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We love this book and would rate it one of the best childrens books of all time Written in beautiful and poetic language it evokes a magic rarely found I feel the first seven chapters are excellent, after this there are some bits that feel a slog and there are some discussions between Abner and his staff that go on to the extent that now we have read it so many times I leave some bits out Obviously a publisher these days would also point out that the ending should be changed This aside ther We love this book and would rate it one of the best childrens books of all time Written in beautiful and poetic language it evokes a magic rarely found I feel the first seven chapters are excellent, after this there are some bits that feel a slog and there are some discussions between Abner and his staff that go on to the extent that now we have read it so many times I leave some bits out Obviously a publisher these days would also point out that the ending should be changed This aside there are some chapters that really stand out The scene were Cole escapes through a painting and the description of the amazing christmas party are wonderful and could be read independently from the story We love the 1930s language and how Kay comes back from school for the holidays having picked up some awful slang such as asking his guardian to lend him some tin as he doesn t have a tosser to his kick Interesting that given it was written in the 30s the author describes a plane that could take of vertically and we wonder what parallels the author might draw if he were alive today, between the box of delights and a modern machine such as a tablet or 3DS We have a 1968 edition not pictured on goodreads, that has a beautiful cover in a very 60s style in dusky pink, yellow and olive green,unfortunately this last read was too much for the book and the cover fell off, but we have framed it in honour of this book Lovely to escape to amagical time, the perfect Christmas read (((Download Kindle))) ☔ The box of delights: when the wolves were running. ☉ Two of the greatest children s books ever written The Times on Box of Delights and The Midnight Folk And now, Master Harker, now that the Wolves are Running, perhaps you could do something to stop their Bite A magical old man has asked Kay to protect the Box of Delights, a Box with which he can travel through time But Kay is in danger Abner Brown will stop at nothing to get his hands on it The police don t believe Kay, so when his family and the Bishop are scrobbled up just before Christmas, he knows he must act aloneJohn Masefield s classic children s book is considered to be one of the great works of modern children s fiction Magical, fantastical and filled with vivid, rich characters brought to life in this edition by Quentin Blake s stunning artwork The Box of Delights and The Midnight Folk are a must read for any child John Masefield, poet laureate of the U.K from 1930 till his death in 1967, is perhaps best known for his poem Sea Fever I must go down to the seas again, to the lonely sea and the sky He was also, however, one of the finest and most influential writers of children s books I first read The Box of Delights in Kenya, when I was about ten When I went to the States for college, I was horrified to find that no one had heard of it, and that the only available edition had been butchered by an John Masefield, poet laureate of the U.K from 1930 till his death in 1967, is perhaps best known for his poem Sea Fever I must go down to the seas again, to the lonely sea and the sky He was also, however, one of the finest and most influential writers of children s books I first read The Box of Delights in Kenya, when I was about ten When I went to the States for college, I was horrified to find that no one had heard of it, and that the only available edition had been butchered by an abridger who had somehow managed to trim out all the most marvelous and magical parts Happily, New York Review Books recently came out with unabridged versions of both The Box of Delights and its precursor, The Midnight Folk It now seems to be finding some sort of readership in the U.S.The Box of Delights was first published in 1935, and achieved immediate success in Britain, where it is viewed with the same reverence as A Christmas Carol It follows the adventures of Kay, who meets Cole Hawlings, a traveling Punch and Judy man, at a train station Hawlings has a magical box, which is coveted by a gang of criminals disguised as clergy Knowing he ll soon be scrobbled by the gang, Hawling gives the box to Kay, who gets into adventures.Among the supporting cast of characters, Maria, Kay s gun toting cousin, stands out I shall shoot and I shall shock, as long as my name s Maria , as does Sylvia Daisy Pouncer, Kay s former governess The novel is delightfully illustrated by Masefield.Three years after The Box of Delights came out, T.H White published The Sword in the Stone, which was to become the foundation of The Once and Future King Certain sections of White s book owe much to Masefield s, including the parts where the Wart turns into various animals In 1948, C.S Lewis published the first of the Narnia books Lewis revered The Box of Delights The beauties, all the delights that keep on emerging from the box are so exquisite, and quite unlike anything I have seen elsewhere and The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, in particular, has a similar feel snow, wolves, magic, Christmas Two of the children are even named Peter and Susan Several sections of The Magician s Nephew are also indebted to The Box of Delights But the book that pays the most overt homage is probably Susan Cooper s The Dark Is Rising The Christmas theme, a boy meeting strange people with bright eyes who wear unusual rings, and the scenes with Herne the Hunter are all heavily inspired by the earlier novel.If the novels by White, Lewis, and Cooper had come out today, there would probably be a media furor and lawsuits once people realized the similarities with The Box of Delights So the book is also a lovely reminder of ainnocent time, when writers were free to be inspired, and free to purloin scenes and characters and turn them to their own uses, in trying to recreate a bit of magic A wonderful book What a vivid imagination The text is a little bit dated in places, but still a very enjoyable read The BBC adaptation of the book is very faithful to what the author set down, and well worth watching, if you ever get the opportunity It features a very young looking James Grout Superintendent Strange from the Inspector Morse television series. Must do a reread of this before christmas. The Wolves are Running That phrase was the best part of this book for me It stated immediate evil and drew me in, plus it kept me going when nothing else made sense This John Masefield tale is a Christmas favourite for many and seems to have influenced the Narnia saga I would also dare to say that it has some elements that may have influenced the Harry Potter stories as well such as the young hero, railway stations, snow filled villages, hot drinks, and magic.Alas, when it was first read to m The Wolves are Running That phrase was the best part of this book for me It stated immediate evil and drew me in, plus it kept me going when nothing else made sense This John Masefield tale is a Christmas favourite for many and seems to have influenced the Narnia saga I would also dare to say that it has some elements that may have influenced the Harry Potter stories as well such as the young hero, railway stations, snow filled villages, hot drinks, and magic.Alas, when it was first read to me as a child in an Aussie school, I just didn t get it But then, I didn t like listening to the C.S Lewis stories either, so maybe I was one of those Wolves To give Mr Masefield the full benefit of the doubt, I purchased the nicely bound New York Review edition, hoping forillumination But, while I gained a little bitappreciation, I remain under whelmed by it all.Young Kay still drove me crazy and I never knew when he was speaking to others or muttering to himself This edition thankfully explains some of those issues by explaining that Masefield s original manuscript had never been corrected until now, which explains my original childhood bias Long story short, the first publication of this book left several passages out, which the NYR edition fixes Time and Tide and Buttered Eggs wait for no man.Summation of my personal view STARFALL Loss of one star for driving me crazy how did Peter suddenly appear at the end , lack of structure, and the sudden ending.STAR RISE Addition of one star for imagination just as a child would think , pagan memories, and untouched slang of the 1930s.Evens itself out.Book Season Winter happy is that happy makes The Box of Delights 1935 by John Masefield is a miracle and a masterpiece of magical literature I admit to getting lost in the narrative I was completely absorbed in Kay Harker s adventures The actual box of delights allows the holder to travel quick or small or both the depiction of magical and enchanted journeys held me enthralled We encounter Herne the Hunter, the Lady of the Oak Tree, lions, unicorns and talking animals There are kidnappings, chases, robberies and great escapes I s The Box of Delights 1935 by John Masefield is a miracle and a masterpiece of magical literature I admit to getting lost in the narrative I was completely absorbed in Kay Harker s adventures The actual box of delights allows the holder to travel quick or small or both the depiction of magical and enchanted journeys held me enthralled We encounter Herne the Hunter, the Lady of the Oak Tree, lions, unicorns and talking animals There are kidnappings, chases, robberies and great escapes I set the book aside reluctantly and came back to it with great anticipation The evil Abner Brown and his henchmen were indeed creepy and sinister really quite scary The final chapter had me in tears I just wanted to be there literally experiencing the joy and wonder Now I must read The Midnight Folk by the same author It seems that many other reviewers had not read The Midnight Folk first, yet jumped into this, its sequel They seemed confused, and seem to think that it is because they are reading a sequel I can tell you it is not because you are reading a sequel Midnight Folk has virtually no back story on this, except a recycled villain , but simply because the book is quite confusing There is SO much in this book that I m surprised editors didn t catch and go, hang on a minute , etc Sometimes so It seems that many other reviewers had not read The Midnight Folk first, yet jumped into this, its sequel They seemed confused, and seem to think that it is because they are reading a sequel I can tell you it is not because you are reading a sequel Midnight Folk has virtually no back story on this, except a recycled villain , but simply because the book is quite confusing There is SO much in this book that I m surprised editors didn t catch and go, hang on a minute , etc Sometimes something is mentioned, such as a window being open, and in the next sentence we ll be told again that, yes, the window is indeed open Also, it will talk about a character standing up, and I ll search the last few pages trying to find when it was they actually sat down and they ll be no mention Annoying things like that Things they could have easily fixed with some proper editing view spoiler The fact that Peter got scrobbled one of my favourite bits of this book actually was the delightful use of the word scrobbled , and the last that is heard of him is when Abner is talking to him through his cell How can people have missed this How can the writer have missed this Seriously All I could think about for the last twenty pages was that poor Peter drowned and nothing was said Kay didn t even remember Oh And the whole it was all a dream really No Really If it weren t for the leaving Peter to drown thing and the horrible dream cliche , I might have given this four stars The dream cliche makes me feel like I ve wasted my time somehow, ESPECIALLY because The Midnight Folk was JUST as magical and hard to believe if you don t use imagination , yet it was all proclaimed true There was NO reason whatsoever to write this off as a dream None I m disappointed hide spoiler I do like that Abner Brown was brought up again, however He s a good villain, not like the watered down versions, he s the real thing He s not afraid, and in fact enjoys, dispersing with human life including children , yet is disillusioned and thinks that some of what he does may come to the good use of humanity The scene in the vault where he monologues is probably one of my favourites in the book I thought it well thought out on the authour s part Also, his use of black magic gave me chills just as much, if not , as C.S.Lewis Narnia writings of it did It s a charming book, but one I probably won t be reading again.The characters only spoke when it was necessary for them to move the disjointed plot along although, one could argue that this was because of the ending , yet it seems Masefield had fun with word play, making the Police Captain and Maria go on longer than needed just for fun.It got my imagination going, and that s why I loved Midnight Folk , but it was a bit disappointing thus the three stars It starts well with some very atmospheric scenes the men on the train and Cole Hawkins magic show are particularly good, as are the trips to the fort but as it goes on it has become very repetitive and convoluted How many times do we have to have Kay go small to spy on Abner talking to himself in exposition to reveal endless details of the non existent plot Stylistically it s dated with Enid Blyton y dialogue The magic seems barely thought out and apart from a few good moments at the s It starts well with some very atmospheric scenes the men on the train and Cole Hawkins magic show are particularly good, as are the trips to the fort but as it goes on it has become very repetitive and convoluted How many times do we have to have Kay go small to spy on Abner talking to himself in exposition to reveal endless details of the non existent plot Stylistically it s dated with Enid Blyton y dialogue The magic seems barely thought out and apart from a few good moments at the start is pretty mundane The writing of the action ending is really bad and you barely get any sense of real geography or concrete quality to it The deus ex machina has nothing to do with the main story or plot and the boy hero is basically a witness to events that do not require any action on his part Also, The way the police and grown ups behave in response to the children going missing is totally unbelievable and though you might get away with it once afterall grownups in kids books are always a little clueless The fact everyone reacts this way as multiple characters are kidnapped in suspicious circumstances starts to stretch my credulity to the limit I see that Frank Cotrell Boyce is currently writing a film adaptation, I have fond memories of the TV version and I imagine either would be preferable to this very dated book 3.5 the shifts in tone are somewhat jarring the book starts off as a light fantasy precursor to the likes of The Dark is Rising series, The Wolves of Willoughby Close, and John Gordon s Giant Under the Snow and sporadically digresses into a Wind in the Willows Alice in Wonderland type mode , and contemporary readers might find the antiquated I Say Jolly Good gung ho tone crossing over from whimsy into insufferable tweeness at times, but despite all that Masefield possesses a seemingly effort 3.5 the shifts in tone are somewhat jarring the book starts off as a light fantasy precursor to the likes of The Dark is Rising series, The Wolves of Willoughby Close, and John Gordon s Giant Under the Snow and sporadically digresses into a Wind in the Willows Alice in Wonderland type mode , and contemporary readers might find the antiquated I Say Jolly Good gung ho tone crossing over from whimsy into insufferable tweeness at times, but despite all that Masefield possesses a seemingly effortlessly ability in conjuring up a genuine sense of the numinous and otherworldly, and it is for that reason he is worth seeking out