@FREE Í The Master of Go õ eBook or E-pub free

This is my first meeting with Kawabata and I believe is not the last I had some emotions when I began reading I didn t know the author s style, I had no idea about the game still in the same place But I came to understand that the story is not about the game of go, but about the clash of two generations, of two we can say civilisations I am a traditionalist and I also love Japanese civilisation, their respect for tradition, for elders, for family and for others Of course their tradi This is my first meeting with Kawabata and I believe is not the last I had some emotions when I began reading I didn t know the author s style, I had no idea about the game still in the same place But I came to understand that the story is not about the game of go, but about the clash of two generations, of two we can say civilisations I am a traditionalist and I also love Japanese civilisation, their respect for tradition, for elders, for family and for others Of course their tradition chaged a bit, but they integrate the new, they naturalize it in their own way It s almost like this game which is, originally a Chinese one and only after 10 centuries it enters in Japan and becomes an Art I was always on the meijin s side When in train there was a game between the journalist and the American, we can understand the difference between the two cultures the respect and the good sense on one side and the aggressivness and the spirit of warrior who has to win no matter what and how on the other hand Following the game between the meijing and Otake 7 dan, it was like, almost, you were the witness of the clash of tradition and modernity One could feel how some good things, attitudes and ideas died I think it s the case all over the world and a lot deeper than it is in Japan I loved this book It is a must reading With no such intention in mind, I rather fell out of the frying pan on this one I had to get away from Yourcenar and a glance at the shelves made me think nothing could be further from Hadrian than a book about Go.My very first Go move, and it s a mistake Continue here With no such intention in mind, I rather fell out of the frying pan on this one I had to get away from Yourcenar and a glance at the shelves made me think nothing could be further from Hadrian than a book about Go.My very first Go move, and it s a mistake Continue here @FREE È The Master of Go ⚣ Go is a game of strategy in which two players attempt to surround each other s black or white stones Simple in its fundamentals, infinitely complex in its execution, Go is an essential expression of the Japanese spirit And in his fictional chronicle of a match played between a revered and heretofore invincible Master and a younger and modern challenger, Yasunari Kawabata captured the moment in which the immutable traditions of imperial Japan met the onslaught of the twentieth century How Kawabata combines a journalistic narrative voice with such a rich literary tradition baffles methan the intricate game of Go and it s complex representation of the structural game in society the novel is supposed to explore, and what a beautiful structure Kawabata takes us through, peeling such thin layers of meaning with each inflection and each crafty Go move between the classic master and the iconoclast challenger. EDIT I wonder, would a pun like be acceptable A masterpiece, perhaps all of Kawabata s sentiments crammed into one book rather than an observation of a Go match Though Kawabata s ideals doesn t strike me as those which are sensible, for some reason this book touches medeeply than I ve ever expected.After reading this, I thought as if for a moment, I could understand the reasons behind his suicide Another one sitting read 4 stars, 1 personal star. How does a book about a go game win the Nobel Prize for Literature Actually, the book itself didn t win the prize Kawabata the author did, but this book is widely regarded as his best, and probably the one that sealed the Nobel for him You have to read this book to understand what it s really like It s a semi fictional chronicle of an actual game between a revered reigning master and a rising young champion destined to unseat him Yes, I just spoiled the ending, but it s pretty much given How does a book about a go game win the Nobel Prize for Literature Actually, the book itself didn t win the prize Kawabata the author did, but this book is widely regarded as his best, and probably the one that sealed the Nobel for him You have to read this book to understand what it s really like It s a semi fictional chronicle of an actual game between a revered reigning master and a rising young champion destined to unseat him Yes, I just spoiled the ending, but it s pretty much given away in the beginning, and the plot of this novel is not about who wins the game It is based on an actual game and actual figures in the go world, as Yasunari Kawabata, a go reporter, wrote about it in serialized form in 1938.Go is often described as a metaphor for life, God, the soul of Japan, a game with infinitely layered meanings as complex as the universe itself I have dallied with go myself and love the game, though I m a piss poor player and not even close to being good enough to appreciate deep strategy at the level necessary to read a player s personality and innermost feelings from a single move Kawabata, an amateur as he repeatedly reminds us, but still pretty good by amateur standards and familiar enough with the game to report on it for Japanese newspapers, describes not just the game between the Master and his challenger, Otake, but how it reflects the arc of their personalities and the Master s past and Otake s future The game takes place over a period of six months, with elaborate formal rules, frequently renegotiated the negotiations being one source of conflict and stress , concerning how many days break will take place between each day of play, and how many hours will be spent playing This is not a game like you or I would play sitting down at a table for an afternoon These two men sit down at the board and spend anywhere from 40 minutes to 3 hours contemplating their next move, and might play five stones between them in an afternoon, then retire for a few days or in some cases, because of health issues, weeks.So, from whence comes the drama and conflict in this slow, thoughtful game Needless to say there is no violence, no upturned boards or people drawing swords This was 1938, not 1638 It comes from the author s observations about go, about the personalities, about how go has changed as Japan is changing There is much description of rooms and landscapes and trees and weather, minute and delicate details which I ve noticed to be a common feature in Japanese novels There is also a great deal of profiling of the two men At one point, we learn that the Master is angry infuriated, even But he doesn t show this by raising his voice or even changing his expression It s expressed when, back in his room, he politely shakes his head over his opponent s play and discusses forfeiting He s indignant when he believes that his opponent used a tactic of sorts to call it a trick would be too strong to gain time during a recess between sessions to think about his next move.It s almost impossible to explain why this is a source of indignation if you don t know anything about go, and even if you do, it s still a little opaque to an amateur Westerner like me Reading this book, you are getting a deep, nuanced view of very traditional Japanese mindsets at a time of great change, when the country and the world was moving beneath them This one game is like a pond showing the ripples And keeping in mind that not being Japanese, not being a master go player, and reading a translation, you re really seeing third hand ripples reflected through a fuzzy lens And yet you can still follow Kawabata s thoughts and see the contrast between the Master and his opponent.I wish, as I wished when I read Hikaru no Go, that I was good enough to look at a single move and appreciate its sublime brilliance, or how it casts a shadow over the board, or why go professionals can study and discuss one move and its many long reaching implications and how it indicates that the player is aggressive, weak, uncertain, reckless, subtle, devious, or resolved, etc The Master of Go is not exciting You have to ease your mind into it It s like staring at a painting by a master you know you re looking at something brilliant but the degree to which you can apprehend the brilliance may be somewhat limited Yet though the story is merely an account of a go game and the formal social manuevering surrounding it , there is a slow building of tension to a climax no less satisfying for your knowing how it ends It s a very literary novel and if you don t like Japanese literature, you probably won t like this book However, while an appreciation for go will enhance your enjoyment of it, you don t need to know the game to read this book They could as easily be playing some other game think of it as Vulcan checkers and you d still get the same sensory impressions and characterizations from play even not having a clue about the rules The book does include diagrams of the game as it progresses, though go students still study this game as one of the classics It s a quintessentially Japanese book, but I found the translation quite accessible I know that both go mastery and Japanese fluency would make it infinitelyaccessible, though 3.5 starsI ve just read an interesting article in The Japan Times entitled An exploration of the great game at the heart of the Master of Go by Tyler Rothmar, informing his readers that the battle took place nearly six months and the victor finalized exactly 78 years ago today December 4, 2016 If you d like to read the JT article, please visit this web page Reading this novel by Kawabata is, I think, a bit different from reading his other three, n 3.5 starsI ve just read an interesting article in The Japan Times entitled An exploration of the great game at the heart of the Master of Go by Tyler Rothmar, informing his readers that the battle took place nearly six months and the victor finalized exactly 78 years ago today December 4, 2016 If you d like to read the JT article, please visit this web page Reading this novel by Kawabata is, I think, a bit different from reading his other three, namely, Snow Country , Thousand Cranes , and The Sound of the Mountain One of the reasons is that it primarily focuses on the ultimate Go competition between the Master Shusai and the challenger Otake of the Seventh Rank from June 26, 1938 in Tokyo to December 4 in Ito p 4 The match was amazingly tactical, highly professional and horribly fierce to the extent that, due to his age, health and frailty, he finally gave in for Black 237, the last play by his opponent p 6, diagram p 177 I ve known vaguely about this famous Japanese Go since years ago with admiration because, as far as I know, those playing well deserve respects for their wisdom in planning that includes tactics in his defending as well as attacking However, I m not a Go player and I wonder which needs higher skills between playing Go or chess, and again, what kind of chess Then, in this context, we d be content with the country, that is, Japan since, I think, it s not fair or sensible to compare between a master of Japanese Go and a master of, say, Thai chess.Therefore, I read this book as a Go illiterate outsider curious of such a faithful chronicle novel p v and found his writing style surprising due to its 41 chapters of various length Moreover, this chronicle depicts an unthinkable Go competition in its presumably national scale as waged by fate dictating the two Go warriors who use the Go board as their battlefield till 2.42 p.m on December 4, 1938 p 6 So we merely read their fighting moves, for each having different time intervals as controled by the judges, the youth keeping the records and witnessed by the functionaries Moreover, there re two sets of small numbered stones Black 1, Black 3, Black, 3 Black 237 for Otake vs White 2, White 4, White 6 White 236 for the Master We can see how they start the decisive match on the chess like Go board denoted by lines 1 19 row and letters A T across There, Otake s started at R 16 while the Master s followed at R 4 p 36.I came across a remark stating that the first player has seven chances in ten of winning p 57 I think this is a good remark from Go experts that need pondering and applying from both the challenger and the master It s quite fair to allowluck chance for an opponent while a master with his charismatic, godlike stature should be satisfied due to his sublime Go skills Indeed, I think if the Master could play Go and happily lost, like Sakine, Master of Chess, he could have enjoyed living longer.This is not a romantic novel like the other three mentioned above, instead it s a novel like story of such spine chilling Go competitions I m sorry I don t understand the description of the diagram on page 177, that is, I can t find Black 201 and 203 B 13 and C 13 Therefore, I d appreciate my GR friends information explanation on the matter.Finally, from Chapter 40, I m a bit disappointed due to its lack of action words from the great victor Otake, so I guess he may have spoken humbly, if need be, in honour of the Master Certainly, the Master rightly deserves our respects for his graceful, heroic final mission Onething we need to take care, any serious match can be fatal, taking the middle way or being resilient should be the key to our success satisfaction in our daily lives Comparatively, Otake is the opponent the Master can see and plan to play the game, however, it s better if we d rather have a few challenging us in the open for the face to face battle so that we know who they are and keep this in mind too YouTube.com has videos of people explaining how to play Go, so that is where I went to watch to prepare myself for this book.That was edifying The Master of Go is an acclaimed book, recognized in several countries as a masterpiece However, it is NOT edifying.A sick dying old man, a master of Go, plays an epic game against a young modern man It is moved to various inns in Japan Seasons pass, weather changes, illness comes and goes, negotiations stop the progress of the game, reporters eagerl YouTube.com has videos of people explaining how to play Go, so that is where I went to watch to prepare myself for this book.That was edifying The Master of Go is an acclaimed book, recognized in several countries as a masterpiece However, it is NOT edifying.A sick dying old man, a master of Go, plays an epic game against a young modern man It is moved to various inns in Japan Seasons pass, weather changes, illness comes and goes, negotiations stop the progress of the game, reporters eagerly follow the play week after week The players meet about every three days, play can take 19 hours or three, and they might move one stone on the board or 20 moves Often after a stone is moved, the opponent might take four hours of studying the board before making an answering move Conversation between moves may occur, or not Frequent bathroom trips indicate the tension The Master s heart causes him frequent pain and he appears to be swollen in body, despite rarely eating The author provides pictures of the moves on the game board The narrator, a reporter who admires the Master, is brought to tears several times after desultory conversations with the Master despite the vagueness of the Master s responses The game takes half a year to finish The Master of Go was written after WWII, but the action of the novel takes place in 1938 in Japan It s supposed to be a heartfelt exploration of old values vs new, Art vs expertise, or in other words, tradition vs change Some even thought it obliquely was about the USA vs Japan in fighting the war.All I was thinking was how manypages must I struggle through until I finished the book.I was supposed to see or feel something, like a quiet realization of internal reverence, and a sense or feeling that a better way of existence is slipping away into the past Instead I read on and on of two men glaring at each other, who occasionally take a break to sip tea and a walk The old man stares maturely while the young man blinks with youthful vigor Then one of them places a game piece down on a grid I turned another page Six months pass Oh, I did pick up the narrator s respectful sorrow The narrator is an observing reporter The reporter is quietly dazzled and shocked by depths of emotion the reporter somehow felt when looking at the stone faces of the players as they sit over the Go board The feeling of the reporter was that of experiencing universal truths revealed What I actually felt was these men had created a bubble of in significance over a board game through misplaced numinous grandiosity.I don t know Maybe that was the author s point Kawabata writes a factual account of a Go match, which at one level could be compared with the sort of journalism you see in a magazine like New in Chess He presents all the moves in the game, and comments the play Somehow he turns it into an emotionally gripping meditation on life, art, fate and the inevitable destruction of traditional Japanese society He apparently thought this was his best book remember that he won the Nobel Prize.It would be easy to say that this is a unique occurrence Kawabata writes a factual account of a Go match, which at one level could be compared with the sort of journalism you see in a magazine like New in Chess He presents all the moves in the game, and comments the play Somehow he turns it into an emotionally gripping meditation on life, art, fate and the inevitable destruction of traditional Japanese society He apparently thought this was his best book remember that he won the Nobel Prize.It would be easy to say that this is a unique occurrence but in fact, I think board games journalists are undervalued and Kawabata just happens to be the only one who s received any broader recognition For example, Gena Sosonko is not as good, but it s not ridiculous either to compare him with Kawabata In his case, he is mourning the vanished chess culture of the old Soviet Union.Another interesting piece of Go lore I picked up from the German guy I was talking with this afternoon Anyone who knows anything about the game can see immediately that Kawabata was a decent player Apparently, he was ratherthan just decent he was strong enough that he once won a three stone handicap game against a 9 Dan professional In chess terms, I d say that s about equivalent to an International Master title Impressive.Now here s a development that s seriously confused my understanding of Kawabata s classic novel A few days ago, Not and I watched the rather fine movie The Go Master which, it might surprise you, isn t based on this book at all, but is a dramatization of the life of a different player, Go Seigen What s interesting for Kawabata fans is that the two stories intersect in an unexpected way Go Seigen, a genius who is widely believed to be the greatest Go player of the 20th century, also played a match against Honinbo Shusai, the real life prototype for the Master in Kawabata s book Go seemed to be outplaying Shusai throughout, and Shusai, in desperation, resorted to an extremely unethical strategy As the nominally stronger player, he had the right to adjourn the game when he wished, even when it was his turn to play He did this several times, and each time analyzed the position together with his students before resuming In the course of one of one of these adjournments, he found an unexpected move that changed the course of the game and allowed him to snatch a narrow victory It is widely believed that the move was actually found by Shusai s student Maeda, later a top player in his own right Maeda never confirmed or denied the story.Five years later, Shusai played the match against Kitani that was immortalized in The Master of Go Kitani, who was a friend of Go Seigen, naturally wanted to stop the Master from using the method that had worked so well for him in the previous match In the face of considerable opposition, he required, and eventually obtained, a modification of the adjournment rule based on Western chess praxis The player who wished to adjourn had to seal their move , writing it down and putting it in a sealed envelope at the end of the playing session, so that both players would be on an even footing As Kawabata recounts in the novel, Kitani understood the implications of the Western style adjournment rule better than Shusai At a critical juncture, he played a trivial forcing move to gain time to think, and this won him the game I have read the novel three times, and I believed it was clear that Kawabata was presenting Kitani s pragmatic action as unworthy and almost despicable This seemed strange, since he is always referred to very positively in the Japanese Go literature But now, knowing the background, I wonder if there is an ironic level that I have been missing Kawabata, as noted, was a strong amateur Go player It is inconceivable that he would not have been familiar with all the details of the earlier game between Go Seigen and Shusai, where Shusai had behaved in a farunderhand way than Kitani ever did Basically, Shusai had it coming and everyone would have known this.Is there anyone here who s read the book in the original and can comment Two stones.two individuals One game..one world The yin yang philosophies sprouting from the wooden bowls on to a 19 x 19 arena The small stones carrying the burden of altering destinies In the realm of sh setsu, Kawabata chronicles a factual reportage of a decisive championship game of Go held in 1938, between Honnimb Sh sai and Mr Kitano Minora Abiding the culture of literary fiction, Kawabata confers fabricated identities to the players as well as to himself Mr Uragami in this Two stones.two individuals One game..one world The yin yang philosophies sprouting from the wooden bowls on to a 19 x 19 arena The small stones carrying the burden of altering destinies In the realm of sh setsu, Kawabata chronicles a factual reportage of a decisive championship game of Go held in 1938, between Honnimb Sh sai and Mr Kitano Minora Abiding the culture of literary fiction, Kawabata confers fabricated identities to the players as well as to himself Mr Uragami in this epic struggle that spans over the period of nearly six months Title holder Honnimb Sh sai s last official game , his opponent being the 7th Class Mr KitaniThe game of Go is simple in its fundamentals and infinitely complex in the execution of them It is not what might be called a game of moves, as chess and checkers IntersectionThe game of Go commences with the stone being placed at the intersection of the vertical and horizontal squares The Black stone always taking the privilege of an opening move The devious tap of the stone on the wooden grid echoes the hysteria of a transitional era New laws and new tactical regulation overruled the aristocratic stubbornness by refined trickery The strategic moves alternating the white and black stones delineated the struggle of aristocracy vs liberalism youth vs old age new vs old and art vs gaming pragmatismShusai the Master would seem in a variety of meanings to have stood at the boundary between the old and the new The frail and ill Master who revered the tradition of Go as a way of life and art , painfully observed the transition of his beloved painting into the commercial entity bound by scientific regulations and competitive aggressiveness An inhabitant of the Meiji Era, the Master finds himself standing on the edge of modernity that challenges traditional s and progress in a strange world with cries for equality Mr Uragami, in his reportage addresses the Japanese landscape that is suspended between the resistance of the old cultural s and the democratic post war revolution The Master who was accustomed to conservative prerogatives struggled to rationalize the tactical moves of his young adversary Mr Otake The unorthodox Black 69 move struck like a spray of black ink spoiling the rhythm of the Master s harmonic artistic play Uragami wonders if the invincible Master was now as feeble as the scrawny legs that marred the authoritative illusion Were the long recesses and the venue changes between the games, a defense from the fury of the Black stones The Black stones were insensitive to the pleas of an aged clamshell stone The exhaustion of insomnia that ravaged the serenity during the four day long recesses was now curious about the loneliness that sprang from the nostalgia of a waning art The frail Master with all his might hung on to the last threads of his invincibilityIn that figure walking absently from the game there was the still sadness of another world The Master seemed like a relic left behind by Meiji On the bridge of transition was the battle of the Master to restore the vitality of the very game that made him bleed, justified Is the birth of nostalgia, the loneliness of changeagonizing than physical death Mr Uragami poses a baffling question whether the metaphoric notion of sealed in cans would make our lives happier without our territories being invaded or are we equipped to forfeit our conquered territories to smell the fresh winds of change TerritoryGo is fierce it is a territorial game Territory called ji in Japanese is formed by a continuous line bounding the adversarial stones in a captured territoryHad Go, like the N drama and the tea ceremony, sunk deeper and deeper into the recesses of a strange Japanese tradition Go becomes the medium through which various boundaries are pitted against a strategic battle of sustainability and perishability Otake s robust and patiently timed moves paves a path to a modern strategic system that abides the essence of time and laws challenging the Master and capturing territories by abstract conditions of Justice Mr Uragami take this territorial battle further into the lives of the players and the existence of Go as a traditional art and as a embedded culture of a nation The Game of Go that has its origins in China about 4ooo years ago is now an inhabitant of the Japanese culture It has been explored and improvised by the Japanese societal s forthan 12oo years to be an important artistic heritage of the Japanese cultural territory The threat of this game being captured by foreign territories becomes conspicuous when Mr Uragami expresses his skepticism over whether a foreigner Dr.Dueball s Germany the game had attracted players from America would do justice to the game of Go as he will be unaware of the history of the game and would treat it is a sheer game and not art that had become a way of life to many Japanese Go players Does the mystery and the nobility of a game is diminished if played away from the land of its origin Is a sovereign heritage greater than the art of the game These similar worries was expressed by the Master when in a bid to reclaim his genius over the game, he witnessed Otake s severe game brimming with scientific precision and slyness The striking of the stones was echoing the violence of a tragic chasm of a competitive world that had bestowed the title of invincibility to the Master crafting a grand super powerful figure The Master became a citizen of a hallucinatory world where he achieved a winning immortality a world where he believed he could not afford to lose The mentioning of the fact that the Master had not played the Black stones forthan 30 years inferences can be drawn of a possibility of the White stones being the honored territory of a Master Is then this illusionary territory that brings tragic consequence when the sanguine vagueness is marred by the loneliness of reality When does the player become larger than the game When do the s of cultural heritage become greater than its sovereign nation When does the move Black 69 strike like the flash of a dagger piercing into the safeguarded territory of the player capturing his stone wall Contiguity of Stones The continuity of the stones is established by placing them in row in a horizontal and vertical manner Diagonally placed stones are vulnerable for a territorial captive attack.A lonely stone is unfavourable to the playing contestantDon t you suppose he was lonelyYes But he the Master was always lonely Did the loneliness, the thought of him being the probable last surviving Master of Go from the Meiji era made the Master vulnerable to Otake s stubborn ambition Like an isolated stone that becomes less powerful, did the seclusion of his artistic prowess in the modern world made him defenseless Mr Uragami contradicts the play of contiguity by illustrating a breakage brought by modernity in the world of Go and its players In the play of black upon white and white upon black, the threat of forfeiture prevailed right from the personal feelings of the players to the fate of the game in the altered Japanese landscape In the emerging new age and fresh vitality of Go would the frequent threat of forfeiture interrupt the contiguity of history and traditions leading to the collapse of the stone s sanguineness Life and death of the stoneA stone has a life and can be killed when entirely surrounded by the adversarial stone In the war like game the stones and the players amalgamate into one whole existence The notion of sealed in tin cans depicted during the play keeps the player from external disturbance The game and its strategies follow the players until the game is over and even thereafter, as in the case of the Master For a Go player each free moment is a risk management session increasing the pressures of time and the deliberation over the future moves brings certain quirks and nervous addictions The sanity of life is found in the madness of GoHe is not just a genius He is inhuman Unlike Mr Otake, the Master was bled by the game of Go The shadows of Go followed the Master hovering into the vagueness of his existence As a true artist sculpting the Go art, the Master resisted from judging the persona of the opponent as it perverted the sanctity of the game The Master calculated his every move even when he played a game of chess, billiards and mahjong When the Master played his moves and the game consumed his life, at times making him lose the realization of his own identity The stones had sealed his destiny as a Go Master in a can of loneliness and the shrewd game has made him a sort of a martyr Mr Uragami who himself was an ardent fan of the Master, infers that there are two types of players one who are complacent with their game output and the other who meticulously enhance their art the word satisfaction being a rarity in their game The Master belonged to the latter The Master had become a tragic figure, a ghostlike existence Novelist Naoki Sanjugo who wrote himself to death asserts,If one chooses to look upon Go as valueless , then absolutely valueless it is and if one chooses to look upon it as a thing of value , the a thing of absolute value it is So where does a player stop from not letting the game consume him Is the art of the game that creates martyrs of its soldiers The pleasure of the game brings seclusion from worldly exhilarations of life The unadulterated sleep of a child is far fetched blessing in the cursed insomniac world ridden by chaotic configurations When does the harmonic monochromatic ballet of Go become a war of spirit and destiny Is then life greater than a man or is the man greater than the life The long coarse white hair on the Master s eyebrow the symbol of life s longevity knew the answer and so did White 130.Under the morbid tides of destiny the death of a stone The game ends Hope ends A new stone is astutely placed on an intersection Once again, the game of Go begins , deciding a new destiny for its Master