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DOWNLOAD ç High Exposure: An Enduring Passion for Everest and Unforgiving Places ì For generations of resolute adventurers, from George Mallory to Sir Edmund Hillary to Jon Krakauer, Mount Everest and the world s other greatest peaks have provided the ultimate testing ground But the question remains Why climb In High Exposure, elite mountaineer and acclaimed Everest filmmaker David Breashears answers with an intimate and captivating look at his life For Breashears, climbing has never been a question of risk taking Rather, it is the pursuit of excellence and a quest for self knowledge Danger comes, he argues, when ambition blinds reason The stories this world class climber and great adventurer tells will surprise you from discussions of competitiveness on the heights to a frank description of theEverest tragedy 4.5 stars Something about a book can get under your skin and you just really enjoy it I liked how each section was another chunk of Breashears life and his experiences You really saw the natural evolution of him going from rock climber to cinematographer to director Reinforces that no one is stuck in one thing keep your eyes and ears open and see what happens I even liked hearing about living in Gillette, WY to work on an oil rig just to get some cash He s met so many different kinds of 4.5 stars Something about a book can get under your skin and you just really enjoy it I liked how each section was another chunk of Breashears life and his experiences You really saw the natural evolution of him going from rock climber to cinematographer to director Reinforces that no one is stuck in one thing keep your eyes and ears open and see what happens I even liked hearing about living in Gillette, WY to work on an oil rig just to get some cash He s met so many different kinds of people through his adventures and he has a pretty acute eye when it comes to sizing up people Thought he did a great job of translating how you can t let your ego drive your ambition when mountain climbing If the mountain is saying no that day, you better listen or you could very well die I had followed the disaster on Everest in May 1996 so reading his perception of the events as they unfolded was really interesting Thought the whole thing was simply a wonderful book Goodness, this guy is an jerk The book opens in 1996 as the tragedy of that year is beginning to unfold As I read, I found myself thinking, Wow, this dude is awfully smug I ve read a lot of books about the 1996 disaster and of course some of them are very uncomplimentary towards Rob Hall his actions I m not trying to be a Rob Hall apologist, the tone that David Breashears takes just makes him seem like a big know it all I found myself wondering if he really knew these people or if he wa Goodness, this guy is an jerk The book opens in 1996 as the tragedy of that year is beginning to unfold As I read, I found myself thinking, Wow, this dude is awfully smug I ve read a lot of books about the 1996 disaster and of course some of them are very uncomplimentary towards Rob Hall his actions I m not trying to be a Rob Hall apologist, the tone that David Breashears takes just makes him seem like a big know it all I found myself wondering if he really knew these people or if he was just pretending But I kept at it, and the middle section is pretty good He is a freaky good mountain climber, I ll give him that Once we get back to 1996 at the end of the book, though, I was ready to strangle him again So sanctimonious So, Oh, I would never, ever make mistakes His team decides to go back up on the mountain, of course, after all the tragedy, and as he s filming two team members on the summit slope, he decides the framing is all off makes them come back down do it againAre you kidding me His many accomplishments nonwithstanding, his attitude makes this very unpalatable I d like to reread my mountain woe books to see when he crops up and how others relate to him OK, this book is not as rip roaring as Krakauer s Into Thin Air, and yet it s an excellent insight into what makes a mountaineer tick I was moved by Breashear s account of the Everest 96 disaster, and found his rendering of the survival of Beck Weathers perhaps evenmoving than the account in Krakauer s masterful tome Similarly moving was his account of the recovery of the camera containing the last picture of mountaineer Bruce Herrod, staring into the lens in triumph on the summit of Ev OK, this book is not as rip roaring as Krakauer s Into Thin Air, and yet it s an excellent insight into what makes a mountaineer tick I was moved by Breashear s account of the Everest 96 disaster, and found his rendering of the survival of Beck Weathers perhaps evenmoving than the account in Krakauer s masterful tome Similarly moving was his account of the recovery of the camera containing the last picture of mountaineer Bruce Herrod, staring into the lens in triumph on the summit of Everest, soon to collapse and die with the very camera in his pocket The image strikes me as similar in spirit to that of Chris McCandless in front of the bus in Krakauer s Into the Wild.Breashears life story is fascinating and one sometimes wishes that, despite the inherent hardships, that one was raised as an army brat, because they seem to grow up with a special kind of resolve.There are fascinating accounts of Breashears early climbs in Colorado and as a crew member on the set in the Italian Dolomites of the 1980 s Stallone thriller, Cliffhanger And, of course, there s Everest 96, one of the great adventure stories of all time, about which several books have been written.I don t know what it is about the books I ve been choosing lately, or if it s just an indicator of my tenuous emotional state of late note in 2009 , but this book ultimately moved me to tears, and even if it s not quite the achievement that Krakauer s book is, it is nonetheless a first rate adventure book as well as a worthy biography As a sidenote, it baffles me how he could have let such an alluring woman as Veronique Choa slip out of his life Oh well, I know from experience, it happens.This is probably a four star book, at best, but the enjoyment factor was high for me, and mountaineering buffs won t be disappointed KevinR Ky edited and amended in 2016 Pretty darn good I have a sneaky feeling that David Breashers might bethan a little arrogant, but these extreme mountain climber folk are definitely nuts, so it isn t too surprising if they are also a bit prickly or difficult Or hard to be married to Oh by the way honey, did I mention I m off to Pakistan to take pictures while hanging from a little rope 20,000 feet in the air See you in four months if I don t fall It s not just climbing that is so unfathomable to me, the traveling Pretty darn good I have a sneaky feeling that David Breashers might bethan a little arrogant, but these extreme mountain climber folk are definitely nuts, so it isn t too surprising if they are also a bit prickly or difficult Or hard to be married to Oh by the way honey, did I mention I m off to Pakistan to take pictures while hanging from a little rope 20,000 feet in the air See you in four months if I don t fall It s not just climbing that is so unfathomable to me, the traveling you do to get to where you want to go is scary enough read his tale of taking a taxi in India in the middle of the night and going for hours in the wrong direction I am no adventurer myself, but it is certainly entertaining to read about someone who is It was also interesting to hear his account of the 1996 Everest disaster, as he figured prominently in the rescue efforts