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!Download Pdf ⚈ Ilmasota ja kirjallisuus ☼ Toisen maailmansodan aikana liittoutuneet pommittivat ylit saksalaista kaupunkia, monet maan tasalle siviili kuoli, ja seitsem n ja puoli miljoonaa menetti kotinsa Silti Saksan kirjallisuudessa, kansakunnan muistissa, tuhoista on tehokkaasti vaiettu, v itt W G Sebald Kollektiivisesta muistinmenetyksest tyrmistyneen mutta my s lumoutuneena Sebald pohtii, miksi Ilmasota ja kirjallisuus pureutuu Sebaldin tutulla nell syv lle t h n kummalliseen, aavemaiseen hiljaisuuteen You would think the massive air raids on Germany in World War II, the most dramatic experience the German people have ever gone through, would be a subject Germans couldn t stop talking about The exact opposite is the case But why Sebald goes to the bottom of this phenomenon in the four essays that make up this book He comes up with a thorough, convincing and riveting explanation German authors are largely to blame The first essay traces this out The second names a famous German author as You would think the massive air raids on Germany in World War II, the most dramatic experience the German people have ever gone through, would be a subject Germans couldn t stop talking about The exact opposite is the case But why Sebald goes to the bottom of this phenomenon in the four essays that make up this book He comes up with a thorough, convincing and riveting explanation German authors are largely to blame The first essay traces this out The second names a famous German author as an example of this The third essay discusses a German author who resisted this trend The fourth essay recaps these ideas in a discussion of the artist Peter Weiss Readers see how Germany s authors glazed over not just the experience of the air raids, but the experience of the years leading up to them.Along the way Sebald calls into question not only authors, but the accounts of ordinary Germans as well For example, letters written at the time show no syntactical problems describing the attacks That is, in their clich d and vacuous accounts, people learned to describe the attacks without ever touching the experience of being bombed I m curious how the German accounts of air attacks compare to the British ones of the Blitz But that s another essay German authors, for their part, had careers to build, and the realism of the actual experience gave way to the authorial quest for coolby invoking pseudo humanist and Far Eastern philosophical notions, with a great deal of Symbolist jargon to make the real horrors of the time disappear through the artifice of abstraction and metaphysical fraudulence as if to enlighten those who barely escaped about the presumed metaphysical meaning of their experience About Germany s writers the author is equally to the pointWhen a morally compromised author claims the field of aesthetics as a value free area it should make his readers stop and think This caution should serve for all readers Sebald points out that such literary stylization tends to create a complicity between reader and author Do modern authors similarly mask our current problems This is thought provoking.I give the book only four stars in part because I wasn t familiar with the authors Sebald criticizes mea culpa and also because, for once, I think an author didn t say quite enough A concluding essay would have gone down well with me One thing Sebald does particularly well is to give readers a clue as to the really great German books and authors they ought to look into Start with this one On the Nautral History of Destruction is top notch, and I strongly recommend it This posthumous collection is a curious mixture The bulk of the book consists of an adapted lecture series on the bombing of German cities, the unprecedented nature of the destruction in cities such as Hamburg and the curious lack of references to it in most German post war literature This is powerful, moving and thought provoking The remainder of the book is a series of essays on three German writers, none of whom I knew anything about, and although this was interesting in what it said about This posthumous collection is a curious mixture The bulk of the book consists of an adapted lecture series on the bombing of German cities, the unprecedented nature of the destruction in cities such as Hamburg and the curious lack of references to it in most German post war literature This is powerful, moving and thought provoking The remainder of the book is a series of essays on three German writers, none of whom I knew anything about, and although this was interesting in what it said about the culture of the time, it would not inspire me to read any of these writers The first is Alfred Andersch who seems comically vain and egotistical, the second is Jean Amery, a Jewish survivor of the camps and the third is Peter Weiss, who was also a painter.Sebald was always an intriguing writer, but for the most part I don t think this ranks with his best work This book contains four essays, the final three which I did not read dealing with three writers I do not know Alfred Andersch, Jean Am ry, Peter Weiss The opening essay, which anchors the book and is 48% of the book deals with the interesting topic of the German cultural amnesia regarding the devastation they suffered from the allied bombing of German cities The essay is clear and contains some interesting points Sebald believes that contemporary Germans suffer from a sort of cognitive d This book contains four essays, the final three which I did not read dealing with three writers I do not know Alfred Andersch, Jean Am ry, Peter Weiss The opening essay, which anchors the book and is 48% of the book deals with the interesting topic of the German cultural amnesia regarding the devastation they suffered from the allied bombing of German cities The essay is clear and contains some interesting points Sebald believes that contemporary Germans suffer from a sort of cognitive disconnect that comes from denying the fact of their trauma AND the fact that they themselves quite obviously were the ultimate cause of that trauma For those seeking to understand the strange psychology of the Germans that is on display today in the current crisis, this essay will repay the effort of reading it This posthumous volume of Sebald s non fiction writing is a major contribution to German literary criticism and politico cultural analysis Accompanying his reflections on the traumatic impact of the air war against German cities are essays studying the very diverse reactions of three witnesses of that time as reflected in their post war literary works In AIR WAR AND LITERATURE, originally presented as the Zurich Lectures, Sebald delves deeply into some very uncomfortable questions The air w This posthumous volume of Sebald s non fiction writing is a major contribution to German literary criticism and politico cultural analysis Accompanying his reflections on the traumatic impact of the air war against German cities are essays studying the very diverse reactions of three witnesses of that time as reflected in their post war literary works In AIR WAR AND LITERATURE, originally presented as the Zurich Lectures, Sebald delves deeply into some very uncomfortable questions The air war on 131 German cities killed some six hundred thousand civilians and destroyedthan the homes of seven and a half million people Why have these events resulted mostly in public silence for decades Why have so few literary works attempted to speak to the traumatic impact on the population Most Germans seem to have tried to come to terms with the realities of the war years by suppressing their immediate pain and the longer term suffering Sebald has thoroughly researched a multitude of authors, both in fiction and non fiction Yet, he deems their explanations unsatisfactory Heinrich Boell is cited as one of the early exceptions, yet publication of his book, The Silent Angel, was delayed by forty years.Sebald contemplates the different causes for this persistent silence For example, basing himself on a range of contemporary sources, he confronts the reader with a detailed description of the Hamburg firestorm As disturbing as his account is, Sebald s reflective style makes it readable His objective reporting neither criticises the Allies campaign nor does he apologise for German actions leading to the war He wonders, though, whether the depth of the traumatic experiences of this and other air attacks may have left many people numb and dazed, unable to express their reactions for a long time The account of a young mother wandering through the station confused and stunned is one of several examples Her suitcase suddenly opens onto the platform revealing the charcoaled remains of her baby.Sebald s intent is not to shock but to explain the deep sense of loss that must have been felt by people like her He further contends that at that time in the war, the growing acceptance of guilt for the Nazi s atrocities led in many civilians to an acknowledgment of justified punishment by the Allied forces Last, not least, after the war many Germans experienced a lifting of a heavy burden that they felt they had lived under during the Nazi regime Concentrating on building the new Germany focused their minds on a better future The publication in German of his Lectures in 1997 resulted in a range of reactions from readers He reflects their varied views and comments in a postscript, thereby adding a fascinating 1990 s dimension to his rough and ready collection of various observations, materials, and theses.The three authors who are the subject of the essays in this volume may be better known to students of German literature and culture They represent a fine example of Sebald s skill as a contemplative and sensitive literary critic At the same time, these essays complement Sebald s Lectures in afundamental way In terms of coming to terms with the Nazi period and its atrocities, each one represents a specific type of German with his own means and ways of dealing with the recent past Alfred Andersch is presented as having reinterpreted his personal history to fit his vision of self importance in post war Germany Jean Amery, of half Jewish parentage, suffered through SS torture and survived various concentration camps For the rest of his life, which he ended himself, he did not lose the nightmares of his torment It was not until the mid sixties, that he found his voice to impart his experiences in the form of essays on exile, genocide and resistance Peter Weiss, who had lived in exile most of his life, found his self expression mainly through painting and theatre productions until he published late in life his major fiction work, Aesthetics of Resistance.This collection of mediations on natural guilt, national victimhood, and the universal consequences of denying the past is a significant socio political document Its importance for today s reader goes beyond the concrete German situation As it addressesfundamental issues of dealing with a society s traumatic past experiences, Sebald also confronts the need to develop the capacity to heal while learning and sharing the lessons from that past Had this been reviewedfairly by my fellow Goodreaders, I probably would have gone up to 3 stars, but instead I find myself thrown into a position of aggression Had this been written by, e.g., Peter Weiss, not only would it not have x hundred ratings it wouldn t even have been published Thankfully for lovers of mildly diverting amateur history and effective literary polemic i.e., probably not you , it was written by Sebald, and so is not only published, but published in cheap paper back Had this been reviewedfairly by my fellow Goodreaders, I probably would have gone up to 3 stars, but instead I find myself thrown into a position of aggression Had this been written by, e.g., Peter Weiss, not only would it not have x hundred ratings it wouldn t even have been published Thankfully for lovers of mildly diverting amateur history and effective literary polemic i.e., probably not you , it was written by Sebald, and so is not only published, but published in cheap paper back by a major publishing house Meanwhile, one third of Peter Weiss s Aesthetics of Resistance, which Sebald praises effusively in the last essay here, has been published by a small university press So it goes The main attraction of this volume is a pair of lectures Sebald gave on the German people s supposed failure to remember and therefore work through the horrific destruction of that country s cities at the end of the second world war a destruction that will be familiar to anyone interested in now slightly out of favor novels like Slaughterhouse 5 Sebald argument flits back and forth between a number of similar but not identical claims i Germans have repressed the destruction of, e.g., Hamburg, and do not remember it at all This has the virtues of appealing to what I am told are Sebald s main themes, memory and forgetting I confess, these are not my favorite themes, but I am saved here because statement i is blatantly untrue Sebald modifies it, without too much silliness, toii German writers have repressed the destruction of, e.g., Hamburg, and do not write about it at all This, too, is untrue, as Sebald admits, and oncealters his statement toiii German writers have not repressed the destruction of, e.g., Hamburg, but they have not written about it in a way that satisfies me, W G Sebald that is, they have not written extremely plain descriptions of objects like burnt human limbs Please note that Sebald was an infant while the bombing was going on, so he certainly doesn t and can t remember the destruction This is really where the argument comes to rest nobody has written a book about the destruction of the German cities, to which Sebald could, in good conscience, have given five stars on goodreads That is not much of an argument The insights it gives into Sebald s aesthetic preferences do not endear him to me, either, since his suggestion is that any artistic representation of this destruction is morally bankrupt, and what is needed is,or less, the straight facts ma am Perhaps among German authors this could seem like a radical statement To those of us used to Anglo American plainness, unfortunately, it sounds like a plea for yetlower journalism There are some nice things at the start and end of this volume The two lectures are nicely written, and the essay on Peter Weiss aforementioned may, I hope, spur publication of Aesthetics of Resistance s second and third thirds I hope this in part because the essay on Jean Amery was probably behind the recent translation of the work discussed here, on the air war The first lit crit essay is a polemic against Alfred Andersch, a writer I d never heard of, and thanks to Sebald s entirely convincing essay, will probably never read Of course, that would have been the case without Sebald s essay The dark core of the book is Sebald s addendum to his lectures starting on page 69 I suspect that this is the most Sebaldian part of the book it flits around the author s uninteresting personal experiences, and the fragments seem, to me at least, to add up to nothing Unlike the lectures, it is not well written and or well translated rather, it is filled with sentences like The material in the passages above indicates that attitudes to the realities of a time when urban life in Germany was almost entirely destroyed have been extremely erratic, 91 That might well be very clear in German, but in English it is rebarbatively abstract Someone I trust almost entirely tells me that Rings of Saturn is the place to start, and I will give it a shot But after the disaster of Austerlitz and the feel good pseudo criticism of On NHD aren t you glad that you are not guilty of the great sins of not remembering things Sebald says are important, or of writing books Sebald doesn t like , my patience with W G won t hold much longer There s an interesting, though academic, article to be written comparing Adorno s reaction to the war and the art that comes after it, and Sebald s reaction here Adorno would argue that this just the facts is a mirror of the oppressive world that led to the war Sebald would argue that modernist formalist is an immoral distortion of people s actual suffering Note that for Adorno the problem is social , and focused on justice for Sebald the problem is individualistic and focused on personal morality This might explain my distaste for what I ve read of WGS so far I was wary when I started this I bought this a few weeks ago based on the strength of a recommendation from somebody I normally trust, unaware that it was a series of four lectures And normally that means I ll be bored to tears Bad flashbacks ensued from two semesters of studying German literature, an altogether stultifying experience thanks to the toothless and ossified lecturers at my university The first lecture, on collective memory regarding the air raids and aftermath, takes about 5 I was wary when I started this I bought this a few weeks ago based on the strength of a recommendation from somebody I normally trust, unaware that it was a series of four lectures And normally that means I ll be bored to tears Bad flashbacks ensued from two semesters of studying German literature, an altogether stultifying experience thanks to the toothless and ossified lecturers at my university The first lecture, on collective memory regarding the air raids and aftermath, takes about 50% of the book and is a five star read all the quotes I typed up are from there The clarity and restraint of the prose is awe inspiring Writing like that about something like that is a Herculean achievement.The next two lectures deal with individual German authors that I d heard about, Alfred Andersch being drawn as a self important ass who re edited his past in a manner that makes you cringe first divorcing his Jewish wife to gain access to the Nazi run Writer s Association a prerequisite to getting published then claiming her as his wife when it was expedient in American captivity, though calling her a half Jewish mongrel The next lecture deals with Amery, a survivor of the Nazi terror, adding a very impressive study to my previous knowledge of Primo Levi s account.I did not care for the last lecture, on Peter Weiss It just didn t quite hang together for me and I thought the analysis was the weakest, so a bit of a downer to end the book on I understand why he was included, as Weiss laboured under being both Jewish and German, so he fits into the larger context, but I enjoyed the other parts of the book a great deal.Above all, the sources he cited triggered my historian packrat reflex and drove me back to buy further books On the Natural History of Destruction is perhaps the the work of Sebald s that I ve enjoyed the least thusfar This means it was still fucking transcendent.The reason I didn t enjoy it as much is a fairly simple one I just haven t read most of the authors he references in his long essays about, among Peter Weiss, Alfred Andersch, or the various Tr mmerlitteratur authors I did enjoy the essay on Jean Am ry it s a wonderful meditation on an author, who, like Sebald, embodies the spirit of int On the Natural History of Destruction is perhaps the the work of Sebald s that I ve enjoyed the least thusfar This means it was still fucking transcendent.The reason I didn t enjoy it as much is a fairly simple one I just haven t read most of the authors he references in his long essays about, among Peter Weiss, Alfred Andersch, or the various Tr mmerlitteratur authors I did enjoy the essay on Jean Am ry it s a wonderful meditation on an author, who, like Sebald, embodies the spirit of international postwar literature.The parts that weren t arguments about authors I hadn t read were beautiful, beautiful, beautiful Like most Americans, I had no idea just how destroyed Germany was I knew about the carpet bombings of Berlin, Dresden, etc., but I didn t know how many people they d directly killed and how much additional misery they caused This, of course, speaks to his argument that the destruction of Germany has been erased from cultural memory both inside and outside the country His arguments are persuasive, gorgeously written, and filled with grisly detail Besides the essay on area bombing, of which I was interested and which was the main reason for me purchasing this book, I was very pleasantly surprised by a review of Jean Avery s work, which I can t wait to read now Beautifully written on the part of Sebald and with such consideration towards victims, such strong belief that we must understand both the perpetrator and the victim in any criminal process such as the WWII genocide was To hear of mothers who pack their burned and mummified chil Besides the essay on area bombing, of which I was interested and which was the main reason for me purchasing this book, I was very pleasantly surprised by a review of Jean Avery s work, which I can t wait to read now Beautifully written on the part of Sebald and with such consideration towards victims, such strong belief that we must understand both the perpetrator and the victim in any criminal process such as the WWII genocide was To hear of mothers who pack their burned and mummified children in suitcases after escaping from German cities that were flattened out by the British and American bombers, is to hear the side of the story very rarely told the double victims of the Second World War, the citizens of a country run by a raging lunatic who had to suffer at the hands of his and his friends insanity, while at the same time being bombed for intimidation purposes by the Allies It s a loss loss situation, and when speaking and writing of Nazi Germany, a lot of people forget that This book was loaned me by a friendly coworker It was the first explicit account I d ever read of the allied bombing of Germany during World War II Since then I ve followed up with further studies of allied bombing strategies against the Germans and Japanese, their intentions and their actual accomplishments.In addition to describing the devastation imposed upon urban centers, the author meditates upon the subsequent virtual silence of most German speaking writers as regards these events.