.Read Epub ☢ Making Refuge: Somali Bantu Refugees and Lewiston, Maine ⚕ eBooks or Kindle ePUB free

An amazing story about the Somali Bantu refugees and all the challenges they faced before and after they came to America It really opened my eyes to how much we truly take for granted here, all of our expectations when this group of people like many others that have seeked refuge here only want a chance to make a better life and just survive The section that talks about the top 10 myths about the Somali Bantu refugees was extremely eye opening to me, I had heard many of them and didn t really An amazing story about the Somali Bantu refugees and all the challenges they faced before and after they came to America It really opened my eyes to how much we truly take for granted here, all of our expectations when this group of people like many others that have seeked refuge here only want a chance to make a better life and just survive The section that talks about the top 10 myths about the Somali Bantu refugees was extremely eye opening to me, I had heard many of them and didn t really think about the opinions and biases that existed within me until I read that After reading all of the facts and finishing this book I have to admit I was a little ashamed of the preconceived thoughts opinions I had without any real evidence or basis for them I thank the author for sharing all of that and I am so happy I had the opportunity to read this book Read this ethnography for a ruthless expos on the contradictions of humanitarian aid NGOs details the refugee experience from fleeing a civil war that turned pastoralists into militiamen through to the xenophobic not so happily ever after resettlement process in America Read this ethnography for a ruthless expos on the contradictions of humanitarian aid NGOs details the refugee experience from fleeing a civil war that turned pastoralists into militiamen through to the xenophobic not so happily ever after resettlement process in America This ethnography is highly readable and informative, and I wholeheartedly recommend it There s so much to learn from this book about refugee experience and the focus on a particular group of Somali Bantus settled in the United States makes itpersonal than theoretical My partner is from Lewiston, and he bought this book for me because he knew I was interested in the background and details of the resettlement in Lewiston But Catherine Besteman doesthan provide the details She does This ethnography is highly readable and informative, and I wholeheartedly recommend it There s so much to learn from this book about refugee experience and the focus on a particular group of Somali Bantus settled in the United States makes itpersonal than theoretical My partner is from Lewiston, and he bought this book for me because he knew I was interested in the background and details of the resettlement in Lewiston But Catherine Besteman doesthan provide the details She does a great job connecting the dots between the particulars of the Somali Bantu s story to larger understandings about the politics of refugee camps, humanitarian aid, immigration, and xenophobia I also appreciated how she made clear connections between the history of colonialism, international aid, and world politics to the particulars of Somalia s civil war and the subsequent refugee crisis The things I learned from this book has given me a better understanding of refugee experience and especially how resettlement is not a happily ever after ending to the story that we imagine I hope thatpeople pick this up and gain as much new knowledge as I did Dr Besteman writes a wonderful recount of her reunion with old friends she had met in her previous field work in Somalia and how those refugees are resettling in America It s a wonderful story of how immigration isthan assimilation of the immigrants but rather how new communities have to adapt together to form new understandings of each other This book tells a refreshing perspective on Immigration here in the U.S that means a lot in such a politically tense time I feel this book takes Dr Besteman writes a wonderful recount of her reunion with old friends she had met in her previous field work in Somalia and how those refugees are resettling in America It s a wonderful story of how immigration isthan assimilation of the immigrants but rather how new communities have to adapt together to form new understandings of each other This book tells a refreshing perspective on Immigration here in the U.S that means a lot in such a politically tense time I feel this book takes a nice breath of fresh air on the subject It s not too anthropologically dense and I feel anyone would be able to understand the book and the implications Besteman is trying to make Overall a good read for those interested in Immigration It s an odd experience to read an ethnography the subject of which is the city one works in, many of the informants for which are people one knows I would recommend this book, however, to anyone, not just those with personal ties to Lewiston, for it serves as a kind of handbook for how to stop seeing like a state, and start seeing like a refugee And in my opinion, the latter will become an increasingly necessary disposition, not only for remaining humane, but for survival My only quibble It s an odd experience to read an ethnography the subject of which is the city one works in, many of the informants for which are people one knows I would recommend this book, however, to anyone, not just those with personal ties to Lewiston, for it serves as a kind of handbook for how to stop seeing like a state, and start seeing like a refugee And in my opinion, the latter will become an increasingly necessary disposition, not only for remaining humane, but for survival My only quibble is that I wish that Chapter 6 had been as incisively critical as the other chapters, highlighting gaps and contradictions in the discourses of thecosmopolitan minded members of the helping professions that it profiles, as ruthlessly as other chapters expose the muddles of international humanitarian NGOs, national and local governments, bigots, and even refugees themselves Besteman eschews social science jargon to tell her story with great insight and empathy Her book should be required reading for policymakers currently debating what to do with refugees from Syria Nichola van de Walle Foreign Affairs Given Besteman s unique perspective on the Somali Bantu community in Lewiston and her impressive scholarship on refugees, Africa and racism, it would be difficult to imagine any scholar having as rich and multi faceted a frame of reference on the issue of refu Besteman eschews social science jargon to tell her story with great insight and empathy Her book should be required reading for policymakers currently debating what to do with refugees from Syria Nichola van de Walle Foreign Affairs Given Besteman s unique perspective on the Somali Bantu community in Lewiston and her impressive scholarship on refugees, Africa and racism, it would be difficult to imagine any scholar having as rich and multi faceted a frame of reference on the issue of refugees in Maine Besteman s writing offers an in depth and timely analysis of the Somali Bantu experience in Lewiston, now in its second decade Dave Canarie Portland Press Herald Tensions between newcomers and established communities are as old as the US itself, and Making Refuge is a rich account of what is gained and what is lost in becoming American Think of this book as your ringside seat to the birth of a new shared meaning of life the way it should be Faith Nibbs Times Higher Education .Read Epub ♱ Making Refuge: Somali Bantu Refugees and Lewiston, Maine ⚔ How do people whose entire way of life has been destroyed and who witnessed horrible abuses against loved ones construct a new future How do people who have survived the ravages of war and displacement rebuild their lives in a new country when their world has totally changed In Making Refuge Catherine Besteman follows the trajectory of Somali Bantus from their homes in Somalia before the onset inof Somalia s civil war, to their displacement to Kenyan refugee camps, to their relocation in cities across the United States, to their settlement in the struggling former mill town of Lewiston, Maine Tracking their experiences as secondary migrants who grapple with the struggles of xenophobia, neoliberalism, and grief, Besteman asks what humanitarianism feels like to those who are its objects and what happens when refugees move in next door As Lewiston s refugees and locals negotiate coresidence and find that assimilation goes both ways, their story demonstrates the efforts of diverse people to find ways to live together and create community Besteman s account illuminates the contemporary debates about economic and moral responsibility, security, and community that immigration provokes Made it to about 76 pages in.and then somehow went weeks without picking it up again I just got distracted by shinier books, I guess The type size seemed a bit small and close together in this one, with narrow margins and lots of difficult to me names of people and places, so it wasn t as easy to read as the other books on my TBR pile that were beckoning to me.I do still want to read this eventually, as the situation with the Somali immigrants in Lewiston is fascinating to me.