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!DOWNLOAD E-PUB ⚓ Out of This Century: Confessions of an Art Addict ♺ A patron of art since the s, Peggy Guggenheim, in a candid self portrait, provides an insider s view of the early days of modern art, with revealing accounts of her eccentric wealthy family, her personal and professional relationships, and often surprising portrayals of the artists themselves Here is a book that captures a valuable chapter in the history of modern art, as well as the spirit of one of its greatest advocatesphotos Peggy Guggenheim led a rich and interesting life Although, to her regret, her formal education did not extend beyond high school, shethan compensated for that deficiency by reading widely, traveling extensively, and immersing herself in a culture of writers and artists, many of whose careers she launched or significantly advanced The list of her friends acquaintances husbands lovers is formidable, including to mention just a very few Samuel Beckett, James Joyce, Man Ray, Marcel D Peggy Guggenheim led a rich and interesting life Although, to her regret, her formal education did not extend beyond high school, shethan compensated for that deficiency by reading widely, traveling extensively, and immersing herself in a culture of writers and artists, many of whose careers she launched or significantly advanced The list of her friends acquaintances husbands lovers is formidable, including to mention just a very few Samuel Beckett, James Joyce, Man Ray, Marcel Duchamp, Henry Moore, Salvador Dal , Yves Tanguy, Jackson Pollock, John Cage, and Max Ernst.Although Peggy s surname is generally associated with extraordinary wealth, her father s early death as a passenger on the Titanic yielded an inheritance that while substantial was considerably less than the fortunes amassed by other members of the Guggenheim family Accordingly, her occasional complaints about not having money for certain expenses may have had some justification Even so, she accumulated an astonishing personal collection of art works many of which eventually graced her splendid home, a Venetian palazzo that is now a museum One photo shows her standing in front of a Picasso painting, above which hangs a Calder mobile, and below which is a table supporting a Giacometti sculpture.Despite owning and managing a couple of galleries at different times one in London and one in New York City , Peggy Guggenheim did not view art collecting primarily as a commercial enterprise toward the end of her book she complains that the entire art movement had become an enormous business venture Only a few persons really cared for paintings The rest bought them from snobbishness or to avoid taxation Painters whose work I had sold with difficulty for six hundred dollars now received twelve thousand Guggenheim s sexual attitudes were well ahead of their time, and marriage her own or someone else s constituted no impediment to consummation when mutual attraction was present If the sixties had needed a role model, she could have provided it In her book she names the names of paramours, and offers sometimes startling reflections I am furious when I think of all the men who have slept with me while thinking of other men who have slept with me before She is also candid while describing, quite unselfconsciously, episodes of physical abuse that she endured from several partners one sphere in which wealth evidently affords no differentiation from what ordinary people experience.Unfortunately, the life of this fascinating and multi faceted woman deserves a much better account than she herself has written Out of This Century, which is actually a combination of two originally separate works, is a dutiful chronology, based apparently on diary entries, but the prose is one dimensional and generally boring Moreover, the book is padded with material that adds nothing of interest or substance The following, not atypical passage illustrates both deficiencies Here I gave a lot of dinner parties I cooked the dinners myself with the help of Fanny, Mary s maid, who came to me daily Nellie hated my home, she said there was no place to hang pictures Nevertheless I managed to place all the smaller ones The big ones had to remain in storage, where I could see then whenever I wanted Lacking a capable editor, Out of This Century is perhaps best approached by perusing the index for interesting entries of which there are many and jumping right to those pages That will catch the main themes while avoiding a lot of tedium I have mixed feeling about this book Someone who led the life Peggy Guggenheim led, living through two wars, moving between France, Italy, England, and America, and mixing with so many well known writers and artists has to have been an interesting person with an interesting life And while the first half of the book kept my interest as it went on I became a bit annoyed by what started to just seem like a laundry list of events and people without much explanation or introspection Things like, I have mixed feeling about this book Someone who led the life Peggy Guggenheim led, living through two wars, moving between France, Italy, England, and America, and mixing with so many well known writers and artists has to have been an interesting person with an interesting life And while the first half of the book kept my interest as it went on I became a bit annoyed by what started to just seem like a laundry list of events and people without much explanation or introspection Things like, I created a scene and Finally he left me because I created so many scenes What kinds of scenes About what Where When On the plus side, there were times when her understatement and honesty made me laugh.I did finish the book because I was curious about these people and wanted to know how their lives progressed The final chapters did rescue it somewhat the author added them years after the initial publication to update the memoir, and they did serve to humanize her Recommended if you are interested in the period and the personalities Not recommended if you are looking for a great piece of writing Peggy Guggenheim is no doubt a fascinating person who lived an amazingly interesting life I loved hearing about her relationships with famous artists and all the drama in her life there is an extreme abundance of drama It started to get a bit gossipy to me and I rolled my eyes quite a bit at the immature and bad behavior which is a lot I m glad I read it It could use some editing. Some context, first at the 2015 TriBeCa Film Festival, I halfheartedly went to see a documentary called Art Addict about Peggy Guggenheim The reason I was lukewarm about going was that all I knew about the Guggenheims were that they were rich and white, and had a hyped up museum where people who annoy me go Instagramming themselves at benefits I ended up being totally schooled about a woman who, like flapper dresses and the Jazz Age itself, receded from the memory of the general public to t Some context, first at the 2015 TriBeCa Film Festival, I halfheartedly went to see a documentary called Art Addict about Peggy Guggenheim The reason I was lukewarm about going was that all I knew about the Guggenheims were that they were rich and white, and had a hyped up museum where people who annoy me go Instagramming themselves at benefits I ended up being totally schooled about a woman who, like flapper dresses and the Jazz Age itself, receded from the memory of the general public to the effect that not a fraction of what she should be credited with doing and creating is properly acknowledged A member of a branch dangling precariously off of a rather insane family tree, she went as a little girl from great inherited heights to losing her father who had lost his fortune in the sinking of the Titanic Emerging from this beginning, she went on to become a mother and a Bohemian socialite, but then in her early middle life went on to find, curate, popularize, dignify, define, and preserve the canon of modern art as the world knows it The documentary is emphasized by tape recordings of the last interview she ever gave in life At one point, the interviewer asks her if she isn t jealous of people s youths as she grows older Scarcely missing a beat, she replied that she s certainly jealous that they ll continue to live I burst into tears and stayed there crying in the back of the theater as the credits rolled Pretty much obsessed, I went and located Confessions of an Art Addict Peggy Guggenheim But as slim as the volume was, I found myself being disappointed that the book just wouldn t take In June 2018, I found myself in the unlikely situation of going to Venice the city where she ultimately made her home and the destination of her collection for all perpetuity for a childhood friend s wedding I brought my mother, an artist herself, as my companion, and there was no question on our minds that a priority was to visit the Guggenheim collection But between being bewitched by every random crevice of that city, beguiled by its wild ferry system, and anchored to the romantic and joyous events of the wedding, we barely made to the little museum on a little island on the way we were to leave We even had all of our luggage with us and checked it in at the building It would be going too far to say that I was disappointed by the museum, but I had built it up so much in my head only to be most interested in pictures of Peggy Guggenheim herself, which were put up in small frames ininferior locations, like a stuffy hallway by the restrooms There in the gift hall, I found this book I m very careful about the condition of my books, and this paperback had that glossy, heavy look that made me debate whether or not I couldn t just order it from somewhere once back in the United States Besides, shouldn t I finish her smaller biography After some hemming and hawing, I bought it, and then took nearly a year to start it, taking care at all times not to dogear the cover or crack the spine while running all around the tunnels and throngs of New York City reading it.And what can I say, this book really did it for me I think it makes sense because this is the original autobiography that she later condensed into that other little book I couldn t get through, PLUS a reverent foreward by Gore Vidal, the latter half of what she wrote at age 80, and an introduction that she wrote to a book about the city of Venice It s the most whole version of her life story I know of, straight from the source There s been a lot of criticism from the haters who find the autobiography of Peggy, or her very life, to be insultingly frivolous, insensitive, name dropping, or what have you There are certainly criticisms about how her writing lacks style or magic I obviously disagree with these criticisms She does a hell of a job packing in details of world travels, social evolution, eras of style and thought, and her own eccentric life surrounded by eccentric people, all while sounding like an actual normal person At all times, she is completely transparent, raw, and self aware, for instance, admitting that she was looking for fathers in men, talking about her abortion, and sharing how she retrospectively can t believe how she lounged about drinking wine in cafes with a lover while World War II refugees, casualties, and even concentration camp victims were transported by the trainload through Paris, which was being bombed by the Germans but not wallowing despicably in guilt after all is said and done And let s remember that she used her money or whatever, her family s money to preserve the paintings that millions go to worship in safety all over the planet, and save the lives of every artist or creative in her circles who she could And she never talks up her good deeds unless maybe someone does her dirty without a glimmer of thanks Like Hemingway, she just relates things in clipped, simple language, whether it be descriptions, emotions, thoughts, or happenings This allows the tales of her life and her times to be told at a pace that really pulls you along on her coattails I always hated to stop the momentum and spent a couple of nights outside my commute time just reading to satisfy the itch of wondering what would come next, to quench the desire just to read her voice To hear her off the page and past the grave.Even as a poorer Guggenheim, she was pretty much filthy rich But her life story is a glaring example of how action and art, not money, bought her swaths of of happiness and triumph in an unbelievably eventful life It is easy to see that what money did do was to enable her to live like a man, fully and without fear or reproach, even while suffering everything like all women.It s entirely to her own credit, however, that she was of a force of will with the character, bravery, and sense of adventure to maximize her station in life unapologetically, and cleverly Any time that she made poor decisions, it was always in the name of some passion or another, and my god, she had game it seems that she slept with every great artist, writer, and intellectual spanning a half of a century And it was fine because she lived outside the box, making today s polyamory proselytizers look like vanilla.And she did show her grit time and time again in periods of emotional abandonment, personal loss, and even bankruptcyplus a whole lot of domestic violence from her cavalier comments of the husbands and lovers who often threw her into walls, slapped her face, threw whiskey in her eyesHere are some choice zinger that are but splashes in the pan of her burning bright existence But then I am not the kind of person to accept anything as it is I always think I can change the situation The incredible thing is that I never believe in failure, and no one can convince me that I cannot move mountains or stop the tide until I have proved to myself that I can t I hate men who criticize me without dominating me I much preferred my modest barchessa in Venice, and for the first time I did not regret the enormous fortune I had lost when my father left his brothers to go into his own business, a few years before he was drowned on the Titanic In fact, I do not like art today I think it has gone to hell, as a result of the financial attitude I consider it one s duty to protect the art of one s time It s awful when I hear a person of this magnitude reduced to a Guggenheim, a socialite, or, most boring of all, a patron of the arts She wasthan that she was a visionary She was a leader and guard of her times In being so much herself, she did the selfless thing and left beauty in her eternal wake, whether or not anyone knows or respects that she was the source And she was goddamn interestingand interested.Even those who don t have any such rapturous feelings about Peggy Guggenheim can probably enjoy this book very much at face value And in the special appendix, those who have been to Venice will be rewarded both with chills and fuzzy feelings at how well she describes the place and how little it s apparently changed at its watery core This at first reads irritatingly like the diary of a rich spoilt brat, and Peggy Guggenheim s behaviour think drinking champagne at cafe terraces while refugees stream into Paris fleeing the nazis is at times shocking At the same time this obsession with personal freedom makes her a subversive figure Going against the expectations imposed on women in the 30s and 40s, she forged her own path and yes, the money helped a great deal This autobiography, written mostly in the 40s with post This at first reads irritatingly like the diary of a rich spoilt brat, and Peggy Guggenheim s behaviour think drinking champagne at cafe terraces while refugees stream into Paris fleeing the nazis is at times shocking At the same time this obsession with personal freedom makes her a subversive figure Going against the expectations imposed on women in the 30s and 40s, she forged her own path and yes, the money helped a great deal This autobiography, written mostly in the 40s with postscripts in 1960 and again just before her death in 1979 , is highly entertaining and somehow devoid of pretension This latter quality goes a long way towards excusing the rather pedestrian prose But what a life Her contribution to modern art is staggering, as a dealer and collector and a champion of artists she discovered Jackson Pollock and , arguably, Lucien Freud With lovers like Samuel Beckett, Max Ernst and Marcel Duchamp, and friends like Truman Capote, Andre Breton, Man Ray and Joseph Losey, the juicy anecdotes keep coming What makes this book special is that these accounts of the colourful lives of expat or refugee artists in 1940s France were written in the thick of it, without the full benefit of historical hindsight Such an entertaining and lively read What I love is the tone where every objective difficulty such as, ahem, World War II is either an adventure or a silly thing that keeps Peggy from opening yet another gallery or organizing the next show Art in the broad sense is what matters the most.You can read it as a gossip column about the artists and art of the century pun intended And you will be right Or you can read it as an account of an extraordinary human life And you will be right, undou Such an entertaining and lively read What I love is the tone where every objective difficulty such as, ahem, World War II is either an adventure or a silly thing that keeps Peggy from opening yet another gallery or organizing the next show Art in the broad sense is what matters the most.You can read it as a gossip column about the artists and art of the century pun intended And you will be right Or you can read it as an account of an extraordinary human life And you will be right, undoubtedly I ve visited the Peggy Guggenheim museum in Venice 3 times over the pass 15 years I think its one of my favourite museums So its easy to say I admire Peggy, the museum and her love for collecting art So I finally read her book after visiting the museum in the summer of 2014 and I could not put the book down I was in awe of her luxurious life not always in a good way though she was very rich, had no boundaries, naive and spoiled at the same time very giving She was a rebel It was intr I ve visited the Peggy Guggenheim museum in Venice 3 times over the pass 15 years I think its one of my favourite museums So its easy to say I admire Peggy, the museum and her love for collecting art So I finally read her book after visiting the museum in the summer of 2014 and I could not put the book down I was in awe of her luxurious life not always in a good way though she was very rich, had no boundaries, naive and spoiled at the same time very giving She was a rebel It was intriguing to read about her sexual appetite and her group of artist friends However, she did amazing work for the art world and helped so many artist such as Max Ernest, Jackson Pollock and other abstract and Surrealism artist from the 20th century I think she deserves credit just for that itself, considering this was between the 1920 s 1950 s And thanks to her museum collection, she was the one to introduce me to surrealism, Max Ernest at the age of 19 years old Further, it was great reading about her travels, adventures through Europe, specially if you ve been around, France, Switzerland, Italy and so on, though how the roads and scenery must of been back then, before WWIlWorth reading it you re an art lover 20th century art and travelling to Venice Being in the proximity of Modernism feels like a backstage pass to your favourite band s gig Which is kind of awesome.I was quite intrigued by Peggy s life and choice of men, but I eventually arrived at the conclusion that one mustn t say too much about other people s memoirs and definitely mustn t judge based on their own value system So there you are if you re into Cubism, Abstract Expressionism and Surrealism, give it a try and don t be too harsh on her. During WWI, while still in her teens, Guggenheim inherited 450,000 a LOT of money at the time.Given that she knew and supported many famous artists, traveled widely, and lived a highly unconventional life, her recounting of it is understated, somewhat detached, as though she doesn t expect it to be particularly interesting to readers She deeply grieved some major losses of her father on the Titanic, a long time lover due to medical incompetence, and a friend in a car accident The lasting lo During WWI, while still in her teens, Guggenheim inherited 450,000 a LOT of money at the time.Given that she knew and supported many famous artists, traveled widely, and lived a highly unconventional life, her recounting of it is understated, somewhat detached, as though she doesn t expect it to be particularly interesting to readers She deeply grieved some major losses of her father on the Titanic, a long time lover due to medical incompetence, and a friend in a car accident The lasting loves of her life were her Lhasa dogs, her home in Venice, and of course collecting modern art, which left a priceless legacy for future generations.I also watched the 2015 documentary Peggy Guggenheim Art Addict which I liked better than the book