@DOWNLOAD E-PUB Á The Making of the President 1972 È eBook or E-pub free

White s fourth and final installment of his Presidential election chronicles He seemed to have a much better grasp on most of the various and complicated elements of this election than he did on the 1968 election White is especially prescient and forward thinking on the at that time growing disaster that was Watergate the book was written in the spring of 1973 In fact, his analysis of the deed and the ramifications that would result from it is very much on the mark He anticipated t White s fourth and final installment of his Presidential election chronicles He seemed to have a much better grasp on most of the various and complicated elements of this election than he did on the 1968 election White is especially prescient and forward thinking on the at that time growing disaster that was Watergate the book was written in the spring of 1973 In fact, his analysis of the deed and the ramifications that would result from it is very much on the mark He anticipated that this could well bring Nixon down, as it did a little over a year later.White s strength in this and the other books is his behind the scenes access to all of the major players in the campaigns He speaks to everyone, and gains access to rooms where crucial decisions are made He develops somewhat of a grudging respect for President Nixon as he shows the strains and stresses that are placed on Nixon, while also giving him ample credit for his great foreign policy accomplishments He gives sympathy, but also a fair share of criticism, to Senator George McGovern for trying to be the good guy and talking about peace, yet remaining incredibly out of tune with the American people and what they wanted Also, McGovern s handling of the Eagleton, O Brien, and Salinger affairs leaves plenty of room for someone to question his ability to occupy the White House One flaw that I found in this book, as in the 1968 book, was the superficial treatment of the George Wallace campaign White mentions it from time to time, and only glosses over the assassination attempt that left Wallace paralyzed from the waist down White should have devoted a chapter to Wallace s movement and to the details of the assassination attempt White is often too comfortable in rambling narrative and therefore never really nails his colours to the mast in terms of how rather than when the election was won A reflective dimension is missing, but it provides an adequate and enjoyable overview of the 1972 election. @DOWNLOAD E-PUB ô The Making of the President 1972 ¹ End of the Postwar WorldSolitary ManRoad to Cedar PointFrom the Liberal Idea to the Liberal TheologyView from Key BiscayneBlue Collars and Bread and ButterDemocratic PrimariesA Party In Search of IdentityMcGovern s ArmyWeb of Numbers A Message from the Census to Politics Confrontation at MiamiEagleton AffairRichard Nixon s Campaign Out There Power Struggle President versus PressWatergate AffairShaping of the MandateMen and MachineryAppeal to the People Verdict in NovemberTemptation of PowerAppendix AAppendix BIndex White didn t win the Pulitzer for this one, but it s still an interesting read I wasn t paying attention to this race at the time, so it was fun to go back and learn about those years Will definitely put White s book on the 1960 election the Pulitzer winner on my reading list. I didn t used to follow politics much when younger, but who can forget Watergate and Nixon s and Agnew s resignations For me the best part of the book was the description of the campaign activities Never having been involved in a campaign, this was enlightening Also, while it was happening, I didn t understand why these people were rampaging and causing so much destruction during the Democratic convention Now I understand why It was comforting to have the author describe Nixon s strong area I didn t used to follow politics much when younger, but who can forget Watergate and Nixon s and Agnew s resignations For me the best part of the book was the description of the campaign activities Never having been involved in a campaign, this was enlightening Also, while it was happening, I didn t understand why these people were rampaging and causing so much destruction during the Democratic convention Now I understand why It was comforting to have the author describe Nixon s strong areas, since Watergate left out no details of his weaknesses Theodore White is incredibly insightful Story is by no means dated Analysis of 1972 election gives understanding to current political trends Well worth a read. This is probably the best of White s election chronicles His coverage of 1960 was heavily biased in favor of the Kennedy campaign, and I found both 64 and 68 to be less engaging In The Making of the President 72 , White s conclusions pretty much stand up to the test of time, and are generally valid today He makes it clear that McGovern simply was unable to convince the public that he could do a better job than Nixon White notes that McGovern s campaign staff ran a brilliant operation in This is probably the best of White s election chronicles His coverage of 1960 was heavily biased in favor of the Kennedy campaign, and I found both 64 and 68 to be less engaging In The Making of the President 72 , White s conclusions pretty much stand up to the test of time, and are generally valid today He makes it clear that McGovern simply was unable to convince the public that he could do a better job than Nixon White notes that McGovern s campaign staff ran a brilliant operation in winning the nomination, but forgot that there was a whole other Democratic party outside of the convention They were simply too inexperienced He alienated the very people who might have been able to have gotten his message across to the rank and file, such as Pierre Salinger Growing up in a rabidly New Deal Democratic household, at the time of the election I fully bought into the charges that the Republicans had engineered McGovern s triumph because they knew he would be easy to beat But as White demonstrates, McGovern won the nomination masterfully, with his hard charging and fast reacting staff The deft management of his floor captains during the convention was awe inspiring Of course, alienating huge blocks of his party didn t help in the long run, but that is another story White also correctly noted that McGovern held very strong principles, but in face to face encounters, he could be very deceitful For example, his treatment of O Brien and Salinger McGovern waffled on too many questions, which lost him a great deal of credibility Eagleton later remarked that if McGovern had simply called him immediately and said that he needed to step down for the good of the party, Eagleton would have done so gladly Just reading McGovern s outright denial of sending Salinger to Paris to meet with the North Vietnamese gave me shivers, and not good ones Lest I be perceived as a McGovern basher, I ll add that in 1972 I was 12 years old, and my family was one of only two in the small Florida town where we lived who supported McGovern The other was our Episcopalian minister Old ladies in the congregation continually begged him Reverend, PLEASE take that McGovern sticker off of your car It s EMBARRASSING 1972 was the last Presidential election where I feel that voters were given a clear and truly different choice But I believe that McGovern was simply moving too fast, and was a bit ahead of his time on most social issues White says that The full nature of the Nixon mind was probably known only to three peopleKissinger, Ehrlichman, and Haldeman His portrayal of Nixon as a solitary man goes far to explain the slow descent of the Nixon administration into the pit that became known as Watergate At the time, I furiously argued with my Republican classmates that Nixon KNEW and gave the orders, but as an adult I gradually came to realize that he truly did not This was, in many ways,terrible, because he strove to coverup something that he himself admitted was stupid This bunker mentality destroyed his presidency, and has resulted in the good points of his record, i.e women s rights, Native American rights, etc to be obscured Nixon out liberaled the liberals on many issues, a tactic that Clinton was to successfully repeat against his own opponents much later In summation, as White says, Nixon both deserved to win in 1972, and in 1974 he deserved to be driven from office White has been accused of going soft on Nixon, but bear in mind that his book was written while the Watergate investigation was still in progress His subsequent book Breach of Faith does not hold back any punches For me the 1972 campaign was the most visceral and gripping election of my entire life Both McGovern and Nixon were fascinating men, who I never tire of reading about With McGovern s recent death, I felt as if an era has ended White s The Making of the President 1972 is a crucial work for people interested in that election or the two protagonists Interesting fact McGovern voted for Ford in 1976 Writing the book when two Nixon aide s were on trial, and executive office was stained from Richard Nixon s abdication, White s account of Nixon s shattering success in 1972 is remarkable The book takes us from through the post war world The American ideas about the Great Society, the involvment in Vietnam, and the social issues of identity and civil rights With the exception of Roosevelt, no other president had a larger footprint in politics than Nixon in the last hundred years Privacy and Writing the book when two Nixon aide s were on trial, and executive office was stained from Richard Nixon s abdication, White s account of Nixon s shattering success in 1972 is remarkable The book takes us from through the post war world The American ideas about the Great Society, the involvment in Vietnam, and the social issues of identity and civil rights With the exception of Roosevelt, no other president had a larger footprint in politics than Nixon in the last hundred years Privacy and suspicision infected his thought, and the rising tide of liberal press and college campus protests would increae the guardedness As White articulates scar tissue had grown thick by the time of re election, rigid self discipline p.16.And the democratic primary of 1972 was as entertaining as the most recent Republician circus of 2016 The McGovern strategy, leapfrog Illinois and roll up the party from the left p.95 , successfully thwarted the attempts of former vice president Hubert Humphrey, the stiff old school morality of Governor Muskie, and the dog whistling inflammtory language of Governor Wallace McGovern s identification with the far left, embrace of draft dodgers, and unequivocable call to end the war in Vietnam left him continuially behind Nixon Even in attempts to add Kennedy to the ticket, and attack the establishmnet, his foothold as a leader to the country never occurred.There are multiple stores here that are really fascinating, the chapter on Tom Eddington as a vice president selection, selected by the campaign committee on a tiring all nighter, is insightful into mental health as a campaign story John Dickerson s Whistlestop episode on this is just fascinating in particular, and shows how McGovern s decision on his VP destroyed his credibility with voters Also, Nixon s attacks on the Washington Post and New York Times, and the beginning of a fractured worldview in the country forcasts the media landscape today And of course the Watergate affair, likened to a mystery novel with less clever intruders.White uses numbers to discuss his story effectively Commenting on how the daily death reports in Vietnam would effect the nation, or how the beginning ofsophisicated polling data was used in campaigns, all of which shows the beginning of adata heavy way to take in the world Compare to today s rigorous pollings of every issue, and Twitter spectacles, it s quaint, but as White points out, it s a sign of the country s beginning into a few decade.White points out that the 1972 is often compared to the campaign of 1964 Ideas of the Great Society, and big government initiatives vs state initiatives were central to voters Attacks on the establishment or by the establishment are as fresh as the latest 2016 campaign The electorate has just voted again, and there are shades of 1972 in the mirror Like that fractured tulberant time, the dice have been cast, and America has accepted a leader, and time will test our prudence I recently finished reading The Making of the President 1972 A narrative of American politics in action by Theodore H White.Below are key excerpts from this book that I found to be particularly insightful He recognized best, and spoke most clearly, for how Americans chose to live at home in their neighborhoods or, at the very least, he persuaded an astounding majority of Americans that he understood their emotions and needs better than his rival With his victory, he believed in all sincer I recently finished reading The Making of the President 1972 A narrative of American politics in action by Theodore H White.Below are key excerpts from this book that I found to be particularly insightful He recognized best, and spoke most clearly, for how Americans chose to live at home in their neighborhoods or, at the very least, he persuaded an astounding majority of Americans that he understood their emotions and needs better than his rival With his victory, he believed in all sincerity that he had been given a mandate to reorganize the American government to make itresponsive to what the voters had shown they wanted The after fact that this genuine mandate might be denied him by Watergate, by the frightening way he had let his own appointees use his purposes to flout law that is a story this book will inescapably, later, come to But the book begins with how the people saw their leaders, and how the leaders saw then people, in America in1972, when the and how he leaders saw then people, in America m 1972, when the postwar world was coming to an end and how the people chose Richard Nixon Roosevelt had come of the patricians and rarely soiled himself with the nitty gritty of mechanical politics Roosevelt campaigned in another time, almost m another country Large of vision, buoyant of spirit, steeped in history by family and blood, the lordly Roosevelt left it to his lieutenants to deal with the wards, the townships and regional power brokers, then pasted up his electoral votes, as he did the stamps his dealers brought him, in his album It was quite clear always to Roosevelt what he was dealing with and what he had to do and he did it easily The world of the 1960 s which the liberals had dominated m America was changing so rapidly that by the beginning of the 1970 s America was changing so rapidly that by the beginning of the 1970 s change had created a climate of schizophrenia in liberal thinking, almost a civil war among thinkers who came of the same tradition Always, since the time of Washington and Jefferson, three great permanent issues have dominated American politics foreign policy the clash of the races and the managing of the economy In the 1960 s, however, a liberal administration had accepted the war in Vietnam and its unfurling had then split liberals from top to bottom Liberals had championed the Black Revolution and been unable to cope with its results Liberals had masterminded the great boom of the 1960 s and not foreseen its effect on manners and morals Well, Mr Nixon liked Andrew Jackson Jackson took on the banks He liked Lincoln Lincoln took on slavery and the cause of the Union He liked Grover Cleveland Cleveland took on the Congress, and restored the power of the Presidency which had been lost by Andrew Johnson And Teddy Roosevelt he had taken on the trusts and vested interests And Wilson Wilson took on the Senate and the isolationists And Franklin Roosevelt The common denominator, said the President, was that they accepted controversy and they made things move, they wanted progress There s a role in life for men like McKinley, good men, said the President But he Nixon, didn t want to be like McKinley, nor like Eisenhower He wanted to be a leader Statistics had once been a clearly marked area of scholarship, where economists, sociologists and planners held intellectual squatter s rights Now the numbers were a new staple of journalism The Bloody Thursday figures fitted into the middle pages of the newspapers, as did the numbers on traffic, schools and tobacco use But the high impact figures unemployment, prices, crime were front page news everywhere, as well as natural stories for the television evening news Slowly, one tried to explore the numbers, for they had become the fashionable way for politicians to demonstrate a grip on reality And one learned that there are real numbers and phony numbers Each decade in American life has a Sacred Issue to which all politicians must pay lip service In the 1950 s, the Sacred Issue had been Defense and Anti Communism In the 1970 s, it seems certain that it will be the cause of Environment In the 1960 s, however, the Sacred Issue was Education and the Census of 1970, reporting on youth, Issue was Education and the Census of 1970, reporting on youth, measured the mania for education which had swept American society in the previous decade One could best explain the nature of this struggle in 1972 by making an imaginary diagram of the American power structure at the tum of the century and comparing it to the American power structure as the postwar world came to its end In 1900, as William McKinley prepared for his second term, the American power structure could be described in pure Leninese At the pinnacle of power was Wall Street finance Wall Street centralized American national action it decided where mines would be opened, railways built, what immigrant labor should be imported, what tech railways built, what immigrant labor should be imported, what technology developed it immigrant labor should be imported, what tech discussion At a second level was the Congress of the United States doing the will of the great financiers, enacting the necessary laws, repelling the raiders of prairie discontent On a third level was the series of largely undistinguished men who until 1900 had held the figurehead office of President of the United States for thirty years their chief power, beyond the expression of patriotic piety, was to deploy a minuscule professional army and navy against Indians and Spaniards The American clergy exercised some moral power, best expressed in such issues of national political importance as temperance Behind came all the other power ingredients a decorative Supreme Court, the early labor unions, the corrupt big city machines, the universities Then the proprietary press for the press was then a proprietorship, something owned by businessmen for making money By 1972 the power structure had entirely changed The most important fall from power had happened to finance businessmen might get fat, as they still did in 1972, by wheedling subsidies from national or state governments, but they were now a lobby that came hat in hand before a legislature and executive to whom once they had dictated Labor, big labor, had risen to almost equal political power The clergy had declined in power eventhan big business Congress, too, was a major loser in the power game seventy years of domination by vigorous, aggressive Presidents had reduced its self respect and, evencritically, the respect of the public The Supreme Court had reached a peak of control over the national agenda m the 1960 s but its power was beginning to fade again as the seventies began Universities were among the big gainers in the power hierarchy universities now were among the big gainers in the power hierarchy universities now But the two greatest gainers in the reorganized power structure were the Executive President and his adversary press, or, as one shouldproperly phrase it in modem America, the press television complex Both tried to operate under what they considered traditional rules, but American life had made that impossible The story of Watergate was only one of a number of major stories in the election of 1972 As it unraveled, it was to become a story of 1973 and would fit better, someday when all was known, into a story of the use and abuse of power in a modem state The elections of 1972 were determined, basically, by the record Richard Nixon had written in the understanding of his people and his chief adversary was not in the understanding of his people and his chief adversary was not understood and spoke for the people better than he did himself On this immediate level of contest, Richard Nixon won The people preferred Richard Nixon The Watergate affair is inexplicable m terms of older forms of corruption in American history, where men broke laws for private gain or privilege The dynamics of its irrationality are compounded further by stupidity The men involved were involved at a moment, in 1972, when history was moving their way They were trying to speed it by any means history was moving their way They were trying to speed it by any means, that, as history may record, compounds their personal felonies with national tragedy For it would be no less than national tragedy if men came to regard the election of 1972 as fraud or attempted to reverse the verdict of the people at the polls on the technicalities of a burglary, in a spasm of morality approaching the hysterical The Democratic Party, which called itself the party of the future, had become, in their eyes, the party of the past They turned instead to Richard Nixon, affirming the change of direction he declared he was giving to government a restraint on the power and reach of the Federal state into daily life However his use of the power of state may be defined in the months or years to come, use of the power ot state may be defined in me months or years to come, For this time, they preferred to live their own lives privately unplagued by moralities, or war, or riots, or violence In the alternation of the sequences of American history, in the cycle between poetry and pragmatism, in those generational shifts of mood characteristic of the adventure in democracy certainly the ideas of the minority who voted for McGovern would come into then time again Those ideas still stirred in the spirit of the nation But until those ideas had new form, new shape, new perspective, the majority of Americans would not be called out to march in their cause Such was their mandate in 1972.An educative read on American history and politics The politics of the presidential candidates, the incumbent and George McGovern are described in great detail I have had little information about presidential races other than what I see on the TV news Since watching the news is a relatively new activity for me, I am ill informed All I recall about this race is that Thomas Eagleton, his vice presidential pick, was dropped because he had a history of mental health issues I thought this most unfair at the time Now, considering the current pres The politics of the presidential candidates, the incumbent and George McGovern are described in great detail I have had little information about presidential races other than what I see on the TV news Since watching the news is a relatively new activity for me, I am ill informed All I recall about this race is that Thomas Eagleton, his vice presidential pick, was dropped because he had a history of mental health issues I thought this most unfair at the time Now, considering the current presidency, I understand their concern Anyhow, I digress This book relates the candidates races in great detail At times, this was difficult for me to digest as I know so little about politics I must say that I was given a good education Maybethan I ever wanted Who is to say what would have happened if the election had played out differently The peoples overwhelmingly voted for Richard Nixon, but did he win fair and square Evidently not He left office after Agnew had resigned as VP Nixon replaced him with Gerald Ford So when Nixon resigned, Ford became President without ever having been elected to either office of VP or the presidency