PDF î Red Rover ó eBook or Kindle ePUB free

PDF â Red Rover á Red Rover is both the name of a children s game and a formless spirit, a god of release and permission, called upon in the course of that game The red rover is also a thread of desire, and a clue to the forces of love and antipathy that shape our fate In her most innovative work to date, award winning poet and critic Susan Stewart remembers the antithetical forces falling and rising, coming and going, circling and centering revealed in such games and traces them out to many other cycles Ranging among traditional, open, and newly invented forms, and including a series of free translations of medieval dream visions and love poems, Red Rover begins as a historical meditation on our fall and grows into a song of praise for the green and turning world Well crafted work Bring your scholarly self to this read. The juxtapositions and give take of forms paired with highly allusive themes in lyric and accessible language, keep Stewart s collection engaging Accessible in language, but elliptical in themes and allusions, dynamic in its energy, but sometimes stayed in the concerns, Steward operates as a master of whiplash Highly allusive, rich in images from the natural world often Steward uses short lines and concrete imaginary, although the declarative will interrupt at moments adding texture and a nat The juxtapositions and give take of forms paired with highly allusive themes in lyric and accessible language, keep Stewart s collection engaging Accessible in language, but elliptical in themes and allusions, dynamic in its energy, but sometimes stayed in the concerns, Steward operates as a master of whiplash Highly allusive, rich in images from the natural world often Steward uses short lines and concrete imaginary, although the declarative will interrupt at moments adding texture and a natural voice to the poetry Enjoyable and rewards re reading I m bewitched These poems swoop, soar, propel you into the cosmos, and pull you underground The language is accessible, but meaning often alludes me That usually annoys me in poetry, but Stewart, from the very first poem, brought me under her spell Her use of language is musical, mystical, enchanting She gives us visions, dreams, childhood games, and familiar stories e.g., Adam and Eve Some poems are less ethereal, easier to grasp Yet, when I m most lost, I m still absorbing some ineffa I m bewitched These poems swoop, soar, propel you into the cosmos, and pull you underground The language is accessible, but meaning often alludes me That usually annoys me in poetry, but Stewart, from the very first poem, brought me under her spell Her use of language is musical, mystical, enchanting She gives us visions, dreams, childhood games, and familiar stories e.g., Adam and Eve Some poems are less ethereal, easier to grasp Yet, when I m most lost, I m still absorbing some ineffable meaning Her skilled use of repetition and alliteration casts a powerful chant like spell.The bird poems are my favorites She opens with The Owl The repetition, parallel phrases, and eerie tone reminded me of Poe s The Raven It starts I thought somehow a piece of cloth was tossedinto the night, a piece of cloth that flewup then across, beyond the window.A tablecloth or handkerchief, a knotsomehow unfolding, folded, pushing throughthe thickness of the dark Because of the title, I thought I knew what this poem was about until I got to I called this poem, the owl, the name that, like a key, locked out the darkand later let me close my book and sleepa winter dream Some of her most effective repetition is in the tragic poem, Elegy Against the Massacre at the Amish School in West Nickel Mines, Pennsylvania, Autumn 2006 Each short stanza begins with the names of five girls killed, but changes the order of the names This is followed by only three lines of text before repeating the names We, like the bereaved families, are struck with the blow of loss again and again Aside from the naming order, the first and last stanza are the same Lena, Mary Liz, and Anna MaeMarian, Naomi Rosewhen time has stoppedwhere time has slowedthe horses wear the rain I ll close with one of the simplest, most easily understood poems, Wrens, so opposite in tone from The Owl It reminds me, in its exuberance, of Gerard Manley Hopkins Beginning their tumbling joy, it closes I would not lose themcould not losethem knowif there sanotherplace anotherworld another lifethere must be wrens Was really surprised and delighted by the sounds of this book.