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The Beginning and the End of Rape is an excellent overview of sexual violence perpetuated against American Indigenous women Deer uses colonization as a lens to understand why this violence occurs, and what it represents to women and their communities It is a challenging book that isn t afraid to engage with heavy issues and complex problems In particular, I appreciated her take on restorative justice and lateral violence in Indigenous communities, particularly people s tendency to romanticize The Beginning and the End of Rape is an excellent overview of sexual violence perpetuated against American Indigenous women Deer uses colonization as a lens to understand why this violence occurs, and what it represents to women and their communities It is a challenging book that isn t afraid to engage with heavy issues and complex problems In particular, I appreciated her take on restorative justice and lateral violence in Indigenous communities, particularly people s tendency to romanticize pre colonial cultures She is seeking answers to how to undermine and halt violence against women, and she leaves nothing unexplored as she sorts through the causes and potential reforms available in this area Overall, it s a fantastic resource, academic, yet still accessible I wouldn t have minded a fewfootnotes though for my own research The Beginning and End of Rape was one of the most challenging books I ve read in a while From the beginning, author Sarah Deer doesn t pull any punches when discussing sexual assault in Native communities, and it s this firm, educated, backed up point of view that makes the book an extremely powerful book, one that anyone in fields relating to criminal justice should read This is a book that touches on so many topics that I would guess the majority of Americans have no idea about even I, who h The Beginning and End of Rape was one of the most challenging books I ve read in a while From the beginning, author Sarah Deer doesn t pull any punches when discussing sexual assault in Native communities, and it s this firm, educated, backed up point of view that makes the book an extremely powerful book, one that anyone in fields relating to criminal justice should read This is a book that touches on so many topics that I would guess the majority of Americans have no idea about even I, who has read a decent amount about tribal law was blown away by Deer s meticulous understanding and insightful approaches to eradicating sexual assault, or at least change how sexual assault is viewed and prosecuted on a federal scale.But given the complexity and the sensitivity of such a subject, Deer s writing was a bit too academic and disconnected for me to really feel moved by such a book on sexual violence against Native women, a topic I feel very strongly about Granted, I am not the target audience to begin with, and I certainly have to give Deer major credit for bringing up some controversial ideas about how to reform the crimainl justice system so it better helps rape victims I think the legal aspects that Deer discussed could be a bit heavy at times, understandably, but that s what made the book difficult to get through A very important topic, for sure, but I found the delivery of it unfortunately lacking for an accessible read The Beginning and End of Rape Confronting Sexual Violence in Native America was such an emotional read for me I live in a state with a Native population, and have spent some time in Native communities But that not withstanding, I found the treatment of Native people described in this book appalling Rape of women and molestation of children is shameful under any circumstances, but especially so when we make it that muchdifficult for Native people in so many respects I encourage everyon The Beginning and End of Rape Confronting Sexual Violence in Native America was such an emotional read for me I live in a state with a Native population, and have spent some time in Native communities But that not withstanding, I found the treatment of Native people described in this book appalling Rape of women and molestation of children is shameful under any circumstances, but especially so when we make it that muchdifficult for Native people in so many respects I encourage everyone to read this eye opening book I am grateful to the author for focusingattention on this problem, and also for offering constructive and workable suggestions for real solutions as well.This book is extremely informative, well thought out and educational Though it was difficult to read in terms of the subject matter, I am so glad I did so In my opinion, this work is another huge step forward in advocacy for change.I received and Advance Reader Copy ARC of this digital book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review The first couple chapters are a little dense and academic, but the rest flows much quicker The set up is essential for the discussion and analysis in the bulk of the book I thought it was both engaging and enraging, an excellent combination to get us fired up and ready for activism It is a difficult read, but well worth it. I m perhaps not as well read in this area as I might be further complicated by how much of the scholarship is done by a person whose credentials have been called into question, but I m not sure this book was doing much that was wildly new It was presented to our class, I assume, as an alternative to that other work that has been done, and I think it sort of does that but less theoretically rigorously unfortunately, though her interventions in the specifically legal world are super interesti I m perhaps not as well read in this area as I might be further complicated by how much of the scholarship is done by a person whose credentials have been called into question, but I m not sure this book was doing much that was wildly new It was presented to our class, I assume, as an alternative to that other work that has been done, and I think it sort of does that but less theoretically rigorously unfortunately, though her interventions in the specifically legal world are super interesting The strongest chapter to me was her critique of restorative justice The suggestions section felt weak but I think that has to do with how broad the book had to be there was very little specificity, which makes sense but also felt like it didn t require an entire chapter to explain that each tribe has to come up with what works best for them Overall, a decent primer on the legal situation regarding rape and Native women in the US, so good for folks who are looking to start somewhere Wow At the intersection of rape culture and colonialization is The Beginning and End of Rape My intent in this book is to explore the interconnectedness of surviving colonization and surviving rape Life is really all about education If you re not growing your mind, you re dying And it s this kind of book that needsexposure of only to understand what really goes on in the world so we can make a difference This book really brings up the issue of tribal law and how we ve treated it, how Wow At the intersection of rape culture and colonialization is The Beginning and End of Rape My intent in this book is to explore the interconnectedness of surviving colonization and surviving rape Life is really all about education If you re not growing your mind, you re dying And it s this kind of book that needsexposure of only to understand what really goes on in the world so we can make a difference This book really brings up the issue of tribal law and how we ve treated it, how non native Americans should be subject to it, and the impact we ve had in its changing over the years It covers tribal rape law, what the data shows, the culpability of the federal government, where we need to go in the future Indeed, the crisis of rape in tribal communities is inextricably linked to the way in which the United States developed and sustained a legal system that has usurped the sovereign authority of tribal nations This colonial legal system has failed Native women by supplanting women centered societies with patriarchal, oppressive structures that condone and thrive on violence as a way to control and oppress members of marginalized communities These oppressive structures are predicated on hundreds of policies, regulations, and philosophies that underpin American justice The thing is, this book says as much about colonialization and Native American rights as it does about rape the two are tied together It is irrefutable that, based on the available data, violent crime is experienced by Native women at per capita higher rates than almost all other groups in the United States I am not aware of a single study federal, state, or tribal containing a statistically significant group of AI AN American Indian Alaska Native in which the data do not suggest that Native people suffer the highest rates of victimization in the United States I ve noticed that some skeptical politicians will try to claim the statistics are being manipulated to further tribal sovereignty interests, but these same politicians usually don t provide alternative data Perhaps they are too uncomfortable with the fact that white men are still raping Native women with impunity The sad thing is that these savages were much less barbaric in their thinking than the white colonizers Patriarchy is largely a European import Native women had spiritual, political, and economic power that European women did not enjoy That power was based on a simple principle women and children are not the property of men Europeans were often fascinated by the anti rape cultures they encountered, particularly when they discovered that Native men did not rape women war prisoners Even Europeans who wrote disparagingly about Native people noted that Native people abhorred sexual violence Brigadier General James Clinton of the Continental Army told his troops in 1779, Bad as the savages are, they never violate the chastity of any women, their prisonersAnd their law at the time even surpasses ours today when looking at the crime of rape When compared to the European and early American laws on rape, which often punished women for the actions of rapists, the tribal response to sexual assault was comparatively victim centric and respectful of survivors Not only is the idea of colonialization bad enough, but raping of the females of the indigenous peoples was something that naturally came along with it At the same time, the colonial mind set could not conceive of a legal wrong in raping a Native woman As a result, Native women were devalued and debased, and their abuse was seen as being outside the law Historian Albert L Hurtado notes of the nineteenth century California gold rush, Part of the invading population was imbued with a conquest mentality, fear and hatred of Indians that in their minds justified the rape of Indian womenNative women who are raped in the United States today face a legacy of laws that historically have protected perpetrators, allowing them to commit rape with impunity Rape isthan a metaphor for colonization, however it is integral to colonization I didn t realize that the US government had issued official apologies to the Indigenous people of this land Unfortunately, they resymbolic than anything, expressing regret but not taking any responsibility I guess that s the way we do things One apology was given at the end of the Clinton administration and posted on the BIA website It was taken down when Bush took office Relations between Native Americans and the federal government have never been good but it s even worse when it s the actual Federal Officials committing rape Before forced relocation, Native American women had no rights, could be raped by white settlers, and would have no recourse After moving to reservations or even being forcibly marched to them , where they relied on the military and traders to live, they often succumbed to rape by these same soldiers and traders Changes in laws have been made in the last few years, but these changes barely scratch the surface of what needs to be done The bottom line is that we have done a really shitty job in protecting women and responding to survivors of rape, especially with regard to indigenous women Reform still needs to happen It is clear that federal laws and policies are insufficient to address the fundamental needs of Native women living in tribal communities, who have not been able to trust the federal or state systems to respond to their experience That is why deliberate restoration of tribal authority is crucial for long term change Decision making authority and control over violent crime should be restored to indigenous nations to provide full accountability and justice to the victims Even as systemic federal agency reform is taking place, there will always be the foundation of wide gaps created by a system originally designed to destroy, not heal Tribal jurisdiction both civil and criminal must be completely restored without restriction Nothing less will do Thanks to NetGalley and University of Minnesota Press for a copy in return for an honest review. Really powerful book about a tragically under discussed topic Deer s writing is compassionate, unrelenting, and accessible The US legal history and Dana Deegan s story were particularly strong parts At times I found the analysis a bit cursory True, it s a difficult balance Deer understandably seems to want to avoid the book being trauma porn but I really wanteddetail on different tribal perspectives, whether about language, culture, past present laws and advocacy methods, etc Deer Really powerful book about a tragically under discussed topic Deer s writing is compassionate, unrelenting, and accessible The US legal history and Dana Deegan s story were particularly strong parts At times I found the analysis a bit cursory True, it s a difficult balance Deer understandably seems to want to avoid the book being trauma porn but I really wanteddetail on different tribal perspectives, whether about language, culture, past present laws and advocacy methods, etc Deer convincingly argues the deep and lasting damage of colonialism, yet in my opinion she under emphasizes Native ways of knowing Still, glad I read this book &Read Book ⇰ The Beginning and End of Rape: Confronting Sexual Violence in Native America ☊ Winner of the Labriola Center American Indian National Book Award Despite what major media sources say, violence against Native women is not an epidemic An epidemic is biological and blameless Violence against Native women is historical and political, bounded by oppression and colonial violence This book, like all of Sarah Deer s work, is aimed at engaging the problem head on and ending it The Beginning and End of Rape collects and expands the powerful writings in which Deer, who played a crucial role in the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act in , has advocated for cultural and legal reforms to protect Native women from endemic sexual violence and abuse Deer provides a clear historical overview of rape and sex trafficking in North America, paying particular attention to the gendered legacy of colonialism in tribal nations a truth largely overlooked or minimized by Native and non Native observers She faces this legacy directly, articulating strategies for Native communities and tribal nations seeking redress In a damning critique of federal law that has accommodated rape by destroying tribal legal systems, she describes how tribal self determination efforts of the twenty first century can be leveraged to eradicate violence against women Her work bridges the gap between Indian law and feminist thinking by explaining how intersectional approaches are vital to addressing the rape of Native womenGrounded in historical, cultural, and legal realities, both Native and non Native, these essays point to the possibility of actual and positive change in a world where Native women are systematically undervalued, left unprotected, and hurt Deer draws on her extensive experiences in advocacy and activism to present specific, practical recommendations and plans of action for making the world safer for all An invaluable resource for understanding the origin and continuation of the impact of colonization on sexual violence toward Native women. Very academic A slow read, but absolutely necessary.