{FREE} æ Stone Butch Blues ¼ eBook or E-pub free

I had put off reading Stone Butch Blues for well over a decade At first it was because I didn t think it was relevant to me, a young trans woman Everyone framed it as a lesbian novel or meant for trans men I couldn t see how I would relate to it, then But people kept recommending it, or assuming I d read it Later, I resisted reading it because I didn t want to like the thing everyone else liked and assumed I would like.Across those many years, a new canon had emerged trans women s litera I had put off reading Stone Butch Blues for well over a decade At first it was because I didn t think it was relevant to me, a young trans woman Everyone framed it as a lesbian novel or meant for trans men I couldn t see how I would relate to it, then But people kept recommending it, or assuming I d read it Later, I resisted reading it because I didn t want to like the thing everyone else liked and assumed I would like.Across those many years, a new canon had emerged trans women s literature A movement I was not only a fan of, but a small part of myself This canon centred around its own iconic book, Nevada by Imogen Binnie While I enjoyed Nevada, it couldn t reach me It wasn t made for the type of trans woman I know Nor were most of the other trans women s lit books coming out They had a primary intended audience of lesbian queer mostly white trans women my own experiences as a trans woman primarily attracted to men didn t find a home there Having dated mostly trans men and butches, I began to wonder about a trans men s literature what would that look like Would I find myself there, or my lovers I made several attempts to find the trans men s literature I was dreaming up finding few fiction titles and among them most didn t grab me Finally, I remembered Stone Butch Blues Receiving a copy as a present from a masc, I quickly devoured the book in one sitting While I don t think literature s primary goal should be representing people just like me it was a powerful moment for me all the time The mascs I dated, in all their complications and heart aches, were here on the page These butches stories, even separated by decades, were so close to the places I call home now And here, too, were the stone pros, drag queens, and trans women I could see myself in And I could see those women I admire but, out of a sense of competition for masc attention, keep at arm s length.Feinberg wrote about the people I knew, in the slice of community I exist in It s perhaps not for everyone no book should be burdened with the idea that it is for everyone but it moved me It did everything I want trans lit to do it showed us, the real us, without explaining or apologizing for the benefit of cis people it gave no false empowerment narrative or happy ending and it communicated big ideas about what it means to be One of Us in the world, to us.Praise aside, the novel s major problem is its repeated exoticization of Indigenous people and Two Spirit identity I can t say how this would ve read in 1993, but in 2017 it s blatant and awkward the kind of positive racism white people do while stumbling over themselves to be allies Feinberg s personal history of political commitment to the struggles of racialized peoples are laudable, but I d be remiss to sweep aside this issue.In all, the novel broke my heart, stitched it up, and then broke it again I loved it I so wish Feinberg were still alive so that I could tell hir that in person, but I know so many got the chance to This book, in spite of its flaws, is the essence of what trans lit should be Thank you, Twitter, for this one Have you ever opened a book and just knew it was something meant for you to read This is one.I d only heard of this book in passing, being that I was vaguely familiar with Leslie Feinberg So, on the day of the NYC Pride parade, I saw an article about how this is one of the greatest books of our time Then, picture my excitement when I find out its pdf is free on Feinberg s site If we re being candid, I m sorry it took me so long to read hir Feinberg preferre Thank you, Twitter, for this one Have you ever opened a book and just knew it was something meant for you to read This is one.I d only heard of this book in passing, being that I was vaguely familiar with Leslie Feinberg So, on the day of the NYC Pride parade, I saw an article about how this is one of the greatest books of our time Then, picture my excitement when I find out its pdf is free on Feinberg s site If we re being candid, I m sorry it took me so long to read hir Feinberg preferred genderless pronouns stuff because I wish I could shoot off an email to hir personally Leslie Feinberg died in 2014.The writing style affects me I wouldn t go as far as calling it simple, but Jess, the main character, has a very straight to the point way of expressing herself I warn in advance that this book has quite a few triggering situations, like view spoiler rape hide spoiler It caught me off guard, but it wasn t egregiously used Plus, it all made sense It wasn t like some entertainment some that I enjoy that really milks its scenes like that for shock value alone I hurt for Jess character I hurt for a lot of the characters I hurt so much for this book and yet, it was so beautifully crafted I hightlighted SO MUCH that I kept on at it Seeing a glimmer of light at the end of this long, depressing tunnel.I m not selling it well, am I I ll say that early on, as the character realizes she s not like the other girls, I was swept with a sense of an epic self journey This could easily be a prestige series on HBO or Netflix or Hulu Anything that can put a lot of money and research into it, really The character faces a heinous and believable amount of abuse from the cops, supposed loved ones, and general public cis men, especially As well as financial ups and downs and the little things that bind us as human There s romance, too I don t want to spoil much, but there s a character we re hinted to early So, I couldn t wait for her to pop up and when she does, she s a dream Political, outspoken, caring, intelligent, fierce in her high heels she had it all I had a major crush on this certain character I ll leave the will they last question for anyone who actually reads it Actuallythere are two character crushes in this A femme cis woman and a small town femme trans woman Simply, two amazing women.I can see someone getting weary after the numerous tragedies Sometimes, it seems like whatever bad could happen, happened.This book tackles lesbian and trans topics as well as race and the treatment of femme characters See, as a femme who loves femmes , I was put off by the how men treated them and sometimes how the butch women treated them, too It was a mixed bag While I respect anyone s right to have the relationship dynamic they prefer, I found the whole every butch needs a femme thought process of Jess to be quite antiquated And lo and behold, the book turns that on its head, too I ve read relationships I ve never seen on TV I reiterate, this should be on TV.Another thing Generally, the sex worker characters were held up as the beautiful, real women they are And when the main character gets out of line there, she s corrected This really should occuroften.I ve rambled enough, I guess I m just so affected We live our everyday lives, at times forgetting the sacrifices those before us and those unlike us have endured for our lives to feeleveryday Now, I won t deny LGBT people are still in grave danger in many places even NYC , but I can feel the progress Neither dusk nor dawn type people should thrive, not just exist on the sidelines This is most certainly a should be 6 stars novel Full of pain and sadness, Stone Butch Blues thoughtfully reflects on working class lesbian life in America across the twentieth century s second half Starting in the 50s, the coming of age novel follows Jess Goldberg, a Jewish tomboy, as she runs away from her repressive home in upstate New York, in search of community, acceptance, and purpose In plain, powerful prose Feinberg charts Jess s struggle to find peace as a blue collar butch living and working in a highly exploitative, sexist socie Full of pain and sadness, Stone Butch Blues thoughtfully reflects on working class lesbian life in America across the twentieth century s second half Starting in the 50s, the coming of age novel follows Jess Goldberg, a Jewish tomboy, as she runs away from her repressive home in upstate New York, in search of community, acceptance, and purpose In plain, powerful prose Feinberg charts Jess s struggle to find peace as a blue collar butch living and working in a highly exploitative, sexist society The novel expertly captures the changing state of lesbian life and politics in the sixties and seventies, and insightfully muses about the ties between gender and sexuality 4.5 starsOne of the best queer novels I have ever read, Stone Butch Blues takes us back to the 1950s, a time replete with police raids, union riots, the Vietnam war, Stonewall, andThe novel follows Jess, a butch lesbian, as she progresses through her teen years to her adulthood The first person narration puts us right up and close with Jess, so we see her find herself and her identity as a teen, to when she falls in love with her first femme, to when she works in factories and starts to 4.5 starsOne of the best queer novels I have ever read, Stone Butch Blues takes us back to the 1950s, a time replete with police raids, union riots, the Vietnam war, Stonewall, andThe novel follows Jess, a butch lesbian, as she progresses through her teen years to her adulthood The first person narration puts us right up and close with Jess, so we see her find herself and her identity as a teen, to when she falls in love with her first femme, to when she works in factories and starts to unionize I had to finish this book on deadline to discuss it with one of my feminist book clubs, but even without that deadline I would have speeded through given how immersive Jess s perspective felt after 75 pages or so.I liked this book because of how honest, painful, and raw it felt There are a lot of graphic scenes in Stone Butch Blues, including sexual assault and physical beatings, so be warned However, I appreciated this content because Leslie Feinberg writes those scenes in such a way that honors the true homophobia, heterosexism, and transphobia that queer and trans people experienced and still experience in the United States Feinberg approaches the brutality of the queer experience with refreshing truthfulness, as well as the solidarity and resilience of queer and trans people From a writing perspective, I loved the dialogue in this novel it showcased Jess and her relationships to the many butches and femmes she found community and conflict with throughout her life so well The characters felt alive and distinct and I enjoyed that so much I did not even feel that bothered by the many, many romantic relationships Jess went through, given how Feinberg still emphasized the importance of queer community overall as well as had a little section where Jess read books and worked on herself without a romantic partner, too.This book reinvigorates me to fight for queer liberation in any way I can Feinberg does an excellent job showing how Jess s experience of sexual assault and trauma affects her relationships, and as someone in the mental health field I feel a renewed inspiration to provide compassionate and gender affirming care for those who have faced similar experiences of marginalization Through this book, Feinberg also touches on racism in the queer community, the rise of trans exclusionary radical feminism, and other divisive topics that still play out today When I finished Stone Butch Blues, I felt so grateful for Leslie Feinberg and other activists who have made my life as a queer person so much easier than it would have been than if I had lived several decades ago Recommended for those interested in queer narratives and social justice Leslie Feinberg s novel is one of those books that pops up on lists of influential or otherwise Must Read books over and over again In nearly all of its reviews, people praise it for being groundbreaking and representing the first real voice transgendered people had in the world of literature Indeed, Stone Butch Blues is a groundbreaking and monumental accomplishment.But that doesn t mean it s any good.There s a nice twist of irony in that every other character in the book is an over the top Leslie Feinberg s novel is one of those books that pops up on lists of influential or otherwise Must Read books over and over again In nearly all of its reviews, people praise it for being groundbreaking and representing the first real voice transgendered people had in the world of literature Indeed, Stone Butch Blues is a groundbreaking and monumental accomplishment.But that doesn t mean it s any good.There s a nice twist of irony in that every other character in the book is an over the top clich A wise, elderly Indian woman gives Jess a silver and turquoise ring which is meant to protect her Later, it s the Indians again in the workplace who understand and sympathize with her plight and, of course, the police are uniformly racist, sexist and abuse both their power and their prisoners to wild extremes It could be argued that s all intentional that Feinberg wanted to paint what is meant to be a rich and cliche shattering character against a backdrop of two dimensional, poorly scripted caricatures of racial, cultural and social stereotypes but I somehow doubt that was the case.I think the real problem was simply that the author wanted to cover too much ground Stone Butch Blues came out at a time when people weren t talking about transgendered people and the mainstream view of them was limited to Ed Wood s Glenn or Glenda and pulp fiction books that focusedon transvestism than transgender issues Feinberg clearly wanted to give every transgendered woman a voice but, in the process, her character comes off as a perpetual one upper Every hackneyed and tired tragedy that could befall someone in this position falls squarely on Jess poor shoulders From parents who distance themselves from her physically and emotionally to being institutionalized, raped, harassed, abused and, of course, ultimately only understood by mystical Native American Indians and prostitutes all of whom are classic Hooker With a Golden Heart types Jess checks all the boxes Almost no stone is left unturned and the end result isn t a character anyone can truly identify with but instead a grossly overshot character that is spread too thin The same problem comes through in dialogue between Jess and every other character in the book The characters themselves have no real depth and so their dialogue reads as stiff, wooden and completely unnatural Two bit characters are picked up, forgotten and then reintroduced later as if they were important Worst of all, despite all that happens to Jess there s really very little in terms of any sort of plot development It s just episode after tiresome episode vignettes that are apparently meant to be some sort of coming of age story but read like nothingmoving than a litany of poorly written, overly dramatic scenes from Jess life It makes it hard to care about what happens and evendifficult to see Jess as a real person which is, perhaps, the ultimate irony.So we ll give it a point for being groundbreaking at the time that s always worth something in my book If you re interested in reading something that has a historical significance to the LGBT feminisim gender movement, then absolutely this is worth your time If you re looking for a well written book about gender identity and stories of transgender people coming to terms with their lives there are better books out there I ll throw in another half star for the unintentional irony and bump it up to a full two stars as the book does come in with a built in drinking game Take a shot every time she uses the phrase so damn much and you might get drunk enough to think the book is better than it actually is I do not give many 5 star ratings just because I consider a 5 star rating to be hard to attain by anyone But I HAD to give 5 stars to this book I almost feel as if it is cliche to say this book is AMAZING since so many people feel the same way But I suppose that is just an attestment to the fine work that Leslie Feinberg has done in presenting Jess Goldberg s story and the struggle and oppression that she went through Utterly heartbreaking at times, this book will take you through the entire I do not give many 5 star ratings just because I consider a 5 star rating to be hard to attain by anyone But I HAD to give 5 stars to this book I almost feel as if it is cliche to say this book is AMAZING since so many people feel the same way But I suppose that is just an attestment to the fine work that Leslie Feinberg has done in presenting Jess Goldberg s story and the struggle and oppression that she went through Utterly heartbreaking at times, this book will take you through the entire rainbow of emotions as you read it I consider this book to be a must read for everyone I feel like if everyone were to read this book, so many things could be different in our world that is far to run by the gendered binaries and heteronormativity that exist within our society I would HIGHLY recommend this book to anyone and everyone This entire story is so important, but before I get into that, I just want to share the most important words in this novel which come at the end in Feinberg s own Acknowledgements I am typing these words as June 2003 surges with pride What year is it now, as you read them What has been won What has been lost I can t see from here I can t predict But I know this You are experiencing the impact of what we in the movement take a stand on and fight for today The present and past are the tra This entire story is so important, but before I get into that, I just want to share the most important words in this novel which come at the end in Feinberg s own Acknowledgements I am typing these words as June 2003 surges with pride What year is it now, as you read them What has been won What has been lost I can t see from here I can t predict But I know this You are experiencing the impact of what we in the movement take a stand on and fight for today The present and past are the trajectory of the future But the arc of history does not bend towards justice automatically as the great abolitionist Frederick Douglass said, without struggle there is no progress.I can say this with certainty If your life is being ground up in economic machinery and the burden of oppression is heavy on your back, you hunger for liberation, and so do those around you Look for our brightly colored banners coming up over the hill of the past and into your present Listen for our voices our protest chants drawing nearer Join us in the front ranks We are marching toward liberation.That s what the characters in Stone Butch Blues fought for The last chapter of this saga of struggle has not yet been written Leslie Feinberg died in the fall of 2014, so was not alive to see the legalization of same sex marriages in all 50 states in the United States I would have loved to have read her words on that topic, or seen her reaction She married her longtime partner in 2011, but I like to imagine that the she would have loved to have seen what happened on June 26, 2015 She would be proud.However, she also was not alive to witness the massacre that occurred just last weekend in an Orlando gay nightclub, Pulse The death of 49 innocent people who just wanted to dance is heartbreaking still to so many of us, and not just those who identify as gay It was a wake up call for many people, though it should never have come to this in the first place Massacres like this should not happen, and while I could now go on to talk about the ease of purchasing semi automatic firearms, I will not right now the point I make is that there is still too much fucking hate and intolerance.I was reading this book last weekend and after hearing about Orlando and reading article after article about the updates that followed, I had to put this book on hold The story is about Jess Goldberg, a masculine appearing girl growing up in America during the McCarthy era She identified as a butch lesbian before the Stonewall Riot of 1969, at a time where there was even less tolerance anddisgust and hatred directed at anyone who identified as something other than what they were born I had to put this book on the back burner last weekend because what happened in Orlando was so similar to what Jess was experiencing in the book, though instead of semi automatic firearms, Jess was beaten regularly just for going to a bar, often by cops, and she was threatened to be raped Others Jess knew, other lesbians, were raped, because they needed to be put in their place Shaking my fist I realized though that I wasn t helping anyone myself least of all by putting this book on hold I wanted to know what happened to Jess, I wanted to be there for her, and for everyone else who just wants to be accepted and understood for who they are It is not my place to question anyone s identification, and my heart breaks for everyone who still has to experience that just while walking down the street.This is not an easy book to read, but it is so important for everyone I doubt there is anyone who has ever felt 100% comfortable in their environment, or within their body For some it is even harder And for many their very lives are on the line because someone or a group of someones believe they know what is right for everyone else.This is not a perfect novel The writing is clunky and it s not always well written, but the experiences Jess has, and her struggle to find her place in the world, and to make her place in the world, and to keep her place in the world is really powerful This one was difficult to rate I give you a complicated review for a complicated book This is a coming of age novel of sorts about a transgendered gender queer person To be honest, I wasn t that into the first half of the book The writing feels really unpolished and forced, the characters lack any depth or description, and a lot of the narrative seems like a cold retelling of historical facts I m also totally unfamiliar with the lingo involved in the trans movement of the 50s and 60s, so I This one was difficult to rate I give you a complicated review for a complicated book This is a coming of age novel of sorts about a transgendered gender queer person To be honest, I wasn t that into the first half of the book The writing feels really unpolished and forced, the characters lack any depth or description, and a lot of the narrative seems like a cold retelling of historical facts I m also totally unfamiliar with the lingo involved in the trans movement of the 50s and 60s, so I often couldn t tell exactly what was going on The world portrayed by Feinberg seems very rule based Ironically, it seemed to have its own really unrelenting binary you re either a butch or a femme But since I wasn t totally familiar with the phrases going in, I felt lost for a lot of the action in the first half And the narrator never really describes what made hir feelmale Ze just describes wanting to wear hir father s clothes instead of hir mother s clothes But there s no feeling, no explanation, behind it Obviously, there wasto hir identity than a style preference, and I would have loved to see that described But the second half Oh man, the second half This is where Feinberg really found what ze was looking to say What the narrator makes perfectly clear is how possible it is for someone to exist in the space between outside of male and female Really, really The isn t some inkling self doubt or whimsical notion Our gender binary is doing some serious damage to a lot of people I have studied this stuff before, I have learned from biology books about all the different ways a person can be intersex, I ve been sympathetic and interested for a long time But this book helped me get it in a way I didn t before It is so easy to write off gender queer folks Conservatives say, You re perverting how God wanted you to be You are confused Liberals say, You are letting yourself be indoctrinated by the social constructs that tell you what gender should mean to you You are confused But really It is refreshing to read something that shows so beautifully that hey, this is real, this is not just something in someone s head People aren t sick or wrong or messed up Before, I got it, on an abstract intellectual level Now I feel like I get it better, on aemotional, experiential level I also super loved the analysis of how the economic struggles of workers are so interconnected with the struggle for gender queer folks to be safe and integrated I think we have definite cause to celebrate the progress we ve made on opening up space within that binary Lots of work has been done to highlight that space that is neither male nor female, but is that moment of infinite possibility that connects them p 270 But damn, we still have a LONG way to go on making our society safe for gender queer people The importance of this book, despite its pretty weak writing, earns it four stars {FREE} Ø Stone Butch Blues µ Woman or man This internationally acclaimed novel looks at the world through the eyes of Jess Goldberg, a masculine girl growing up in the Ozzie and Harriet McCarthy era and coming out as a young butch lesbian in the pre Stonewall gay drag bars of a blue collar town Stone Butch Blues traces a propulsive journey, powerfully evoking history and politics while portraying an extraordinary protagonist full of longing, vulnerability, and working class grit This once underground classic takes the reader on a roller coaster ride of gender transformation and exploration and ultimately speaks to the heart of anyone who has ever suffered or gloried in being different ok, I know everyone and their mom thinks this is the best book ever, and really it is quite amazing and so is everything that Leslie Feinberg does But i have to say besides all the reasons everyone loves this book I remember the exact moment I read the opening letter in this book and how I was totally blown away Not just because it was this brutally honest confession about being stone butch, but just because it that kind of letter where you say everything you ever meant to and it was beautiful ok, I know everyone and their mom thinks this is the best book ever, and really it is quite amazing and so is everything that Leslie Feinberg does But i have to say besides all the reasons everyone loves this book I remember the exact moment I read the opening letter in this book and how I was totally blown away Not just because it was this brutally honest confession about being stone butch, but just because it that kind of letter where you say everything you ever meant to and it was beautiful I read it like 3 times before i moved on to the rest of the book, and I wanted everyone including myself to have the courage to write friends and loved ones such amazing letters Then of course I went on the rest of the book which also blew me away and now 8 years later I still love this book and the opening letter