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My first exposure to Tim Winton was with his post Cloudstreet works The Rider, Dirt Music, Breath After those three novels, I read Cloudstreet, the work that has become an Australian institution I then decided to read his pre Cloudstreet novels An Open Swimmer, Shallows, That Eye That Sky, In the Winter Dark , anticipating a less mature production However, to my surprise, Winton s voice in those first four works was surprisingly strong.Of the four, Shallows seems closer in style and tone to My first exposure to Tim Winton was with his post Cloudstreet works The Rider, Dirt Music, Breath After those three novels, I read Cloudstreet, the work that has become an Australian institution I then decided to read his pre Cloudstreet novels An Open Swimmer, Shallows, That Eye That Sky, In the Winter Dark , anticipating a less mature production However, to my surprise, Winton s voice in those first four works was surprisingly strong.Of the four, Shallows seems closer in style and tone to his later works If, indeed, he seems somewhat less assured in the other three of his first novels, with Shallows, the descriptions of place are breathtaking, the dialogue, pitch perfect and the themes death, loss, family, redemption are played out with great reflective force.One new revelation hit me and that is Winton s comedic vein a gentle nod to a magic realism that re emerges in That Eye, the Sky and Cloudstreet His characters are often overwhelmingly somber they struggle with their pasts and are not always optimistic about their futures They are common people leading uncommon common lives Shallows ends on a vividly tragic note, leaving the reader with an image that jolts But amid the somber and the jolting, images like that of Des Pustling losing his teeth from bloodless gums or of Daniel Coupar traveling from his home to Angelus on a tractor are light hearted and playful That playfulness is repeated in his other works.The plot does move slowly and some reviewers have found that movement a distraction But Winton s novels focus on the development of characters, entwining them in the Australian landscape and in the quirks of their families and of the other characters The movement is in lives and not in actions Winton s novels are savored rather than gobbled He is good that Tim Winton fellow I hadn t heard of this book and neither had the friends I asked Set in Angelus Albany whaling industry protesters 3 different periods of history.He is a bit of a master Quite a powerful book Think I might have to read it again to take it all in The whaling industry has long ceased in Albany they ve figured out you can make money out of tourism but there is still the Japanese whaling so this is still a very relevant book for these times Well wo He is good that Tim Winton fellow I hadn t heard of this book and neither had the friends I asked Set in Angelus Albany whaling industry protesters 3 different periods of history.He is a bit of a master Quite a powerful book Think I might have to read it again to take it all in The whaling industry has long ceased in Albany they ve figured out you can make money out of tourism but there is still the Japanese whaling so this is still a very relevant book for these times Well worth a read Reminds me quite a bit of McCarthy s The Crossing Similar themes of futile deaths and wasted endeavours and humankind s intensely conflicted relationship with the other living things with which we share the planet I found it a slow narrative at first, but enjoyed the richness of the writing Main complaint is that not all of the subplots relating the large cast of townspeople seemed to have a lot of relevance to the conclusion I m still wondering why I spent to much time reading about the Rev Reminds me quite a bit of McCarthy s The Crossing Similar themes of futile deaths and wasted endeavours and humankind s intensely conflicted relationship with the other living things with which we share the planet I found it a slow narrative at first, but enjoyed the richness of the writing Main complaint is that not all of the subplots relating the large cast of townspeople seemed to have a lot of relevance to the conclusion I m still wondering why I spent to much time reading about the Reverend and small town real estate mogul Their dramas feel oddly disconnected from the core themes of the book The conclusion of this novel left me with a sense of hopelessness In fact, the novel felt like it has a pervading sense of gloom throughout The many characters are intensely morose.Yes, it s a serious subject that deserves intense consideration, but without the usual Winton humour it has a feeling of drab flatness, no pathway to redemption, just resignation and perhaps rightly so, since we are still defending the whales from human exploitation.The narrative is steeped in the historical and I f The conclusion of this novel left me with a sense of hopelessness In fact, the novel felt like it has a pervading sense of gloom throughout The many characters are intensely morose.Yes, it s a serious subject that deserves intense consideration, but without the usual Winton humour it has a feeling of drab flatness, no pathway to redemption, just resignation and perhaps rightly so, since we are still defending the whales from human exploitation.The narrative is steeped in the historical and I found it difficult to hold the narrative together, something of a saga condensed.And yes, it is faithful to how things were in 1978.The little cameo paragraphs are beautiful And the usual Winton immersion in the natural environment is ever present in this work I decided to give this book 3 stars because, while I didn t particularly enjoy it, I think it still addresses some important and interesting issues that are still relevant today, such as environmental animal activism and the questioning of tradition This is the first Tim Winton book I have read, and I was disappointed that I didn t enjoy it, given the frequency with which some of his other titles appear on lists of the best Australian literature, and also because I was drawn in by the ominous o I decided to give this book 3 stars because, while I didn t particularly enjoy it, I think it still addresses some important and interesting issues that are still relevant today, such as environmental animal activism and the questioning of tradition This is the first Tim Winton book I have read, and I was disappointed that I didn t enjoy it, given the frequency with which some of his other titles appear on lists of the best Australian literature, and also because I was drawn in by the ominous one word title I didn t feel connected with the story or characters Throughout, it felt as though I really was an outsider, or simply watching the story play out without really having any true understanding or inclusion in the character s lives This disconnection was yet another source of disappointment for me, as I do feel that the issues covered in the story are very relevant to myself and to the world today For example, the fishing and whaling industries are still ordamaging now, and there is still a conflict between tradition humans have always eaten and used sea creatures and should continue to do so and ethics the fact that we continue to over fish in the name of tradition and money despite knowing the negative impacts it is having on the environment and species Being someone that cares about the environment a lot, I really wanted to feel some sort of emotional connection with the characters in Shallows , but on the contrary felt rather indifferent throughout The story failed to get my heart racing, even though in my head, I wanted to find out what happened next, and my hopes for a positive outcome were left unfulfilled Despite the way I feel about this book, I suspect that Winton may have wanted the readers to feel this way The fact that I felt like a complete outsider with no understanding of the characters is exactly the kind of reception that the activists are given when they protest against whaling in Angelus told that they have no understanding of the importance of the whaling industry in that town, and to go home and let the workers alone This is a conflict of interests which reflects how I approached the book I wanted to find many characters sympathetic to the cause I would support, but was left disappointed In addition, I think Winton may have wanted readers to feel unemotional throughout because this reflects that many people do feel indifferent about environmental issues and it is very difficult to change people s minds, especially when the economy is so tightly linked to the industries that do the damage Overall, I can t say I enjoyed reading this book However, it is still worth reading both for its relevance to today s issues and for Winton s literary skill in making the reader feel a particular way, and maybe even to question their own beliefs Another truly amazing book from an Australian author who deserves every bit of acclaim he has ever received.The Shallows is set in a small Western Australian beach side town in the 70 s, it is a whaling town and the narratives that occurred around whaling in WA around Albany are woven into the story as are descriptions from diaries of the original whaling back when WA was still a penal colony The strongest themes of the story however are the people themselves, long term residents of the town an Another truly amazing book from an Australian author who deserves every bit of acclaim he has ever received.The Shallows is set in a small Western Australian beach side town in the 70 s, it is a whaling town and the narratives that occurred around whaling in WA around Albany are woven into the story as are descriptions from diaries of the original whaling back when WA was still a penal colony The strongest themes of the story however are the people themselves, long term residents of the town and their ties to the town, each other and their internal landscapes Winton has created such strong and convincing internal dialogues that it feels like we are a voice inside the heads of the characters in the book Like many of Winton s characters they are not necessarily particularly happy characters The motifs of uncertainty, loneliness and ineffectual are strong, some are just outright repugnant individuals, grasping and brutally uncaring of their fellow men The interesting thing about this book is how enjoyable I found these characters, normally I struggle to enjoy characters that I don t like but the empathy with which these characters are written means that it is no struggle to follow their lives.In terms of actual plot, we have Reverend Pell Yes, I know That knocked me back on my heels at first about to retire and concerned what will happen to the community and the congregation when his young replacement takes over We have Queenie Couper, born and raised in the area by her grandfather Daniel Couper and her freshly arrived husband Cleve Cookson When a group of objectors to whaling come to town and stage a demonstration at the whale processing plant, Queenie leaves her husband and takes up with them, since whales have been a constant part of her life and she feels strongly about them Meanwhile Cleve languishes in a no hope job wanting to bond with the town, reading the old journals given to him by Queenies grandfather which describe the early days of whaling and the experiences of a Couper ancestor.The way the book goes back and forth from person to person, from one point of view to another is fascinating The vivid scenes which the writing invokes in the reader are unique In this book we get a little less landscape than in some other books by the same author, but enough to make the place seem real Now,I know a lot of people do not revel in Winton s writing as much as I do Some people have described his stories as depressing, which I have never felt about them but in this book I finally understood what they might mean The sense of despair, aimlessness and hopelessness that the characters experience finally permeated my reading That might be because I was in a fairly bad place personally while reading parts of it, or it might be because reading about whaling is always a difficult subject for me Anyway now I get it Overall though, despite a few small blimps in the reading experience, the wealth of the characters, the beauty of the location and the fascination of the slowly unfolding plot won out and overall, I absolutely loved this book |READ DOWNLOAD ♕ Shallows ♪ Shallows is set in a small whaling town in Western Australia, where land based whaling has been a tradition for overyears When Queenie Cookson decides to join an antiwhaling protest group, she defies her husband, her ancestry, and her community Winner of the prestigious Miles Franklin Award in Australia, this eloquent and moving novel speaks with immediacy and passion of the conflict between the values of a closeknit, traditional society and the evolving s of the wider world Normally I love Tim Winton books However this one was tediously difficult to get through I found, as usual, his swallowing of a thesaurus tiring I decided to press on, I do not like to leave a book halfway through and found the drollness of the character background starting to drag me down As the book progressed, I found my interest starting to rise We finally get past the descriptive of the background for each character, and we start to actually feel for them Albeitthan halfway th Normally I love Tim Winton books However this one was tediously difficult to get through I found, as usual, his swallowing of a thesaurus tiring I decided to press on, I do not like to leave a book halfway through and found the drollness of the character background starting to drag me down As the book progressed, I found my interest starting to rise We finally get past the descriptive of the background for each character, and we start to actually feel for them Albeitthan halfway through the book The last few chapters were probably the best in the whole book and I actually enjoyed some of the revelations of the characters starting to match the whales progression.Would I recommend this book to someone who has not read Tim Winton before No Whilst it was insightful and interesting enough, it was bogged down by, almost, Dickensian style of descriptive To be honest, I found it depressing, and whilst I respect that fact of the whales being killed IS depressing, it was not a book I enjoyed I ve read four other books by this author and enjoyed them greatly This book was a struggle to get through I get why it won such critical praise its sparse, at times poetic, and tackles important issues of the time it was written, but for me it was very slow going None of the characters were all that interesting, and even from the very beginning I kept wondering is this a part two of another book The fleshing out of the characters what little was provided happened in drips and drabs, and ag I ve read four other books by this author and enjoyed them greatly This book was a struggle to get through I get why it won such critical praise its sparse, at times poetic, and tackles important issues of the time it was written, but for me it was very slow going None of the characters were all that interesting, and even from the very beginning I kept wondering is this a part two of another book The fleshing out of the characters what little was provided happened in drips and drabs, and again they just weren t that interesting.I still like the author but for me hiscurrent books are justinteresting This is Winton s second novel, published in 1985 My first Winton was Cloudstreet an approach I encourage others to avoid and I have read almost all of the others, so it seemed important to complete the catalogue This is an award winning book It has all of the things I love about a Winton novel exquisite descriptions of place, raw, real people, and a plot of angst, anger and human vulnerability Nevertheless, it just didn t grab me Set during the whaling protests of the 70s, it is, perh This is Winton s second novel, published in 1985 My first Winton was Cloudstreet an approach I encourage others to avoid and I have read almost all of the others, so it seemed important to complete the catalogue This is an award winning book It has all of the things I love about a Winton novel exquisite descriptions of place, raw, real people, and a plot of angst, anger and human vulnerability Nevertheless, it just didn t grab me Set during the whaling protests of the 70s, it is, perhaps, the setting and its horrors that kept me from loving it Or perhaps I m just too exhausted at the moment to give it my full attention I m not sure But it s a no from me