*Download ☋ The Glass Canoe ☔ Ebook or Kindle ePUB free

I have read 4 of David Irelands books in the last year and am an unabashed admirer I recall writing in my review of his The Unknown Industrial Prisoner that I related to a few of the characters in the book from working experiences in factories etc In the same way I can relate to many of the character s from the Glass Canoe I have worked with these blokes, I have had the occasional beer with a few of them The life that David Ireland wrote about is not as present in Australian cities such as S I have read 4 of David Irelands books in the last year and am an unabashed admirer I recall writing in my review of his The Unknown Industrial Prisoner that I related to a few of the characters in the book from working experiences in factories etc In the same way I can relate to many of the character s from the Glass Canoe I have worked with these blokes, I have had the occasional beer with a few of them The life that David Ireland wrote about is not as present in Australian cities such as Sydney any Certainly not in Brisbane where I live In the 1970 s though, pubs and their people, Tribes is the label Ireland uses, were common Plenty of blokes had a regular where they became a tribal fixture, part of the pubs furniture, a subculture This book is written about that subculture in a Sydney suburban pub called the Southern Cross It was written at a time that this subculture was being forced to change and also to move The book in fact highlights that change in some subtle ways that highlight the wonderful observations of the author As an example the narrator, Meat Man, uses a mixture of Imperial and Metric measurements when telling his tales All drinking is Imperial Schooner glasses are 15 ounces Pot glass consisted of 10 ounces of beer We even get blokes drinking 5 ounce beers This is the old lifestyle of the tribe Drinking for a past they know But when Meat Man goes to work on the golf course all is metric He even at times talks metric when driving his car For me personally this has been a look into a past world I only caught a glimpse of in my youth A male mono cultural world, a world that back then was collapsing even if I did not notice that change Over time this world has almost certainly disappeared in the capital cities of Australia s states Those that remember are now old and I suspect unhappy with the present multicultural Australia The pub they knew is trendy and serves craft beers They are even family friendly and are almost like restaurants Ireland s book could now, many years after writing, be considered a historical recognition of that subculture and that in my opinion is very important Yes it is alcoholic, misogynist and violent with some characters being racist But all this existed and I for one am glad that Ireland brings life to that world through this superb novel I m a famous writer in Australia.The glass canoe of the title is Meat Man s beer glass, which takes him and his drinking buddies on journeys to the questions we all sorry, I can t finish that sentence Anyway, this is about Australian idiot savants, some with larger than average penises, getting drunk Whilst they don t say anything very interesting, they manage to not be too annoying or pretentious They also do a fair bit of fighting, shagging, etc I quite liked it Some of it didn t wo I m a famous writer in Australia.The glass canoe of the title is Meat Man s beer glass, which takes him and his drinking buddies on journeys to the questions we all sorry, I can t finish that sentence Anyway, this is about Australian idiot savants, some with larger than average penises, getting drunk Whilst they don t say anything very interesting, they manage to not be too annoying or pretentious They also do a fair bit of fighting, shagging, etc I quite liked it Some of it didn t work the kids witnessing a car accident and behaving as if they were watching TV I guess that might have been edgy in the 70s But I quite liked Meat Man, going on about his little mysteries and his massive cock At the time of its release 1976 The Glass Canoe by David Ireland was a Miles Franklin Award winner and widely acclaimed Time though seems to have diminished the esteem in which Ireland s work is held, to the extent that his name sparks only mild recognition among readers today.Reading the book today, I can see why people prefer to avoid thinking about Ireland s vision of Australia This is a book infused with class, filled with ideas seemingly unfashionable to today s audience However, thi At the time of its release 1976 The Glass Canoe by David Ireland was a Miles Franklin Award winner and widely acclaimed Time though seems to have diminished the esteem in which Ireland s work is held, to the extent that his name sparks only mild recognition among readers today.Reading the book today, I can see why people prefer to avoid thinking about Ireland s vision of Australia This is a book infused with class, filled with ideas seemingly unfashionable to today s audience However, this is class without ideological rigidity, expressed inexpressionist tones rather than social realism.This is an incredibly vivid, brutal book Yet it constantly astounds the reader with scenes of real lyrical beauty He does so with a great deal of honesty about a side of Australia that rarely features in our popular notion of ourselves There is no political correctness in the depictions of men, booze, language and attitude What makes all this evenstartling is the stylistic expression brief vignettes that experiment with form and narrative structure The introduction to this most recent edition released only a couple of months ago after spending a few decades out of print sums it up nicely It s art, not entertainment action, not plot It s the lurking dark beast of fear and beauty at the core of Australian life It is all we know, and all we seek to put behind us, and all the literary world has struggled to evade and overcome.It is almost unthinkable that a modern publisher would dare to send The Glass Canoe, stuffed as it is with words of sexism, with prejudice and with brutal, escalating unending violence, out into the world of literary festivals and promotion tours.I agree with this, which is itself a sad indictment of modern publishing The Glass Canoe is the least judgmental of books It depicts horror and beauty It casts the world of rootin and fightin every Saturday night into poetry and records it for prosperity What I like most about it is the attempt to give literary voice to a certain tribe of Australians A tribe in a certain time and place that is oft denied or overlooked Alky Jack the homeless drunkard with a Socialist heart lectures the bar, Never be ashamed of being an Australian, he d say There s plenty just as bad as us in the world Anything can happen We started off in chains, we do our best when we re not pushed, we pay back a good turn, say no to authority and upstarts, we re casual, we like makeshift things, we re ingenious, practical, self reliant, good in emergencies, think we re as good as anyone in the world, and always sympathise with the underdog Ireland captures this view, allows the reader to savour it, and subverts it straight away There is love and irony in almost every word, and for those of us with some experience of the Australia captured in the book it s hard not to feel that there is something of Australia is in your hands Perhaps it s an old Australia, an Australia that we might well like to see the back of although if you know anything of the drinking culture in this country I wouldn t be certain of writing the obituary just yet.This book will not be to everyone s taste The casual sexism and racism will deter many, to their loss I couldn t recommend ithighly myself Just loved this book Devoured it like a schooner after mowing a summer lawn Now, my girlfriend tells me it s misogynistic I disagree Some of the characters are sexist dinosaurs by today s standards I mean, it s a book about a racist, sexist, homophobic world 1970s Australian pub culture It d be mendacious to paint it as anything but However the narrator s romantic beer goggles looking back lend the book a poetry that I only wishAussie bar flies harboured today But what would I kn Just loved this book Devoured it like a schooner after mowing a summer lawn Now, my girlfriend tells me it s misogynistic I disagree Some of the characters are sexist dinosaurs by today s standards I mean, it s a book about a racist, sexist, homophobic world 1970s Australian pub culture It d be mendacious to paint it as anything but However the narrator s romantic beer goggles looking back lend the book a poetry that I only wishAussie bar flies harboured today But what would I know Let me start by saying that I really liked this book, and I feel that I have discovered another great Australian writer whose work I have not read before.But I do wonder about the breadth of its appeal today Firstly, I can t imagine that many women would enjoy this novel, with its blue collar male environment set in the front bar of a rough pub where the only women welcome are barmaids and prostitutes.Secondly, I wonder if anyone but an Australian, or perhaps a British man, could relate to this Let me start by saying that I really liked this book, and I feel that I have discovered another great Australian writer whose work I have not read before.But I do wonder about the breadth of its appeal today Firstly, I can t imagine that many women would enjoy this novel, with its blue collar male environment set in the front bar of a rough pub where the only women welcome are barmaids and prostitutes.Secondly, I wonder if anyone but an Australian, or perhaps a British man, could relate to this tale of booze and skiting that is so quintessentially Australian in its character.And thirdly, I wonder whether anyone born after the 1960s would recognise, or find believable, the hotel environment that Ireland describes, which has now all but disappeared except maybe in a few backstreet pubs in working class suburbs.None of this is to diminish or any way denigrate the fabulous quality of Ireland s spare, visceral and sinewy prose and the brilliance with which he has captured the ambience, culture and glorious characters of the time and place of which he writes.The fact that I am an Australian male born before 1960 means that I have seen it, experienced it up to a point and can appreciate the literary achievement in this novel which was awarded the 1976 Miles Franklin prize.Ireland sets his novel in the Southern Cross Hotel in a working class suburb of Sydney The characters who inhabit this pub, seemingly for many hours a day on most days of the week, are true boozers, who love to travel in their imaginations to places unknown via their glass canoes beer glasses.Some hold down a job, some play sport and have some sort of meaningful life and human relationships outside of the front bar, and others are devoted alcoholics and degenerates who are almost never sober.The story is narrated by Meat Man real name Lance , whose nickname is a none too subtle reference to the alleged size of his manhood.Through a series of very short, sometimes only half a page, chapters, Meat Man introduces the reader to the multitude of characters he drinks with and describes some of the crazy escapades and shenanigans they get up to, both inside and outside the bar, some of which are legal and some which are not.There are too many characters to mention them all, but one who stands out is Alky Jack, the local alcoholic resident philosopher One really fine example of Ireland s brilliant and evocative descriptive prose, which he uses sparsely, comes with this introduction to Alky Jack Behind his eyes were stores of scenes and images A lot of the images were words His bottom eyelids had come loose and swung out, red and full of liquid His hair was ashes, hands crawling with frogskin, face dried out like plums bathed in caustic, left in the sun and wrinkling into prunes When he turned his head, the back of his neck wrinkled like a tortoise If I had one complaint about the many excesses described in this story, it would be about the female characters By today s standards, it is probably misogynistic, certainly disrespectful and demeaning But it can be argued that Ireland captured, fairly accurately, the attitudes of the time amongst this class of males.But the scenes involving sex were generally exaggerated to the point of being comically grotesque, and virtually all women were portrayed as being voracious, kinky and sexually insatiable.Even Meat Man himself, who had a steady female companion who he referred to only as my darling , and on whom he cheated sexually at every opportunity, described his darling as being so eager that it defied reality.But this is a novel worthy of a major literary award, despite my reservations about the breadth of its relevance in the 21st century.Ireland sums up beautifully the world these men are content to inhabit, despite any disdain fromgenteel elements of society, in the novel s penultimate paragraph I went to the bar to get us someglass canoes to take us where we wanted to go I thought of the tribes across Australia, each with its waterhole, its patch of bar, its standing space, its beloved territory It was a great life MagicSquareChallenge Finally finished this quirky book by a renowned Australian author.The book won the Miles Franklin Award 1976.Cheeky, barfly humor.but David Ireland had difficultysustaining my reading pleasure Ups and downsand some good laughs Review MagicSquareChallenge Finally finished this quirky book by a renowned Australian author.The book won the Miles Franklin Award 1976.Cheeky, barfly humor.but David Ireland had difficultysustaining my reading pleasure Ups and downsand some good laughs Review David Ireland, AM, born 1927 and author of ten novels, has the rare distinction of having won the Miles Franklin Award three times, for The Unknown Industrial Prisoner in 1971 The Glass Canoe, in 1976, and A Woman of the Future in 1979 There isn t very much about him on Wikipedia, which as Nicholas Rothwell suggests in the introduction to the recently reissued edition of The Glass Canoe might be because Ireland went out of literary fashion, because the literati has abandoned his brand of r David Ireland, AM, born 1927 and author of ten novels, has the rare distinction of having won the Miles Franklin Award three times, for The Unknown Industrial Prisoner in 1971 The Glass Canoe, in 1976, and A Woman of the Future in 1979 There isn t very much about him on Wikipedia, which as Nicholas Rothwell suggests in the introduction to the recently reissued edition of The Glass Canoe might be because Ireland went out of literary fashion, because the literati has abandoned his brand of realism.The Australia that Ireland wrote about still exists, says Rothwell,, but issafely cordoned off, far from where books are read, and the books that once portrayed that other Australia are no longer seen as central to our literary life.Ireland s world in The Glass Canoe is stuffed with words of sexism, with prejudice and with brutal, escalating, unending violence incompatible with the Establishment s other, gentler books, with attitudes that didto polish the moral virtues of the reading class But now the days when Ireland was admired, and celebrated, not just as the hard voice of the people but as the chronicler of that world s demise are gone He hasn t published anything new for ages.When I posted a Sensational Snippet from The Glass Canoe a couple of days ago, I discovered that there are David Ireland enthusiasts out there who share my fascination for this author s writing Now that I ve finished the book, however, I do think it s a problematic novel.Implicit in Rothwell s analysis, it seems To read the rest of my review please visit *Download ☟ The Glass Canoe ☠ The Southern Cross is a pub, an old, battered and experienced place, somewhere in the centre of Sydney Meat Man is a regular, a very regular regular, who views the world the world of the pub and its clientele through his beer glass, his glass canoe which transports them all to other worlds, worlds of fighting and loving and, above all, drinking The grand saga of the Southern Cross or the tragic futility of humanity at a watering hole Perhaps it s all to be taken on a bent elbow with another swallow A reflective book full of the vernacular of Australian men of a certain era The passing thoughts of a man with no imagination for his spare time other than drinking beer and getting into the occasional blue Yet, he has thoughts, passing thoughts and insights that make the time you spend with him out of the pub almostinteresting than the parts where s he describing his tribe swimming in a sea of beer.Plot wise, there isn t much I m OK with that mainly because I enjoyed the writing and th A reflective book full of the vernacular of Australian men of a certain era The passing thoughts of a man with no imagination for his spare time other than drinking beer and getting into the occasional blue Yet, he has thoughts, passing thoughts and insights that make the time you spend with him out of the pub almostinteresting than the parts where s he describing his tribe swimming in a sea of beer.Plot wise, there isn t much I m OK with that mainly because I enjoyed the writing and the random observations and dialogue so much When the plot starts to coalesce about a third of the way through the book, it briefly intrigues but unfortunately splutters out at the end in some contrived scenes that don t seem to fit with the whole book Even so, this is now a favourite piece of Australian literature for me It is and honest and unflinching gaze upon pub culture that doesn t shy away from the misogyny of these blokes and avoids romanticising a way of life that avoids living in the real world David Ireland s The Glass Canoe won Australia s most prestigious literary award, The Miles Franklin Literary Award, in 1976 But the book and Ireland himself fell into a kind of obscurity It has only recently been brought back into print thanks to Text Publishing s Text Classics imprint, where, I am sure, it has found an entirely new audience But let s be frank this is a confronting book, probably one of the most confronting I ve ever read, because it presents an entirely male world, one David Ireland s The Glass Canoe won Australia s most prestigious literary award, The Miles Franklin Literary Award, in 1976 But the book and Ireland himself fell into a kind of obscurity It has only recently been brought back into print thanks to Text Publishing s Text Classics imprint, where, I am sure, it has found an entirely new audience But let s be frank this is a confronting book, probably one of the most confronting I ve ever read, because it presents an entirely male world, one which revolves around alcohol, violence, sex and sexism This is not a book for the faint hearted, nor is it for those who are easily offended, especially by outdated and misogynistic attitudes to women.To read the rest of my review, please visit my blog