leader shouldn t rely on telegraph messages to make a strategic decision One shouldn t gloss over the terrible loss of lives that followed the decision to arm peasants so that they could take cities at a time when the KMT had already betrayed the revolution Nevertheless Dr Han s book on Mao remains one of the most engaging and best written accounts of Mao s life i have read