@Free Book ⛅ How to Read a Novel ⚨ eBook or E-pub free

A breezy turn about the literary manor, with choice glimpses of the common muck beyond the walls It s hard not to enjoy a book written by someone so clearly enamoured with books and reading, though he is far too caught up in the catty, rarified world of letters to properly connect with the average reader i.e me. I d thought this book to be an exploration of the innards of a novel plot, structure, etc which it s not But I found it no less enjoyable for being instead an extended love letter to the form, with such discourses as the history of the novel, the use of genres, critical receptions, celebrity authors, the hidden secrets to be gleaned from the copyright page, what to think of film adaptations or book reviews or bestseller lists, and a hell of a lotSome of these subjects are just 3 or 4 I d thought this book to be an exploration of the innards of a novel plot, structure, etc which it s not But I found it no less enjoyable for being instead an extended love letter to the form, with such discourses as the history of the novel, the use of genres, critical receptions, celebrity authors, the hidden secrets to be gleaned from the copyright page, what to think of film adaptations or book reviews or bestseller lists, and a hell of a lotSome of these subjects are just 3 or 4 pages in length some of them come closer to a dozen It s light and breezy and for any bibliophile, at least fun and fascinating to boot @Free Book Å How to Read a Novel Ä Do we still know how to read a novel John Sutherland, Chairman of theBooker Prize Committee, asks His disheartened answer is an unequivocal, No But Sutherland has not given up hope With acerbic wit and intellect, he traces the history of what it used to mean to be well read and tells readers what it still means today Using this delightful book as a means to an end, he reminds readers how the delicate charms of fiction can be at once wonderful and inspired and infuriating On one level this is a book about novels how they work, what they re about, what makes them good or bad, and how to talk about them At a deeper level, this is a book in which one of the most intimate t te t tes is described one in which a reader meets a novel Will a great love affair begin Will the rendezvous end in disappointment Who can say In order for the relationship to take its appropriate course all the details must be clearly acknowledged and understood for their complexities plot, point of view, character, style, pace, first and last sentences, and even beauty Still, Sutherland knows a true understanding of fiction is than a flirtation with text and style it is a business Taking his readers on a trip to the bookshop, he helps them judge a book by its cover based on design and color, wondering aloud what genre might be best, even going so far as to analyze one of the latest American bestsellers to further help the buying reader choose the novel that is right for him or her In a book that is as wry and humorous as it is learned and opinionated, John Sutherland tells you everything you always wanted to know about how to read fiction better than you do now but, were afraid to ask WOOO I M DONE WITH IT I am so glad that I m done with it You may think I m being a bit dramatic, considering the book s only 250 pages, and I spent two days reading it not even two full days, just free minutes within them , so it s not like it took me a long time But it felt like time was dragging when I was reading it.It s not a bad book, per se It s just totally and utterly useless to any bibliophiles who have spent the better part of their life reading Or anyone who reads and constantly WOOO I M DONE WITH IT I am so glad that I m done with it You may think I m being a bit dramatic, considering the book s only 250 pages, and I spent two days reading it not even two full days, just free minutes within them , so it s not like it took me a long time But it felt like time was dragging when I was reading it.It s not a bad book, per se It s just totally and utterly useless to any bibliophiles who have spent the better part of their life reading Or anyone who reads and constantly evaluates what they re reading, as opposed to reading masses of Harlequin romances, one genre incessantly, or just bestsellers This isa book for a novice, someone just beginning to take reading semi seriously, and wants something that can only be described as a cross between a collection of essays and a narrative to himself the author and not in a good way.John Sutherland was a Prof of English at UCL, and was twice on the Man Booker Prize committee Clearly, he has been a reader most of his life, knows a hell of a lot and wants to somehow impart this with the world The problem is, that s what it reads like someone who has information but is unsure how to bequeath it, and someone who is all too self aware.This book was a total waste of time for me If you re intelligent enough to vary your reading, think for yourself whether you want to read a book instead of being pushed into it by prize winning novels or bestsellers, or if you ve been reading consistently longer than five years, don t bother Trust me, it will only serve to frustrate you I tried, but I could not finish this book It might be great for someone who has literally never read a novel, but for people who love to read, most of his insights are useless For example, did you know that you shouldn t judge the worth of a book based on how many copies it has sold Did you know that at the back of many books, you can find a little paragraph about the font Did you know that you should take reviews of books with a grain of salt Really I had no idea Because this is theI tried, but I could not finish this book It might be great for someone who has literally never read a novel, but for people who love to read, most of his insights are useless For example, did you know that you shouldn t judge the worth of a book based on how many copies it has sold Did you know that at the back of many books, you can find a little paragraph about the font Did you know that you should take reviews of books with a grain of salt Really I had no idea Because this is the first book I ve ever touched.I think one of the reasons I m so disappointed with this book is that I expected it to be a Harold Bloom style book about how to better appreciate fiction Instead, this is a book about everything but the content of a novel I skipped to the end, and the only reason he gives for reading novels is that it might make you a better person Wow Thanks As the title suggests, a thoroughly pretentious, often infuriating, very occasionally interesting exercise by an important critic whose name I d never heard of Sutherland s prose flies by the only reason I finished the thing , and he does manage to provide some solid information on the history of the novel though nothing that you wouldn t have learned in any decent Literature 101 class When discussing modern literature, his examples rely heavily and predictably on nominees and laureates of t As the title suggests, a thoroughly pretentious, often infuriating, very occasionally interesting exercise by an important critic whose name I d never heard of Sutherland s prose flies by the only reason I finished the thing , and he does manage to provide some solid information on the history of the novel though nothing that you wouldn t have learned in any decent Literature 101 class When discussing modern literature, his examples rely heavily and predictably on nominees and laureates of the Man Booker prize not incidentally, an award whose committee he has chaired Perhaps some would find it useful it certainly reminded me of a few things I had forgotten from a certain freshman year seminar but I find myself wishing that I had my four and a half hours back A slightly misleading title ironic the back cover says the book will help us recognize a misleading title at first glance This is not one of those Harold Bloom or James Woods how fiction works type books It s casual and chatty it discusses publishing, dust covers, fonts and margins, author photographs, book reviews, awards the author served on the Man Booker jury , whether Martians will understand Pride and Prejudice, whether John Banville understood Ian McEwan s Saturday, whether A slightly misleading title ironic the back cover says the book will help us recognize a misleading title at first glance This is not one of those Harold Bloom or James Woods how fiction works type books It s casual and chatty it discusses publishing, dust covers, fonts and margins, author photographs, book reviews, awards the author served on the Man Booker jury , whether Martians will understand Pride and Prejudice, whether John Banville understood Ian McEwan s Saturday, whether Bret Easton Ellis is telling the truth, whether we should buy hardbacks or paperbacks After I d gotten through the brief, stupid sections discussing e books, Bill Gates, and Tarantino s Pulp Fiction, it became an enjoyable read I like John Sutherland s style, his wit, and his choice of reading While much of this book contained information that was not new to me, there were bits of wisdom about reading novels within every chapter that made the book worthwhile Anyone who rates Raymond Chandler above John Steinbeck is okay in my book This is a book for readers who relish the book as well as the reading of the book If you are interested in an overview of the novel and reading along with wry and witty comments on the pu I like John Sutherland s style, his wit, and his choice of reading While much of this book contained information that was not new to me, there were bits of wisdom about reading novels within every chapter that made the book worthwhile Anyone who rates Raymond Chandler above John Steinbeck is okay in my book This is a book for readers who relish the book as well as the reading of the book If you are interested in an overview of the novel and reading along with wry and witty comments on the publishing trade this book is for you Like many Goodreads descriptions, the one above simply reproduces the glowing jacket copy That needs to be taken with a grain or a block of salt When I told my wife and oldest daughter that I d bought a remaindered copy of this book for a dollar, they were both skeptical they felt that since I ve been reading novels for over 50 years, I don t need any instruction in that area As a general principle, I m sure I could benefit frominsight and systematic instruction, never having had Like many Goodreads descriptions, the one above simply reproduces the glowing jacket copy That needs to be taken with a grain or a block of salt When I told my wife and oldest daughter that I d bought a remaindered copy of this book for a dollar, they were both skeptical they felt that since I ve been reading novels for over 50 years, I don t need any instruction in that area As a general principle, I m sure I could benefit frominsight and systematic instruction, never having had much literary training beyond high school and college survey courses But in the concrete case of this particular book, their skepticism proved to be amply justified.Sutherland, a British university don and newspaper columnist who twice chaired the Man Booker Prize England s equivalent of the Pulitzer committee, has clearly read a lot of novels, has opinions about them, and likes voicing his opinions Most Goodreaders can say the same, and most of us enjoy reading others opinions, too But even with a chapter organization that s very logically ordered, in terms of a reader s physical experience of a book, the problem is that Sutherland s opinions and factual information here don t constitute a user s manual for novel owners, nor live up to the advertised goal of really giving any significant practical instruction in how to read one Nor does he give any very systematic practical guidance on how to choose novels to read in the first place, though he gives that topicrhetorical attention than the advertised one gets His observations on both topics are sketchy and general, boil down to glorified common sense whenever they re tangible, and are often annoyingly noncommital For instance, should we pay any attention to reviews Well, yes and no What about best seller lists Uh, maybe there are pros and cons Should I buy hardback or paperback Maybe And so it goes Granted, there are complexities, and tradeoffs involved in all of these questions But Sutherland sometimes creates the impression of being a self appointed guide who s afraid to do any guiding One wonders if the title here was his idea or his publisher s, and if My Random Thoughts About Novels I ve Read wouldn t have been adescriptive one, if less commercially enticing.There are a few pluses here not many , which is why I gave the book a second star and it probably was a gift For a modern academic, Sutherland writes in a reasonably accessible style, clearly meant for general readers he very rarely uses jargon and almost always defines it if he does though I still don t know what GBH stands for His prose style tends to be witty of course, it can also be viewed as snide and snarky, depending on how you feel about his targets which often include Americans in general, for instance He s secure enough in his position to take a few jabs at political correctness, though he also has plenty of fashionable establishment prejudices Unlike most modern pundits, he recognizes the enduring value of paper books and their intrinsic advantages over e books, and is optimistic about their survival and he doesn t share the cultural elite s total prejudice against popular and genre fiction, though the vast majority of modern novels that he discusses here are of the self styled literary sort Finally, in places, his content can be anywhere from moderately to very interesting I did pick up a certain amount of worthwhile information here about the history of the book, the world of fiction and the current literary scene.However, there are also significant flaws, even besides the basic one noted above His topically arranged chapters are too short to dothan skim the surface of each of their topics, not to treat it in full For instance, yes, knowing something of the history of the novel is useful background for reading one but Fiction a four minute history is too sketchy to help anybody As he noted, modern publishers do use sex as a blatant advertising tool, but though he didn t put a bikini clad beauty on the cover, he tends to resort to something similar in choosing examples to illustrate his various points, he has a marked tendency to go for the most salacious ones he can find, and that gets old quickly More importantly, he makes some significant factual errors that I could catch in his discussion of some novels which makes me wonder how many there are I didn t catch because I wasn t familiar with the book in question.In summary, reading this book for me was something like kicking back and talking about novels with an opinionated friend except that I get the distinct impression that I m not the sort of person he d enjoy kicking back with or reading the reviews and comments of a fellow Goodreader whom you know is very smart and well spoken, but who doesn t have very similar tastes If you read it, you might often be entertained, sometimes intellectually stimulated to agree or disagree with a thought, sometimes educated with a factoid or anecdote, and at times bored out of your skull But what you will NOT do is learn how to read a novel I love books about books books telling you what to read, how to read, when to read, why to read, etc If you don t, this is likely not your book If you do, it s right up your alley This is a fun, tidbit packed look at the modern novel With a wry, humorous, and decidedly British voice, the author discusses the novel s history, form, and components, all with an eye toward helping the reader bring a bitcontext to his her reading Each chapter is a self contained essay and reads very well I love books about books books telling you what to read, how to read, when to read, why to read, etc If you don t, this is likely not your book If you do, it s right up your alley This is a fun, tidbit packed look at the modern novel With a wry, humorous, and decidedly British voice, the author discusses the novel s history, form, and components, all with an eye toward helping the reader bring a bitcontext to his her reading Each chapter is a self contained essay and reads very well alone The author lards each essay with such a variety of current event and historical factoids that beg to be read aloud at the luch table causing my husband,than once, to shout how is this book organized