#Download E-pub à Journey to the Stone Country õ eBook or E-pub free

Annabelle Beck is a 42 year old academic living a comfortable, intellectual lifestyle in Melbourne with her husband, Steven She returns home to an empty house a note on the hallstand from Steven confirms her abandonment due to his fleeting infatuation with an honours student.Annabelle feels betrayed and discarded, and contacts an old colleague, Susan Susan arranges a flight to Townsville and takes Annabelle with her on a cultural survey project One of the people involved in the project is Bo Annabelle Beck is a 42 year old academic living a comfortable, intellectual lifestyle in Melbourne with her husband, Steven She returns home to an empty house a note on the hallstand from Steven confirms her abandonment due to his fleeting infatuation with an honours student.Annabelle feels betrayed and discarded, and contacts an old colleague, Susan Susan arranges a flight to Townsville and takes Annabelle with her on a cultural survey project One of the people involved in the project is Bo Rennie, a local Aborigine who grew up in the same area as Annabelle There is an immediate connection between the cultured academic and the knowledgeable ringer.The cattle property Annabelle grew up on was sold decades before, and after the survey project ends she finds temporary solace in staying in her deceased parents home in Townsville Bo pays a visit and they are thrown together again to do a survey project near an old property in the district owned by the pioneering Bigge family.For Bo there is a strong ancestral pull of the country in this place Annabelle uses her archaeological skills to gain a better understanding of what life would have been like for the Bigges on their abandoned property She spends time in the old library, classic books turning back to the earth courtesy of the termites The Bigges had been wealthy and had travelled overland forthan a year with all their possessions including a piano to mark out their place in this isolated location.The presence of Steven lurks in the background like an annoying mosquito Annabelle has barely left town when he is trying to track her down it didn t work out with the honours student Steven is 50 and appears to be full of complex self justification arguments Meanwhile, the connection between Annabelle and Bo deepens and they start to sleep together.In their travels they come across a number of people and families, black and white, and the nature of their growing relationship is understood at times before they seem to realise what is going on Arner and Trace, Bo s nephew and niece, join them although Trace fades out of the picture after becoming involved with Matthew Hearn, a young man on a station near the Bigge property, Ranna Station Arner is described as a large young man, perhaps morbidly obese, who says virtually nothing and is thought to be gifted in his understanding and importance to his people This is difficult to gauge through his limited dialogue the Pajero that Bo and Annabelle travel around in seems to haveof a personality Arner is aloof, almost somnambulistic, spending as much time as possible in the truck cabin listening to an endless soundtrack of loud and angry hip hop music If he is the great hope of the next generation, here s hoping he wakes up soon.The entwinement of Annabelle and Bo extends to their families, and towards the end of the book there is a confrontation of sorts with an elder, Panya Panya lives in a neglected and ramshackle house, enthroned on a broken sofa with a bucket full of excrement beside her She spills forth a history of the families, of how Annabelle s grandfather, Beck, was in a group of men that chased down people from her tribe, killing the men, women and children She was a child at the time, saved by Bo s grandmother by hiding in the skin of an old bull, looking out to see Beck kill her brother with his stirrup.The landscape plays an integral role in the novel, and Bo s understanding of it is frequently expressed not just in word but in gestures The novel also covers the challenge of returning to place that you once knew well, but now don t remember or understand at all.I thought there was too much waffle and found the dialogue at times between Annabelle and Bo didn t ring true Paragraphs and paragraphs of dialogue I get it already This is one of my all time favourite books Gently weaving through the minefield that is associated with this issue, it allowed me a deeper understanding of place and connection to country I later heard Alex Miller talk about this book and he said it is based on a true storywhich made me love it evenOh and Alex Miller is a gem. #Download E-pub ⚝ Journey to the Stone Country é Betrayed by her husband, Annabelle Beck retreats from Melbourne to her old family home in tropical North Queensland where she meets Bo Rennie, one of the Jangga tribe Intrigued by Bo s claim that he holds the key to her future, Annabelle sets out with him on a path of recovery that leads back to her childhood and into the Jangga s ancient heartland, where their grandparents s lives begin to yield secrets that will challenge the possibility of their happiness together With the consummate artistry of a novelist working at the height of his powers, Miller convinces us that the stone country is not only a remote and exotic location in North Queensland, but is also an unvisited place within each of us Journey to the Stone Country confirms Miller s reputation as one of Australia s most intelligent and uncompromising writers The most impressive and satisfying novel of recent years It gave me all the kinds of pleasure a reader can hope for Tim Winton A terrific tale of love and redemption that captivates from the first line Nicholas Shakespeare Miller s fiction has a mystifying power that is always far than the sum of its partshis footsteps softly, deftly, steadily take you places you may not have been, and their sound resonates for a long time Andrea Stretton, Sydney Morning HeraldFirst Paragraph The moment she opened the front door and stepped into the passage she knew he was gone She stood in the silence, her heavy briefcase hanging from her hand, staring at her reflection in the bevelled mirrorglass on the hallstand The passage smelled of fish from next door s cooking It was raining again and the tyres going past in the road outside were making a swishing sound A week earlier they had celebrated her forty second birthday together at her favorite Italian restaurant in Carlton That evening with their meal they shared a bottle of wine and then went home and made love After making love she slept soundly and woke next morning refreshed That day, which was a Saturday, they began planning a trip to Europe, to be undertaken in the autumn There were conferences they would each attend, hers at Kent on Globalising History and his at Leeds on Biography as Fiction After her conference she was to look up family connections in Somerset and they would then meet in Frankfurt and spend a week there together with his brother s family before flying home At a pace quick enough to pass a lizard lying flat out but slow enough to drink a daiquiri Mr Miller trawls through the stone country of Queensland, Australia with a satisfying and intimate tale Nothing much resembling a plot Characters a plenty Images of a countryside you want to go stand and stare at.I m still not sure what I was so drawn to in this novel but it fair sucked me in.Maybe as a pink Australian living in a city it was the intimacy with the outback land and the locals that had At a pace quick enough to pass a lizard lying flat out but slow enough to drink a daiquiri Mr Miller trawls through the stone country of Queensland, Australia with a satisfying and intimate tale Nothing much resembling a plot Characters a plenty Images of a countryside you want to go stand and stare at.I m still not sure what I was so drawn to in this novel but it fair sucked me in.Maybe as a pink Australian living in a city it was the intimacy with the outback land and the locals that had me mesmerised Through very clever subtlety of language and imagery I also learnt though not in any way didactically a littleof how this land looks through the Aboriginal lens.If you re from this part of the world, it will feel like home and to the rest of us it feels like we ve really, intimately, missed out on knowing anything at all I read this slowly, partly to process the beautiful descriptions of the Australian landscape, but also because the story was really way too slow If the story had beenengaging this would have been a gorgeous book. A fascinating work A lot of reviews are negative about it but I think they miss the point there is a monotony and rhythm to life in inland Queensland that Miller has captured well It s a feeling that might be familiar to those involved in agriculture or land custodianship across Australia and the world All readers should be warned that this is actually a philosophical novel hidden within a romance novel The philosophical part slowly sheds it s romance skin throughout the narrative until the A fascinating work A lot of reviews are negative about it but I think they miss the point there is a monotony and rhythm to life in inland Queensland that Miller has captured well It s a feeling that might be familiar to those involved in agriculture or land custodianship across Australia and the world All readers should be warned that this is actually a philosophical novel hidden within a romance novel The philosophical part slowly sheds it s romance skin throughout the narrative until the end when all romantic pretence is gone For lack of a better description Miller is an inverse Nicholas Sparks.When confronting Aboriginal ideas and culture it s extremely important to consider time and what it means to a true custodian The longest continuously extant culture in the world deals with time on a scale that is hard to describe to those that don t understand their way of life It s something that you can feel Bo Rennie wrestling with throughout the book He s a man of both worlds, he knows how to work the land as cattle country to survive in a European dominant society but he s also been educated in the traditional ways too The power of Bo s father and his natural talent of corralling stock shows the non violent path that can merge those two paths Bo has been struggling to replicate that his whole life What makes it even harder is that his father s path resulted in him being broken by a system that better suits titles and deeds liars and cheats The silence that pervades his father s life and his time with Dougald is one way to deal with reconciliation and the life of a drover but it doesn t sit well with Bo His Grandmother was also broken by that system and she eventhan his father seemingly managed to integrate and thrive in the merging of European and Aboriginal culture Bo is trying to revive her way of life.I think it s also crucial to understand that the main character of this novel is actually the land itself The people on it are transitory Just as you can see the stories of all those from the generations before, Aboriginal and white, have turned to dust, you can also see the current generation will be forgotten and erased by the land in time too Miller has similar skills to Cormac McCarthy in his ability to use imagery to tell the story It seems he also believes that humans are image driven in their thoughts It also seems he feels that the issues he is dealing with are in many ways too big for words.The final showdown with Aunty Panya is great because throughout the story Bo Rennie s character has been built up as an Aboriginal man who has adhered to the old ways and understands his role as custodian of the land but also understands the way to make it work with Western influence Not bowing down to the white people but continuing his purpose using their tools Then you see all of this ripped apart like a thin film of tissue paper as Aunty Panya tells him he doesn t know anything, doesn t understand at all, and even worse has been fraternising with the enemy The whole structure of his character collapses It is a truly hopeless feeling.All this time you ve had the presence of Arner sitting there as a witness, a man who seems in many ways unshackled from time and the events happening around him It s seemingly another path that one could take Bo is trying to preserve his way of life and what he believes is right for his people, Les Marra thinks he s going to create a new future for his people by building a dam and submerging Bo s country and many people agree with him, Aunty Panya cares only for the past, Annabelle is lost in the space between her own incomplete memories and her foggy future, Trace and Matthew will forge ahead for love, all of them believing their way is the right way Through all of this Arner sits and observes He bears witness The mysterious stone is something many found frustrating but it s quite important because it demonstrates the true destruction wrought on Aboriginal culture by the Europeans There is lost knowledge that has been stolen from them and they will never get back Miller uses a very delicate touch to compare this complete annihilation of an oral tradition to the way the termites have turned the books to dust in the Ranna household The way Annabelle reacts to the books shows how her upbringing has made her value the wrong things The irony that the preservation of the Ranna station might prevent the dam where millennia of Aboriginal history couldn t is one of thepoignant points in the novel Only at the very end of the novel does Annabelle realise that the hollowing out of the Aboriginal custodianship of the land through European influence is so many magnitudes deeper than the termite ridden books that it drives her to a deep despair It is the part of the book that I wrestled with the most The existential despair of what happened, how to carry on in the face of it, and what the path forward could possibly be.Annabelle Beck is really only there as a plot device The story is supposed to be hers but frankly she s completely auxiliary It s almost as if Miller felt uncomfortable writing about exclusively Aboriginal characters and therefore put Annabelle in to make the bookappropriate coming from a white writer She s his gateway into a world that s not his Even though she s the protagonist, she becomes irrelevant because her claim to the land is fleeting compared to the indigenous millennias long guardianship over it Her marriage break up becomes so trivial that it s forgotten The revelation that her grandfather massacred Bo s ancestors essentially wipes the relevance of everything else in her life away That horrible secret can never be expunged and it certainly leaves the reader feeling nothing but despair at the end of the novel Bo seems determined to make everything work but it just doesn t feel like it ever could It s hard to know what to think in the face of this revelation, even though you could feel it coming It s a feeling that will be familiar to people around the world, how we deal with the guilt of our ancestors actions We are not them but we have been shaped by them and their actions.It s an exceptionally grim ending and I can understand why many would be disappointed having slogged there along such a slow meandering path If you were left annoyed by the lack of resolution for Annabelle then I think this book wasn t for you Unfortunately you won t know that until you hit the last sentence on the last page Another magnificent offering from Miller I could tell it was his earlier work, somehow not as sophisticated as his latest offering, Passage of Love , but something different and just as worthwhile is being offered here The transcendence of racial differences and reaching a point of peace and acceptance in empathy Well written loved the evocative descriptions of the Australian landscape throughout. After a great start, I nearly gave up on this book about half way through I loved Miller s Coal Creek the only one of his I d previously read but was finding this uninvolving and difficult to pick up once I d put it down Mainly because I just could not believe in the relationship between Annabelle and Bo Annabelle, an intellectual, educated academic, accustomed to Melbourne s sophisticated food and culture, riding into the sunset with Bo Really A man who chain smokes so badly that the o After a great start, I nearly gave up on this book about half way through I loved Miller s Coal Creek the only one of his I d previously read but was finding this uninvolving and difficult to pick up once I d put it down Mainly because I just could not believe in the relationship between Annabelle and Bo Annabelle, an intellectual, educated academic, accustomed to Melbourne s sophisticated food and culture, riding into the sunset with Bo Really A man who chain smokes so badly that the only time he d ever be breathing clean air is when he s asleep A man with disgusting habits like hawking and spitting, and sticking his stinking half smoked cigarettes to tables or dashboards with a glob of saliva A man who eats solely red and processed meats, butter and white bread the closest thing to a vegetable he ever consumes is tomato sauce If she stays with him, she ll be pretty soon abandoning their precious Verbena Station to nurse him through lung cancer, heart disease or bowel cancer, perhaps all three at once Run away, Annabellebeck However, despite the stomach turning hero , I did stick with this book and loved many parts of it Miller is supreme in his evocation of the Australian bush, its gaunt and sparse beauty, and in descriptions of its criminal, ongoing rape by European settlers and their descendants The scenes at the abandoned, decaying Ranna Homestead were haunting and beautiful And the end, especially the bitter confrontation with the old Murri woman, Panya, was thought provoking and powerful Where do I begin Since when does a seemingly affluent academic say, Elizabeth and me pp 42 What were the Miles Franklin judges thinking This book is only a little shy of a mills and boon romance, and while they have their place, they don t deserve Miles Franklin awards I agree with other reviewers it is slow Can only guess that the author has a politically correct moral on his her mind Alex Either way, the didacticism becomes evident in the last half of the book, which I get, Where do I begin Since when does a seemingly affluent academic say, Elizabeth and me pp 42 What were the Miles Franklin judges thinking This book is only a little shy of a mills and boon romance, and while they have their place, they don t deserve Miles Franklin awards I agree with other reviewers it is slow Can only guess that the author has a politically correct moral on his her mind Alex Either way, the didacticism becomes evident in the last half of the book, which I get, but it is long winded to say the least And the stone strand is never resolved I hope I have not been asked to base a conclusion about the found, spiritual stone in the hands of a white woman, on the ending It seems that the foreshadowing of the significance of the stone and boy s grandmothers name hinted at in the end, is forgotten Sorry, but I read this for school and won t be teaching it Don t want to give anything away but, as a previous reviewer said, the relationships are quite contrived and lack credibility I d like to know if the author received funding based on the repeated, repeated, repeated sorry mention of the 4wd they used, amongst other brand names mentioned Wouldn t car , 4wd or some other synonym suffice Beyond 4wd, to convey the fact that they needed a vehicle for off road driving, it was so unnecessary I think this is a post post colonial novel or a pseudo post colonial novel ie Anglo trying to represent a colonised ethnic group An aside since when do people eat sausages, steak and bread for every meal Did I miss something As a positive, the author does evocatively create a sense of place I give up I m bored I don t care I m sorry if you love this book, that s great, but it s not for me It might help if I was from Far North Queensland and had some connection to what the author is blathering on about, but it s all flowery crap as far as I m concerned Sorry Australian Literature, once again we find we just can t get along.