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What a dream like experience What a surreal narrative I actually did not expect it to have some sort of plot, which it did and also didn t at the same time It was about that little Almajero tavern and its temporary population That s all there is to know What fallows are surreal dream like conversations, visions, dreams, magic, sighs and paintings Prayers and infidelities, revenges and loses of virginity and innocence And sea Sea Sea Where are its eyes Where are its borders And why d What a dream like experience What a surreal narrative I actually did not expect it to have some sort of plot, which it did and also didn t at the same time It was about that little Almajero tavern and its temporary population That s all there is to know What fallows are surreal dream like conversations, visions, dreams, magic, sighs and paintings Prayers and infidelities, revenges and loses of virginity and innocence And sea Sea Sea Where are its eyes Where are its borders And why does it call you A book like that needsthan one reading, and I feel like I might revisit it in the future, with different set of mind I feel like this is that ind of book, where you read it and every time you find something new, something you haven t seen before Probably one of the best books I have read in my life Unbelievably true and beautiful. Let me Drown in this gorgeous book One of the first books I read with an overall poetic prose, a speculative fiction of sorts It s been years, decades, lifetime maybe, but I feel like I m still adrift in that ocean. And the award for getting me out of my comfort zone goes to Alessandro Baricco I have never read anything written by him and I m not sure I will in the near future but this little thing was like a breath of somewhat fresh air Yes, yes, yes, it s about the sea, the overwhelming, powerful, healing, cruel, regenerating etc sea And about the not so original idea of bringing a bunch of unknown, totally different people together And how the sea is their friend or nemesis, how it all starts w And the award for getting me out of my comfort zone goes to Alessandro Baricco I have never read anything written by him and I m not sure I will in the near future but this little thing was like a breath of somewhat fresh air Yes, yes, yes, it s about the sea, the overwhelming, powerful, healing, cruel, regenerating etc sea And about the not so original idea of bringing a bunch of unknown, totally different people together And how the sea is their friend or nemesis, how it all starts where, Plasson and ends where, Bartleboom with it.Sometimes I felt I was eating a leftover salad with different things thrown in the mix theater poetry stream of consciousness and I was trying to identify which is which, separate potatoes from onions and olives, but then again, a salad is a salad, it s better not to overthink it I am no fan of postmodernism, but I did like his writing even though it sounded a bit pretentious here and there Oh, and that particular episode with Bartleboom trying to find the woman of his dreams, that was the funniest thing I ve read in years And yes, I went to the sea while reading the book and I thought about it, how cheesy is that One of my fave books ever Baricco, you either love him or hate him, there s no inbetween I don t know how this particular edition I own the original, in Italian , so I can t really vouch for the translation, but the Italian version caught my breath away You laugh and you cry, you smile and you hurt, and smile again The beginning is confusing because of Baricco s peculiar writing style and the plot well, let s face it, the plot is weird, but it s a good kind of weird imho Just give t One of my fave books ever Baricco, you either love him or hate him, there s no inbetween I don t know how this particular edition I own the original, in Italian , so I can t really vouch for the translation, but the Italian version caught my breath away You laugh and you cry, you smile and you hurt, and smile again The beginning is confusing because of Baricco s peculiar writing style and the plot well, let s face it, the plot is weird, but it s a good kind of weird imho Just give this novel and Baricco a chance, if you happen to go huh while reading the first 50 pages You won t regret it.The imagery is stunning , btw It s like a fairy tale and yet it is not Oh definately not There s romance and drama, but it has very dark pages There is something almost hypnotic about this book, drawing the reader into its setting, into the sea The writing is lyrical and lovely and I was impressed by the depth the author was able to achieve in under 250 pages, especially considering the multiple interwoven storylines I felt fully invested in each of the character s narratives and each of the characters felt very real, even with the somewhat ethereal feel of the book as a whole A truly masterful work. This is one of those books I always return to be it I m feeling a tad melancholic, or happy beyond words, or sad beyond a doubt Baricco s lyrical style and the ease in which his sentences flow is very similar to the river and the metaphor of the ocean sea he uses in this work and others You feel kind of lulled by the language, taken on a slow, magical journey and the emotions it invokes are also as diverse and as soft I don t know how better to describe it, but this book has so much b This is one of those books I always return to be it I m feeling a tad melancholic, or happy beyond words, or sad beyond a doubt Baricco s lyrical style and the ease in which his sentences flow is very similar to the river and the metaphor of the ocean sea he uses in this work and others You feel kind of lulled by the language, taken on a slow, magical journey and the emotions it invokes are also as diverse and as soft I don t know how better to describe it, but this book has so much beauty it s simply overwhelming I understand this may not appeal to some readers and there are times when his imagery and descriptions could be said to be a bit self indulgent, but I didn t really mind these one or two moments because on the whole, the book was stunning The story itself stories, that is is also dream like and sort of airy, there isn t a lot that happens per se, not in the usual sense For me, it mostly felt like reading someone s letters and in some cases, that was the case , or diary, or just seeing flashbacks from a person s past The book has a very surreal quality to it, and as such, I think it should be regardedas poetry or a painting because it invokes that kind of a sentiment that of a brilliant piece of art Imagine the most perfect bite of the most decadent dish melting in your mouth and giving you indescribable pleasure Imagine the most harmonic melody caressing your ear Imagine a picture so perfect that you find yourself in it This is the kind of prose you have the pleasure devouring Ocean Sea is a picture painted with words, that has its own melody to it It s the finest poetry in form of a novel The main character here is The Sea doctor, killer, God Every now and then people d Imagine the most perfect bite of the most decadent dish melting in your mouth and giving you indescribable pleasure Imagine the most harmonic melody caressing your ear Imagine a picture so perfect that you find yourself in it This is the kind of prose you have the pleasure devouring Ocean Sea is a picture painted with words, that has its own melody to it It s the finest poetry in form of a novel The main character here is The Sea doctor, killer, God Every now and then people disturb its perfection but that doesn t bother The Sea people come and go, but The Sea it s here, always was, always will be, nothing will overshadow its magnificence There is not muchI can say any better than Alessandro Baricco I loved this book so much I would give it six stars if I could Highly recommended for everybody who enjoys fine art There was about a minute when I was a little girl when I wanted to play baseball with the boys, and my dad was trying to teach me some stuff I was about five when this happened, but I remember one of the first things he said to me was that, You can t always swing for the fences Which was good advice, because not only did I miss the ball most of the time, but given the size and the velocity at which I swung the bat,often than not I ended up flat on my butt But the boys were watching an There was about a minute when I was a little girl when I wanted to play baseball with the boys, and my dad was trying to teach me some stuff I was about five when this happened, but I remember one of the first things he said to me was that, You can t always swing for the fences Which was good advice, because not only did I miss the ball most of the time, but given the size and the velocity at which I swung the bat,often than not I ended up flat on my butt But the boys were watching and I wanted to beat them, so I swung for the fences anyway Cycle, rinse, repeat.In the prose and subject matter of Ocean Sea Baricco seems to have adopted a somewhat similar mentality Granted his goal is probably a bitnoble Rather than beating neighborhood boys, he wants to provide a meditation on the idea of the sea, what it has meant, what it used to mean and what it has become, and most importantly, what possibilities it holds for people who need it Given that I ve just spent a semester reading about the Mediterranean, the Mare Nostrum, the Middle Sea, the fault line of conflicts for a thousand years, and now possibly the most overdetermined space in the history of ever, I was interested to hear what he had to say I think possibly his best idea, which he didn t spend enough time on, is how the meaning of oceans changed in the 18th and 19th century Their original status and of course we must keep in mind that I m talking about status among Europeans was as threatening, Other spaces where monsters dwelled and Satan ruled, but when the English started an empire that was based on the sea, it could not be a free space given over to pirates any longer No, the sea had to be made something respectable, where proper Englishmen could and should go to find glory and make a living The sea had to be tamed, in other words And what better way to do this than by allowing, nay, advising women to go to the sea in fact having medical doctors say that the sea was healthy for you If this was a space where weak women whose honor must be protected could go though of course with prescribed limits , well then who could not approve of it Baricco has a wonderful few pages where he describes women at the sea, and in particular the curtained sea baths that allowed them to take part in its healing properties while staying within respectable boundarieswomen The sea suddenly seemed to have been waiting for them forever To listen to the doctors, it had been there, for millennia, patiently perfecting itself, with the sole and precise intention of offering itself as a miraculous unguent for their afflictions of body and soul Just as, while sipping tea in impeccable drawing rooms, impeccable doctors weighing their words well in order to explain with paradoxical courtesy would tell impeccable husbands and fathers over and over that the disgust for the sea, and the shock and the terror was in reality a seraphic cure for sterility, anorexia, nervous exhaustion, overexcitement, menopause, anxiety and insomnia An ideal experience inasmuch as it was a remedy for the ferments of youth and a preparation for wifely duties A solemn baptism for young ladies to become women we could think of a woman respected loved, mother, woman For whatever reason illness brought to a sea that she would otherwise never have seen Her hair hangs loose and she is barefoot and this is not a mere detail, it is absurd, along with that little white tunic and the trousers that leave her ankles exposed, you could imagine her slim hips, it is absurd, only her boudoir has seen her like this, and yet, like that, there she is on an enormous beach, where there is no one of the viscous, stagnant air of the bridal bed, but the gusty sea breeze, bearing the edict of a wild freedom removed and it is clear she cannot feel it They were drinking the sea water, things had gone that far, the water that until the day before had been horror and disgust, and the privilege of a forlorn and barbarous humanity Now they were sipping it, those same divine invalids who waled along the water s edge imperceptibly dragging one leg It was the same world as ever that had suddenly been transferred, for wholly medical purposes, to the edge of an abyss abhorred for centuries and now chosen as the promenade of suffering The wave bath the doctors called it a kind of patented sedan chair for getting into the sea, it was for the ladies obviously to protect them from indiscreet eyes Only science can do certain things, this is the truth To sweep away centuries of disgust the horrendous sea womb of corruption and death and invent that idyll little by little spreading to all the beaches of the world I liked this part I think he s right about a lot I loved the way that Baricco wrote about the sea as a negotiation between civilization and freedom, and saints and madmen, between tradition and the possibilities of the future, as a place where things are erased, where there can by definition be no firm foundations, where everything changes and nothing does, where time seems to stop because of its very repetitiveness I think Baricco is getting at an argument that is only now coming to the fore in the many studies of the sea that have been released in the last few years Maybe it is fitting that it took an Italian an Italian who would include a priest in his cast of characters, to do it However, the unfortunate part is that he didn t really live up to these ideas The swinging for the fences prose, first of all The part I quoted above was probably the best part, and I liked it But the vast majority of it he was going for poetry, that much was obvious Unfortunately, when you go for that in print, I think that you have to go about it in a particular way Either you re Nabokov and you can do what the hell you want, or you have to mix it in with other things Your metaphor may be flowery or unusual, but you must surround it with plain or unobtrusive prose that leads up to it and away from it And most of all, there must be a point to it For example, at one point, Baricco writesOnly after a little did the gardener s footsteps engrave themselves on the silenceFirst of all, I think I wrote that when I was 15 Second of all, the metaphorical word choice there serves absolutely no purpose except to show me that Baricco spent far too much time thinking of a better way to say, he walked away Thirdly, shut up There was also another pretty unbearable sex scene where he uses the structure of the inexorable waves to explain the different reasons why a young girl and a middle aged man would want to have sex with each other Now there s a subject that oneman definitely needed to rhapsodize badly about sighs, sighs in Elisewin s throat soaring velvet, sighs at each new step in that world that crosses mountains never seen and lakes with forms unimaginable whoever would have said that by kissing the eyes of a man you could see so far away by caressing the legs of a young girl you could run so fast and escape escape from everything to see so far awayVOMIT If you re going for the oldest subject in the book you better bring it, man I could go on, but I think you get the idea Overwrought, overly dramatic, and once he s finished expressing his few ideas about the sea, all he s got left is filling in the blanks by repeating himself inandfanciful ways.I also thought the structure was both weird and off putting It starts off with a section that is half straightforward prose, half impressionistic, but leans strongly towards the impressionism by the end of it He s big on ellipses, on not identifying speakers, on not finishing sentences and wise children who can read your mind VOMIT, again They volley minimalistic profundity back and forth to each other and almost never reach a place that goes deeper than that with few exceptions The ocean bit I talked about above, and there s another lovely bit about Elisewin s father arranging her journey to the sea I liked when he started to veer into fully formed fairy tale, I hated when he tried to turn his prose into poetry In a wincingly literal fashion at times one or a few words per line, stopping paragraphs and starting them in the middle of the next, etc Ugh Didn t we leave this novelist poet envy back in the 18th century There was a part that ALMOST worked with a priest who wrote unusual and specific prayers A Prayer for a Little Boy Who Cannot Say the Letter R, Prayer for a Man Who Is Falling into a Ravine obviously it is very short , but then he felt the need to write out the prayers rather than just tell me the wonderful titles and let me imagine it for myself And unfortunately, the execution did not live up to the imagination As with most of this book.The next section was stream of consciousness, set up in a mockingly twelve days of Christmas sort of incantation, with a conflict that s clearly drawn from the shipwreck that inspired this Gericault painting and a scandal that became an enduring part of French history But the conflict set up because of it was obvious and banal I hate this thing writers do where they put their otherwise flimsy tales into the context of some great historical event World War II stories of any kind, all those Regency romance writers who use the Napoleonic wars to try to give their stories some sort of weight and get prizes Using the shield of historical events that are virtually off limits to criticism to block criticism of your writing by giving you some sort of impenetrable moral superiority is pretty cowardly and lazy I don t mind the use of big events, but either tell me somethinginteresting than Hitler is bad, or write your book in such a way that, Hitler is bad, seems new again Baricco did not accomplish this Which meant that his closing section, which was essentially an extended epilogue, had no emotional impact at all except for perhaps the chapter about the seductress as the book jacket calls her who wrote a long letter to her lover begging for the freedom to be by herself Which of course, he ignores And THAT ends super well Argh, MEN And then, on top of all that, as if this whole exercise weren t already incredibly self indulgent and pointless, he felt the need to insert himself into the last chapter for no reason whatsoever Other than to establish what He wrote this by the sea He is finished contemplating the sea Yes I saw that there were only a few pages left Why did we need this announcement It s hardly heart rending when you saw to it yourself that most of the characters were vague and representative rather than fully formed humans in fact at every point where they seemed almost human, where I almost formed a picture of someone I knew, you stopped abruptly and wrote another terrible poem You know what this was like It was like someone deliberately trying to write a book consisting only of things he doesn t know very much about, in styles he s not very good at Every time something natural to him came out, he quashed it, ruthlessly Was this book an experiment of some kind A punishment Why would he keep swinging for something and landing on his butt I don t know, but in the end, I think that Baricco should have let himself breathe a bit I think we all would have enjoyed ourselves much `Download Book ✙ Oceano mare ☔ Oceano mare racconta del naufragio di una fregata della marina francese, molto tempo fa, in un oceano Gli uomini a bordo cercheranno di salvarsi su una zattera Sul mare si incontreranno le vicende di strani personaggi Come il professore Bartleboom che cerca di stabilire dove finisce il mare, o il pittore Plasson che dipinge solo con acqua marina, e tanti altri individui in cerca di s , sospesi sul bordo dell oceano, col destino segnato dal mare E sul mare si affaccia anche la locanda Almayer, dove le tante storie confluiscono Usando il mare come metafora esistenziale, Baricco narra dei suoi surreali personaggi, spaziando in vari registri stilistici