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If you re into stuff like this, you can read the full review.Double Entendres Galore Hopscotch by Julio Cort zar Original Review, 1981 05 15 If you like your novels simple and straightforward, don t read Hopscotch.If you have an allergy to extended brainy digressions and convoluted debates, you better avoid Hopscotch.If you abhor puns, double entendre and wordplay, I most seriously advise you to stay clear of Hopscotch.If you can t stand literary, philosophical, musical and artistic ref If you re into stuff like this, you can read the full review.Double Entendres Galore Hopscotch by Julio Cort zar Original Review, 1981 05 15 If you like your novels simple and straightforward, don t read Hopscotch.If you have an allergy to extended brainy digressions and convoluted debates, you better avoid Hopscotch.If you abhor puns, double entendre and wordplay, I most seriously advise you to stay clear of Hopscotch.If you can t stand literary, philosophical, musical and artistic references cramming your narrative, I sincerely prompt you to veer off taking Hopscotch from the bookseller s shelf.If you like your narrative to be free of phrases, expressions and vocabulary from languages you don t know and don t care for, maybe Hopscotch is not a book for you Julio Cortazar HopscotchDon t read this book For real now, don t Throw it away or, better still, burn it Either you will burn it or it will burn you Seriously, it will tear you open and feast on your guts while all you ll be able to do is look around in over saturated numbness I envy those who weren t moved by it I envy and pity them at the same time, for the same reason I ve felt something they have not.I ve talked before about books that read you as much as you read them, but this is Julio Cortazar HopscotchDon t read this book For real now, don t Throw it away or, better still, burn it Either you will burn it or it will burn you Seriously, it will tear you open and feast on your guts while all you ll be able to do is look around in over saturated numbness I envy those who weren t moved by it I envy and pity them at the same time, for the same reason I ve felt something they have not.I ve talked before about books that read you as much as you read them, but this is a whole other thing It strips you bare and puts you under close examination while holding a mirror in which you cannot help but look Have you ever looked into the mirror while listening to Miles Davis Do that and you ll get the idea somewhat If you ve read it but didn t feel it, I envy and pity your ability to look away If you ve never read it at all, I envy and pity your ignorance Five and zero stars Just like everything that s worth our while will ever be 8 years after i read this book, i finally understand why i didn t like it apparently, this is an either or book , but i read it as an and then book.dr wikipedia claims An author s note suggests that the book would best be read in one of two possible ways, either progressively from chapters 1 to 56 or by hopscotching through the entire set of 155 chapters according to a Table of Instructions designated by the author Cort zar also leaves the reader the option of choosing a unique path th 8 years after i read this book, i finally understand why i didn t like it apparently, this is an either or book , but i read it as an and then book.dr wikipedia claims An author s note suggests that the book would best be read in one of two possible ways, either progressively from chapters 1 to 56 or by hopscotching through the entire set of 155 chapters according to a Table of Instructions designated by the author Cort zar also leaves the reader the option of choosing a unique path through the narrative WHERE WAS THAT AUTHOR S NOTE WHEN I READ THIS BOOK because i read the whole 600 page book front to back the way one does, AND THEN i went back and hopscotched through it, thinking that there would be some secret doorway that opened or something that would illuminate why i was doing this second pass but there s no doorway spoiler alert and i resented that i seemed to be reading the whole fucking book again for no fucking reason, and i was so baffled about why people seemed to value this book so much when, to me, it just seemed like an elaborate nose thumbing time wasting prank and i assumed that people liked it because they were trying to be all douchey elitist and pretending to like something just because it was difficult or challenging or whatever, and they cherished their shiny gold star for enduring the tedium of repetition but it s not difficult it s a playful and lyrical schtick if you only have to read it through once, whichever way you choose but reading it twice, back to back, just with the scenes all shuffled in a different order is not something i recommend because it will just be infuriating and you will howl dude, i KNOW WE JUST COVERED THIS WHY ARE YOU TELLING ME THE SAME SHIT ALL OVER AGAIN, FORGETFUL GRANDPA and afterward, all you will remember is the howling, and not the reading so there that s my explanation discovery psacome to my blog Maga WorldTrying to make a living by breaking through the barrier of language is called art Hopscotch is about a community of such labourers It s not an easy job fighting against language but someone has to do it The life style is necessarily unconventional, but that s an effect not a prior condition The battle with language makes a personthan slightly mad It requires seeing everything as if it were nothing This, of course, is what God does Making everything out of nothing is his sp Maga WorldTrying to make a living by breaking through the barrier of language is called art Hopscotch is about a community of such labourers It s not an easy job fighting against language but someone has to do it The life style is necessarily unconventional, but that s an effect not a prior condition The battle with language makes a personthan slightly mad It requires seeing everything as if it were nothing This, of course, is what God does Making everything out of nothing is his specialit de la maison And every true artist has divine ambitions Artists are essentially Mormons they create their own scriptures and then aspire to the scriptural ideals about becoming god like This is the only real wayTo find out what s behind somethingDefine it yourself.The circularity of language is thecausus belli artists hate the fact that words are defined in terms of other words endlessly So they rebel against it, biting the hands that feeds themAt some given point the callus, the sclerosis, the definition is born black or white, radical or conservative, homo or heterosexual, the San Lorenzo team or the Boca Juniors, meat or vegetables, business or poetry Language is a prison they want to escape.It s not just writers who want to push into that Neverland beyond language Painters, film makers, and musicians have the same obsession They all want to find the new surrealism, the next jazz, that perfect story which undermines all stories or isshocking than anything seen before They won t of course But lost causes have their attractions Failure is a foregone conclusion, and therefore technically impossible This is the consolation of artistry.What really fascinates an artist, and what they find infinitely annoying, is a person who already lives beyond language They are attracted to these people as to strange scientific phenomena But they despise them because they have what the artist wants but cannot value it In Hopscotch La Maga is simultaneously adored and reviled, seduced and marginalised She cannot be taught about art because, were she to learn, she would no longer exist beyond language She would no longer be the work of art the artist craves.For the writerthe great Logos is watchingFor him, words always precede thingswithout the verba there isn t any res La Maga on the other hand ispneuma and not logosShe is pure spirit The writer treatsLife as a commentary of something else we cannot reach, which is there within reach of the leap we will not take La Maga has already leapt Or rather she never really existed in the world of language Although she can use language, she has no delusions about its reality or lack of itF or people like her the mystery begins precisely with the explanationThis is the result of inexpressible personal tragedy.Naturally La Maga, that is to say, Reality, has to be abandoned This is the inevitable fate of the artist as well as reality since La Maga World is fundamentally uninhabitable I have never beenwrong about a novel I was about Hopscotch A baffled first reading took place seven annums past, and a vexed and unfair one star review lingered on my profile for a half that period until three years ago the shame , when I suspected there to beto Cort zar and issued a partial retraction for the slander Recent encounters with Cronopios and Famas and A Manual for Manuel showed me that Cort zar was in fact an essential writer of some magical powers, and a cheap encou I have never beenwrong about a novel I was about Hopscotch A baffled first reading took place seven annums past, and a vexed and unfair one star review lingered on my profile for a half that period until three years ago the shame , when I suspected there to beto Cort zar and issued a partial retraction for the slander Recent encounters with Cronopios and Famas and A Manual for Manuel showed me that Cort zar was in fact an essential writer of some magical powers, and a cheap encounter with this Harvill edition in a Chipping Norton bookshop 2.50 urged me to reappraise this masterpiece And on the second reading sheer bliss as I hopped from chapter to chapter This is a full retraction, and if you will accept my grovelling apology, I would be honoured to receive acceptance into warm impish bosom of the Cort zaristas Rayuela Marelle Hopscotch While reading this dizzy making book the word vertiginous occurs very frequently in the text , a book that requires the reader to hop back and forth between the 155 different sections instead of turning the pages in the usual order, I found myself latching onto certain images in the text as if to steady myself the description of a leaf, for example, or an old umbrella dropping from a height, or stars in the night sky, or revolving Japanese sunshades, or the Rayuela Marelle Hopscotch While reading this dizzy making book the word vertiginous occurs very frequently in the text , a book that requires the reader to hop back and forth between the 155 different sections instead of turning the pages in the usual order, I found myself latching onto certain images in the text as if to steady myself the description of a leaf, for example, or an old umbrella dropping from a height, or stars in the night sky, or revolving Japanese sunshades, or the flight pattern of a fly as it circles a lampshade, or blood spatters on concrete But since the images that attracted my attention see updates often described falling or floating or revolving or spiraling, I felt I was constantly in motion just as my fingers were constantly flicking pages back and forth searching for the next chapter number in the seemingly random sequence recommended at the beginning, while at the same time my mind was swirling with the multitude of ideas tossed back and forth by the characters as they sat around smoke filled midnight rooms listening to jazz improvisations, or wandered the rain soaked streets of Paris in the company of a colorful tramp, or the sun filled streets of Buenos Aires in the company of a circus cat, or played a kind of ultimate hopscotch in the courtyard of a mental asylum where finishing on frame number 8 could equal soaring towards brightness as in the hole at the top of a circus tent, or alternately, could mean diving towards darkness as in disappearing down a plughole or falling down the pit of a lift shaft And although the many movement related images that caught my eye in the text seemed quite random, together they began to build towards a pattern of meaning, and even of prophecy, though I couldn t have known that when I focused on them initially The experience left me identifying a little with Lucia, the character in the text who was something of a blind visionary Lucia is the partner of a character called Horacio he always refers to her in his thoughts as La Sybille at least in the French edition Horacio that name means time keeper spends a lot of time discussing the meaning of life with the Jazz loving group described above je swingue donc je suis Interspersed with the group s discussions are odd passages from a writer called Morelli who seems to be compiling his own hopscotch of a work, a kind of literary compendium that a reader would have to find their own way through according to how affected they are by what they have read At times, it felt as if the story I was reading about Horacio and Lucia was actually Morelli s book but at one point Morelli becomes a character in the main story, and crosses paths with Horacio, quite randomly of course, so I realised we weren t in Morelli s book Randomness is a big theme throughout, needless to say Horacio and Lucia meet by accident too, and then rely on mere chance to continue their relationship, always finding each other in the streets of Paris even when they aren t looking for each other Exception seems to be their rule, especially in the case of Lucia who has the ability to find meaning in thingseasily than do the others in their group, and often concerning matters that her education and background would not have prepared her to understand And just as Lucia is a random finder of odd meanings, a blind visionary as it were, Horacio is a conscious seeker of specific meanings, and thearcane the better j acide donc je suis it seems certain acids have a role in the act of thinking However, for Horacio, the dizzy making hopscotch of his life cette vertigineuse marelle , never seems to let him reach the square where meaning might reside Horacio remains the seeker and can t seem to become the finder though the ultimate absurdity of this wonderfully absurd book is that Horacio did find what he was looking for early in the story but was unable to recognize it If there was a term which meant the opposite of a blind visionary, Horacio would be it I loved that This was a book that appealed greatly to my imagination I might even say I watched itthan I read it, heard itthan I comprehended it, indeed I basically lived inside its pages for 3 weeks It spilled over into my life and my life spilled over into the book so that I found myself dreaming about it during the night and wasn t sure later what had been in the dream and what had been in the text I wish books like this came along oftener They make reading muchthan an eye stroll down a page Je lis donc je suis AAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHH I had to read this for a book club I read about 80 pages of this and threw it across the room Wish I didn t Maybe I could ve gottenfor it when I traded it in pretentiousness wrapped uptight faux beatness What I remember expat intellectuals crying over jazz records having an artistic time in paris Well read guy pines for girl who doesn t catch all his references but, you know, feels things The cover blurb makes it look like it will change your life and then mak AAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHH I had to read this for a book club I read about 80 pages of this and threw it across the room Wish I didn t Maybe I could ve gottenfor it when I traded it in pretentiousness wrapped uptight faux beatness What I remember expat intellectuals crying over jazz records having an artistic time in paris Well read guy pines for girl who doesn t catch all his references but, you know, feels things The cover blurb makes it look like it will change your life and then make sandwiches for you Is this book pretentious or just about pretentiousness I couldn t tell Is either worth reading Here s a link to the Quarterly Conversation review of Hopscotch, it s really a very good review, and does a fine job elucidating this book s qualities and its value in the realm of literature, if I were to write a proper review of the book it would be a shadow plagiarization of this you could go read Jimmy s review, which, as I ve said below, is one of the finest and most fun reviews here on Goodreads do yourselves a favor and get to know Jimmy s wri Here s a link to the Quarterly Conversation review of Hopscotch, it s really a very good review, and does a fine job elucidating this book s qualities and its value in the realm of literature, if I were to write a proper review of the book it would be a shadow plagiarization of this you could go read Jimmy s review, which, as I ve said below, is one of the finest and most fun reviews here on Goodreads do yourselves a favor and get to know Jimmy s writing me, this second go at reading Hopscotch was a wonderful lesson in not trusting my first impressions, which, as we should all begin to realize, are at the very least always revisable as we get closer to a thing or a subject, and are often utterly overturned or reversed, and we are proved not only mistaken in our initial judgment, but sometimes laughably in the wrong altogether Here I was altogether in the wrong when I gave up early on this book a few years ago After finishing this reading, I feel Hopscotch is an essential book there were so many mysteriously beautiful moments, so many freshly sculpted images immune to cliche, so many passages that exhaled great gasps of Life, so much vitality and energy vibrating on each page It enters the pantheon as one of the Great Books of Failure really, all books are failures, but very few books are Great Books of Failure I hopscotched through Hopscotch, meaning, I took Cortazar s recommended leapfrogs through Oliveira s labyrinth Read in this manner, the structure itself is a bliss of fragmented puzzling, where correspondences float beneath seemingly disparate sections, doublings and multiplications of resonances are given voice, illuminations rise like will o the wisps in the dusk of reading, and the mind is kept off kilter and at attention and attuned to receiving many tones at once thus the obsession with jazz, how we listen to a line from Dizzy announce the theme but completely transmuted, later on in the tune, recognizableby a feeling and instinct than explicitly drawn.It is said of Hopscotch that it is a young man s book , I guess meaning that it is one of those books better read early in life, when one isopen to oddities and playful impressionism, elements that read as whimsical or seem to lack the seriousness or gravity expected of maturity I totally disagree, or, I disagree that losing the love of play should be considered a mark of maturity Sure, I wasn t prepared the first go round for the originality of Cortazar s writing, which resists categorization and cliche so strongly it often feels loose improvised , and gives the false impression of not holding its center again, as does great jazz, here I think Ornette Coleman comes to mind as a good analogy, his compositions feel precarious and about to spin to pieces but are pinned by the tightest of tonal structures This book is precisely Janus faced see the quote in the QC review , a forward and backward , upward and outward oriented gaze that seems not attached to a youthful perspective as much as it imparts the wisdom that the secret to timelessness is in keeping young eyes And as a Great Book of Failure, it came to me, 38 years old, at what seems an ideal time an age when it is tempting to ease into habits, narrow our lives, stabilize our personas, stultify and ride inertia out into oblivion Janus faced Hopscotch reminds us to resist this at the very core of our being, that all the paths we take will be equally mistaken we look back and can only decide on whether we have been made crooked or straight nails chapter 41 is of the utmost importance to the book as we know, straight nails have always known their destiny and slide easily into their purpose, while crooked nails must find unique forms to fulfill themselves Hopscotch reminds us of the inevitability, and thus the worth, of our mistaken path, that our failures are our only possible successes, because there only failures, false starts, misdirections, and that the one thing that seems to be consistently true in life is that questions are farvaluable than answers Cortazar not only incorporates these notions into the plot and characterization of Hopscotch, the structure he invented for his book makes it a literal part of the reading experience he has made a labyrinth for us to hold in our hands, live with, carry beside us another labyrinth, of pages and print, to accompany the labyrinth in our skulls.It gets my highest recommendation It is a favorite Play Hopscotch it s a game, it s only meant for play and what is art but the most serious of playtimes all you need is a toe and a pebble and some chalk and little square opening up to Heaven It s simple Below is some extraneous crap better avoided, but it got some licks so, like, whatever Mais une autre UPDATE Below is some dumb shit I wrote a long time ago, that somehow 21 people liked or licked , not sure about that I lick things I like all the time, how about you sometimes licking leads to liking and vice versa about this book Hopscotch which I never really gave a proper chance and which I am jumping into again Let s say I m jumping aboard, to counteract the update below Any case, I ain t no Real Good Art Critic heaven forbid actually, I have learned to not trust my instincts, to play with opposite inclinations, and to sink slowly with a lascivious enjoyment in the warm bath of the oh so many times I have erred To err is human, to lick divine So in the service of divine reversals, back I go into Hopscotch, avast, aboard, ahoy, sails amast UPDATE I m jumping ship on this one This has nothing to do with the quality of the writing, which is high quality wordsmanship, and I m enjoying the leapfrog structure but the Ultra Amplified Bohemian Paris atmosphere is too drunk on its own Bohemianeninity for me right now It s just not where my head is at I am feeling nothing but contempt for these characters who wander rubbish piles at midnight to find trash boxes and throw away coat hangers and paint them yellow to make mobiles for their disorderly apartments they somehow afford even though they don t work and every second reference in their conversation is to an obscure Hungarian silent film and they re always bringing gifts of Surrealist or Post Impressionist post cards or when they can t afford those just leaves of trees thanks and having very deep conversations in abandoned parking lots and wine stained cafes once again, if you can t afford a postcard how are you eating in cafes much less paying rent and doing coy things like destroying umbrellas as some gesture of infinity I would hate these people if I knew them The book is written very well, and I have kept it as a to read , but I want to give it the reading it deserves, which I am not capable of at this moment Perhaps being juxtaposed with reading i ek these characters just feel enormously frivolous MJ Nicholls and Richard give this caustic one star reviews, while Jimmy supplies an ecstatic 5 bright superterrestrial polygons accompanied by one of the greatest reviews ever to grace the digitized pixels of the Goodreads continuum Ever stalwart Nate D seems to stride the star poles, gifting us a review that intrigues as well as cautions Here s what Alexander Theroux has to say on the subject I love that novel Now that is a book that is full of puzzles and codes I wish I could have been a member of The Serpent Club What amazes me is that Cort zar invariably received praise and admiration for the high style, lists, loquacity, boldness, ingenuity, and encyclopedic invention in his fiction, particularly that book, while the mediocre book reviewers and invidious drabs to whom I am inevitably assigned by the New York Times drab and hateful ink stained failures, for the most part only scowl at my work I attribute this to envy and the ham handed convention that nowadays seems to prevail everywhere in this business that asks, Who does he think he is Wait, that was clearly muchTheroux s own invective against reviewers than about Hopscotch as a book Apologies Perhaps I can square the circle Reconcile the divergences Give at least one insight approaching validity We shall see I wanted to read this because I had seen it included in some lists of the twentieth century s great novels It is a very interesting book, quite entertaining in places but I can t pretend it is an easy read Before one even starts there is a preamble which explains that you have at least two choices either to read the first 56 chapters in sequence presumably ignoring the rest or to follow an alternative path through the book which is listed at the start and misses out Chapter 55 I opted for I wanted to read this because I had seen it included in some lists of the twentieth century s great novels It is a very interesting book, quite entertaining in places but I can t pretend it is an easy read Before one even starts there is a preamble which explains that you have at least two choices either to read the first 56 chapters in sequence presumably ignoring the rest or to follow an alternative path through the book which is listed at the start and misses out Chapter 55 I opted for the latter, and I think it was a wise decision, but there is enough logic to the second path to deduce what the straight path would have been like, since it does respect the ordering of the core chapters, with frequent and sometimes long digressions into the additional material, some of which is very odd and of limited relevance to the core story.The core plot is fairly simple it explores the world of Horacio Oliveira, an intellectual drifter The first part of the book is set in Paris in the 1950s, and although it seems quite episodic and random, the nature of this appears to reflect Oliveira s own experiences and his state of mind, and those of his friends there are also lengthy digressions on music jazz, classical and popular , literature, philosophy and much else, with a lot of surreal episodes reminiscent of some of the pataphysical Oulipo writers of the time.After a bizarre episode in which Oliveira is arrested after befriending a tramp, he is deported back to Argentina, and the remainder of the book charts his mental disintegration The writing is fragmented and often wilfully obscure though not as obscure as Joyce, who is clearly an influence and there are chapters which are literary games, for example a chapter in which the odd numbered lines follow one story and the even numbered lines another with breaks in mid sentence My impression was that as long as one does not get too obsessed with following everything in detail or understanding the many references, the whole is a pleasurable and stimulating reading experience, so not without a little reluctance I am awarding a full five stars, paff, the end Expendable appendices i I realised about halfway through that there were a lot of unfamiliar words in addition to much quoted French, Spanish and Latin I made this list of unfamiliar words that appear after this point antinomy, aulic, auscultation, cadastral, catoblepas, chitterling, chryselephantine, cinerary, coenaesthesis, columbarium, coprolite, cuniculture, cuspidation, echolalia, eclogue, elution, epistomology, epithelial, exordium, extravasation, geometrid, gnoseologist, helicoid, incunabula, macaronic, mana, mantic, mnemotechny, nebiole, nephelibate, obolus, oneiromancy, palmiped, promissoration, propedeutic, rotogravure, ruleman, satori, serape, soteriology, stupa, teleleological, tragacanth, trismegistic ii Chapter 55, which is omitted from the hopscotch path is effectively reproduced elsewhere, but without the lengthy but entertaining digressions on a bizarre treatise postulating an idealistic system of world government, which a character is reading while the action goes on around him iii I found that when following the hopscotch path I still wanted to know where I was in terms of overall progress, so I put the chapter lengths into a spreadsheet so that I could say how much I had read at any stage Since this may be useful to other readers, here are the numbers Chapter, Pages, Total, Percent73, 3, 3, 0.531, 10, 13, 2.302, 5, 18, 3.19116, 2, 20, 3.553, 5, 25, 4.4384, 4, 29, 5.144, 6, 35, 6.2171, 5, 40, 7.095, 4, 44, 7.8081, 1, 45, 7.9874, 2, 47, 8.336, 2, 49, 8.697, 1, 50, 8.878, 2, 52, 9.2293, 4, 56, 9.9368, 1, 57, 10.119, 4, 61, 10.82104, 1, 62, 10.9910, 2, 64, 11.3565, 2, 66, 11.7011, 3, 69, 12.23136, 1, 70, 12.4112, 6, 76, 13.48106, 1, 77, 13.6513, 3, 80, 14.18115, 1, 81, 14.3614, 3, 84, 14.89114, 1, 85, 15.07117, 1, 86, 15.2515, 6, 92, 16.31120, 2, 94, 16.6716, 3, 97, 17.20137, 1, 98, 17.3817, 6, 104, 18.4497, 1, 105, 18.6218, 4, 109, 19.33153, 1, 110, 19.5019, 5, 115, 20.3990, 5, 120, 21.2820, 11, 131, 23.23126, 1, 132, 23.4021, 5, 137, 24.2979, 3, 140, 24.8222, 3, 143, 25.3562, 3, 146, 25.8923, 25, 171, 30.32124, 2, 173, 30.67128, 1, 174, 30.8524, 5, 179, 31.74134, 1, 180, 31.9125, 2, 182, 32.27141, 3, 185, 32.8060, 1, 186, 32.9826, 3, 189, 33.51109, 2, 191, 33.8727, 4, 195, 34.5728, 33, 228, 40.43130, 1, 229, 40.60151, 1, 230, 40.78152, 1, 231, 40.96143, 3, 234, 41.49100, 4, 238, 42.2076, 2, 240, 42.55101, 2, 242, 42.91144, 2, 244, 43.2692, 3, 247, 43.79103, 1, 248, 43.97108, 6, 254, 45.0464, 3, 257, 45.57155, 6, 263, 46.63123, 3, 266, 47.16145, 1, 267, 47.34122, 3, 270, 47.87112, 2, 272, 48.23154, 6, 278, 49.2985, 1, 279, 49.47150, 1, 280, 49.6595, 3, 283, 50.18146, 1, 284, 50.3529, 5, 289, 51.24107, 1, 290, 51.42113, 1, 291, 51.6030, 2, 293, 51.9557, 5, 298, 52.8470, 1, 299, 53.01147, 1, 300, 53.1931, 6, 306, 54.2632, 4, 310, 54.96132, 2, 312, 55.3261, 2, 314, 55.6733, 2, 316, 56.0367, 2, 318, 56.3883, 2, 320, 56.74142, 3, 323, 57.2734, 7, 330, 58.5187, 1, 331, 58.69105, 1, 332, 58.8796, 4, 336, 59.5794, 1, 337, 59.7591, 1, 338, 59.9382, 1, 339, 60.1199, 11, 350, 62.0635, 4, 354, 62.77121, 1, 355, 62.9436, 15, 370, 65.6037, 7, 377, 66.8498, 1, 378, 67.0238, 2, 380, 67.3839, 2, 382, 67.7386, 1, 383, 67.9178, 4, 387, 68.6240, 4, 391, 69.3359, 1, 392, 69.5041, 30, 422, 74.82148, 1, 423, 75.0042, 2, 425, 75.3575, 1, 426, 75.5343, 4, 430, 76.24125, 3, 433, 76.7744, 5, 438, 77.66102, 1, 439, 77.8445, 4, 443, 78.5580, 2, 445, 78.9046, 6, 451, 79.9647, 5, 456, 80.85110, 1, 457, 81.0348, 5, 462, 81.91111, 3, 465, 82.4549, 4, 469, 83.16118, 1, 470, 83.3350, 3, 473, 83.87119, 1, 474, 84.0451, 7, 481, 85.2869, 2, 483, 85.6452, 2, 485, 85.9989, 3, 488, 86.5253, 4, 492, 87.2366, 1, 493, 87.41149, 1, 494, 87.5954, 10, 504, 89.36129, 6, 510, 90.43139, 1, 511, 90.60133, 11, 522, 92.55140, 2, 524, 92.91138, 3, 527, 93.44127, 2, 529, 93.7956, 23, 552, 97.87135, 1, 553, 98.0563, 1, 554, 98.2388, 1, 555, 98.4072, 1, 556, 98.5877, 1, 557, 98.76131, 1, 558, 98.9458, 2, 560, 99.29 131 again 55, 4, 564, 100.00 `KINDLE ⇨ Hopscotch ☠ Horacio Oliveira is an Argentinian writer who lives in Paris with his mistress, La Maga, surrounded by a loose knit circle of bohemian friends who call themselves the Club A child s death and La Maga s disappearance put an end to his life of empty pleasures and intellectual acrobatics, and prompt Oliveira to return to Buenos Aires, where he works by turns as a salesman, a keeper of a circus cat which can truly count, and an attendant in an insane asylum Hopscotch is the dazzling, freewheeling account of Oliveira s astonishing adventuresThe book is highly influenced by Henry Miller s reckless and relentless search for truth in post decadent Paris and Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki s modal teachings on Zen BuddhismCort zar s employment of interior monologue, punning, slang, and his use of different languages is reminiscent of Modernist writers like Joyce, although his main influences were Surrealism and the French New Novel, as well as the riffing aesthetic of jazz and New Wave CinemaIn , Gregory Rabassa won the first National Book Award to recognize the work of a translator, for his English language edition of Hopscotch Julio Cort zar was so pleased with Rabassa s translation of Hopscotch that he recommended the translator to Gabriel Garc a M rquez when Garc a M rquez was looking for someone to translate his novel One Hundred Years of Solitude into English Rabassa s One Hundred Years of Solitude improved the original, according to Garc a M rquez