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I disgustingly bubbled up my thrill to my son and wife while driving along the coast of eastern Florida, eighty degrees and sunshine, the ocean beckoning and the beach a friendly almost vacant place ahead at Sebastian Inlet for our dog to run, my trills bursting with the gleaning of my new favorite literary one named Simon who offers so much and is yet unencumbered by any long term sense of responsibility, his future in the moment always, and his pleasu I disgustingly bubbled up my thrill to my son and wife while driving along the coast of eastern Florida, eighty degrees and sunshine, the ocean beckoning and the beach a friendly almost vacant place ahead at Sebastian Inlet for our dog to run, my trills bursting with the gleaning of my new favorite literary one named Simon who offers so much and is yet unencumbered by any long term sense of responsibility, his future in the moment always, and his pleasure engulfed in the world of nature, his earth mother, the one he feels the closest to, and my son asks,Is he better than SeymourOf course I could not answer him in a direct way as in a yes or no, but instead chose to express to him that the Glass family as a whole is better than the Tanners, but taken individually Simon is better than even Zooey or Buddy or Franny, or their mom, and how can anyone exactly say anything regarding Seymour as we basically know him only through A Perfect Day For Bananafish and whatever Buddy or Zooey or Franny chooses to say about him I certainly love to death the Glasses, but the Tanners are a remarkable family as well Robert Walser s clever use of Simon as both the youngest and the one to forge our way through this three hundred and fifty page book of simple delights that verge on the edges of our greatest philosophy But the book is not without its customary pain, as anyone knows must equally accompany our given joy along the way What was immediately striking to me in The Tanners by Robert Walser was the way in which the author spoke directly to me as if he and I were close old friends and he was revealing to me everything we already both knew about life and art and pain and love, and our mutual devotion to finding out our personal truths Even the critical side of brother Kaspar and others from time to time rang true as we all have bad days and seem to rise some mornings from the wrong side of the bed The result being the Tanners all laughing about their personal inadequacies and bitter faults, and this is why it was refreshing and invigorating to me I laughed to myself when the serious painter brother Kaspar arose from bed one day to decide after years of devoted vocation to his art that he would almost just because give up his love of painting to become a farmer I loved the triangle love affair brothers Kaspar and Simon had for the already married Klara How sweet and innocent it seemed and fortunate for Klara to be loved so intensely by a connected pair of suitors The shotgun blasts projected by the much traveled and disconnected hunter husband of Klara also were timely in portending the wrong in general deemed by society and certain therefore to damn their love relationship.I loved the many jobs Simon took in order to make a living and his trying on of these different employments for size, performing all his tasks and obligatory responsibilities to perfection and then up and quitting abruptly without warning, and then relating long and winded reasons why he wasn t suited for the job he did so well These instances were really something and resulted in myself wishing again and again I had the courage this Simon had for walking away in the spirit of freedom and another chance to smell the roses blooming outside a typical life of nine to five I remember forty years ago when my 12th grade English teacher told me I needed to work as others did in order to afford the freedom money gave to those of us willing to keep our noses pressed to the ground I followed her advice and have never been convinced after all these years that her advice was correct or what I needed I have continually envied artists such as Bob Dylan and Cormac McCarthy who never worked a regular job in their lives and followed their impulses for living a life of the artist Of course, I was never one who could take from others, or live off their generosity I had to earn my way, which is, and was, a segment of the blue collar culture I have carried since childhood and learned from my Finnish heritage The many walks Simon takes throughout the book are all scrumptiously well written Walser makes your body feel, but also the reader must bring his her own life experiences and point of view to the page in order to get the most of what he is expressing It helps to be a like minded soul as well for I doubt many hard working industrious money makers could relate to Simon s relative acceptance and relief for being out of steady employment so often and much of the time But through this beloved Simon character Walser makes me believe in what I myself am doing with the time remaining of my life It is a bit regular and bowel like that I write with the consistency I do Rarely a day goes by when I am not expressing myself with pen, and eager to do so I feel I have something to say that is worthy of the eyes that happen onto my page I know today that there are other like minded individuals throughout the world we live in and there is ample proof allowed by the books they read It is no wonder that brutally fierce State regimes like to burn books There is so much power in the word Robert Walser is almost dreamlike in his detailing of time in the forest or on the many long walks his Simon takes pleasure in It is almost as if we are walking with him as he describes the different scenes and who and what he meets throughout his adventure My own cabin in northern Michigan is surrounded on all sides by the Huron National Forest What makes this forest different from many others is the combination sugar sand, red and white oak, and several species of conifer, specifically strands of northern, white pine, and jack The soft and comfortable forest floor is covered often by a sea of elegant ferns and when not carpeted by these beautiful plants there is a soft composting bed of a dry, ten thousand years of plant and bark of the all fall dead The forest consists of almost a million acres The smell is incredible with its mix of pine and sand and rotting wood The air moves freely through the wide expanse of majestic trunks and elegant limbs like standing hoards of sentinels guarding the rolling land And my cabin sits in the middle of this all Our small community nestled within the forest and surrounded by seven inland lakes that add another scent to the scientific formula When resting comfortably in my outside chair, or supine in my lounge, these smells waft through and I amthan satisfied Hedwig, Simon s sister, has her own set of problems as she considers her happiness as a school teacher, the respect given her though she feels oppressed by the daily grind of it all, the number of students she has to deal with, and the route that life has taken her Her nighttime of regret punishes her so severely that Hedwig decides to leave it all instead for a life in the city as a governess, teaching and taking care of two young children, following her mistress s orders, and in a letter she composes for employment with this family pleading that she deserves the job and that there is no one better than she to perform the duties expected by her hiring But by morning Hedwig is feeling better She has slept and feels equipped to handle her days again with the number of children in her tutelage She is also prepared to find a husband and to marry, becoming his for a lifetime of rearing children, raising crops, and keeping a household together It could be construed that Hedwig is as troubled as her brother Simon is, but the fact is, she isn t Fact is, Simon isn t either It is the judgmental uncourageous public who casts their looks down upon the wayward man who is in search oflife within his living Almost the entire book deals with his not working a regular job, and if he is working, then what takes place behind these doors and why it is important to seek a life outside, under the sky, away from the masses, and without shame for not measuring up to others expectations Robert Walser was not a big, strapping man He wasn t a smooth operator who could charm the ladies There wasn t any threat deemed imminent by his behavior as if he was after something or attempting to get untoward, and for example, make his way into a woman s hidden place beneath her underwear as other men most likely are wont to do And because of this non threatening character of Walser s it is easy in my opinion to read him Easier than say an Ernest Hemingway or acontemporary Jim Harrison for lack of better examples Robert Walser is a gentle soul and most obviously lacking any agenda or having something to prove That is not to say that I am not of like mind as Walser and that I also have a desirefor the company of women than men, but my appearance could prove skeptical to a stranger who might think otherwise of me as I am quite a large man, a strapping and powerfully built man, and I certainly have want and attitude for hurting others who threaten me and other men like our gentle Walser Just last night in a fit of boredom I asked our server in an outdoor drinking establishment as to where one might find a good place to engage in an old fashioned fist fight The server immediately went from a step away and erect to areceptive posture for leaning in and smiling, an acceptance now on her face for a man she just might findto her liking Her new opening up to my violent love was not wasted on either my adult son to my right nor my wife sitting across the table next to her sister and brother in law Of course I was only kidding her, but never did I relax my disposition to suggest other than a sincere and almost crazy need for being involved this very evening in some kind of crazy fight But Walser too stands up to any and all persons unfairly passing judgment on himself or others He speaks in long monologues and argues the good and bad points of certain behavior and stereotypical ideas society has proffered on the masses I love these types of intelligent tirades though at times this character Simon goes off the deep end to become what he admits is a bit silly for the simple reason he feels better afterward and can finally go to sleep I know how he feels I do the same thing sometimes I am noserious about what I am in a tirade about than when Jesus went fishing It just feels good to let off some steam and to be absurd But not everybody appreciates this type of behavior and it can provide for some unpleasant experiences all around The Tanners all have their own personal struggles and it is interesting to be intimately let in on them One example being when Simon s sister Hedwig throws him out of her house after his spending three joyous winter months freeloading there, and in his unique point of view, finds his dismissal to have a good side She said to me that all she felt for me was a faint, insuppressible contempt, but she said that so sweetly I couldn t help but feel it as a caress.For the naysayers in our midst, the esteemed readers of so much other fiction to be themselves thought of in the highest esteem here because of their thoughtful and intelligent reviews but nonetheless regular discounters of the writings of Robert Walser based on previous books they read such as Selected Stories and Jakob von Gunten, please note that these two books were translated by a man person by the name of Middleton and in no way should the other works by Walser that others of us love such as The Assistant, The Robber, and The Tanners be tarnished because, truth be told, these beloved three gems all were translated by an enormously talented lady by the name of Susan Bernofsky She is the brightest star in the galaxy of German translations Enough cannot be said in regards to the talent of Susan Bernofsky She makes everyone better, reader or writer, male or female, and never disappoints in the tanners, as in much of walser s writing, his singular style is what captivates most walser s works tend to be thinly plotted, yet the reader is easily carried away by the characters inner workings as w.g sebald notes in the book s introductory remembrance, everything written in these incomparable books has as their author might himself have said a tendency to vanish into thin air the very passage which a moment before seemed so significant can suddenly appear quite unremarkable in the tanners, as in much of walser s writing, his singular style is what captivates most walser s works tend to be thinly plotted, yet the reader is easily carried away by the characters inner workings as w.g sebald notes in the book s introductory remembrance, everything written in these incomparable books has as their author might himself have said a tendency to vanish into thin air the very passage which a moment before seemed so significant can suddenly appear quite unremarkable earlier in the intro, sebald writes, how is one to understand an author who was so beset by shadows and who, nonetheless, illumined every page with the most genial light, an author who created humorous sketches from pure despair, who almost always wrote the same thing and yet never repeated himself, to whom his own thoughts, honed on the tiniest details, became incomprehensible, who had his feet firmly on the ground yet was always getting lost in the clouds, whose prose has the tendency to dissolve upon reading, so that only a few hours later one can barely remember the ephemeral figures, events and things of which it spoke indeed, walser is quite the enigmatic figure, but his writing has a bucolic quality about it that induces a sort of melancholic revelry without question, there is no mistaking one of walser s works for that of another author the tanners relates the tale of simon tanner, a youngish, ne er do well who spends his time loafing around the city, later the countryside, and, once again, the city simon is a very bright, congenial young man, curious and introspective, but without any real lasting direction simon s personality recalls the precocious title character from walser s jakob von gunten, albeit slightly older simon could easily be the descendant of melville s bartleby or one of pessoa s heteronyms we are introduced to each of simon s three brothers and his sister as he wanders hither and yon, led by the vaguest inclinations of where to go and what to do next seeking employment only insofar as he it seeks him, simon flutters from job to job as it suits his mood and interest with a magnetic personality, simon attracts the attentions of both men and women with relative ease.there is much to enjoy in the tanners, as there is in all of walser s writing many of the book s richest passages are contained in the letters simon writes to his siblings, and these insightful epistles alone make the story a worthwhile read admittedly, the book seems a touch too lengthy, and whereas walser never repeats himself per se, at times the work s overall effect does suffer somewhat from a narrative redundancy in all, however, the tanners further illustrates that the swiss writer was a remarkably talented writer under appreciated even now, some 50 years after his death eerily presaged with utmost accuracy in this book , perhaps the tanners will expose walser to an ever greater audience.the lengthy passage on country life written by simon , excerpted below, is utterly stunning in the country, even the poorest man has fewer worries than a far less impoverished city dweller for in the city everything is measured by human words and human deeds while worries here go on worrying as quietly as they may, and pain provides pain s own natural surcease in the city, everyone races about pell mell trying to get rich for which reason so many think themselves bitterly poor , while in the country, at least to a large extent, the poor are spared the insult of constantly being compared with the rich they can peacefully go on breathing despite their poverty, for they have a whole sky above them to breathe what is the sky in the city The book starts out with a job interview, which made me fear that this would be like The Assistant Part 2, another book about holding a job The familiar elements were there the long winded flowery speeches, the expressions of extreme emotion, the humorous toying with tone I loved that book, mind you, but with a different book I wanted a different experience.Luckily, things moved quickly on and so did Simon, the main character, who can t keep a job or a residence for longer than a few weeks, The book starts out with a job interview, which made me fear that this would be like The Assistant Part 2, another book about holding a job The familiar elements were there the long winded flowery speeches, the expressions of extreme emotion, the humorous toying with tone I loved that book, mind you, but with a different book I wanted a different experience.Luckily, things moved quickly on and so did Simon, the main character, who can t keep a job or a residence for longer than a few weeks, and wanders aimlessly throughout the book, but in a most delicious manner The prose, too, wanders aimlessly, never settling down on a singular purpose, but searching, revelling, perhaps dilly dallying, sometimes singing a tune in its little head, or bursting out in a most unwarranted way then shrinking back slightly I found this to be Walser s most personal and touching novel so far, with earnest passages that pondered a number of different topics art, women, misfortune, ambition, poverty, city life, etc.How reprehensible it is when those blessed with commodities insist on ignoring the poor Better to torment them, force them into indentured servitude, inflict compulsion and blows this at least produces a connection, fury and a pounding heart, and these too constitute a form of relationship But to cower in elegant homes behind golden garden gates, fearful lest the breath of warm humankind touch you, unable to indulge in extravagances for fear they might be glimpsed by the embittered oppressed, to oppress and yet lack the courage to show yourself as an oppressor, even to fear the ones you are oppressing, feeling ill at ease in your own wealth and begrudging others their ease, to resort to disagreeable weapons that require neither true audacity nor manly courage, to have money, but only money, without splendor That s what things look like in our cities at present p 172 Throughout the book Simon returns in mind and or body repeatedly to his siblings Klaus, Kaspar, Hedwig, and Emil I forget if this is his name, since he is mentioned only once The particular dynamic of the Tanner family is sketched out through these episodes where you get to know each one personally, and you see how these interrelations affect them, how each plays a strict role despite him herself, and how Simon loves each one differently The mix of emotions is captured perfectly Despite the humor and the lightness of Walser s voice, it is impressive how he can be simultaneously sad also, but his sadness is one that s rarely spoken out loud, and is less a solid emotion than a wistfulness you might catch in the eyes of a stranger departing on a long journey It s a quietness that moves below the wildlife of his prose And every once in a while it rises to the surface with surprising candor For her children, our mother had, when she was still healthy, something almost majestic about her that frightened and intimidated us when she became ill in her mind, we pitied her It was a crazy leap to make from fearful, mystical awe to pity All that lay between tenderness and trust remained unknown to us And so it happened that our pity was strongly intermingled with an unspeakable regret over all we d never felt, which then caused us to pity her all thedeeply.The novel feels messy, unfinished in parts, but in the best of ways, like a well loved pair of trousers, colorful patches over all its holes Some sections seem to be left out entirely, and you re left imagining what happened between the last episode and this one, where surely Simon being slightly bipolar, perhaps was feeling reticent, perhaps a little down, but you re just happy he s talking again now, and you want him to keep talking Sebald s introduction to this volume is well worth the read also I love thinking about Sebald reading Walser, these two complete outsiders in very different ways, connecting over the ellipsis of literature A 350 page paperback book which should be bulkier in weight but the pages purposively made small makes it surprisingly light Despite no sense of any formal plot I read for long stretches, growing tired, the book becoming heavier Its weight alternated and at times defied external prodding s.Simon Tanner flits what appears as lightly through his life At times his manic enjoyment of nature is breathtaking It seemed to me there was an element of desperation in this lightness His flight was some A 350 page paperback book which should be bulkier in weight but the pages purposively made small makes it surprisingly light Despite no sense of any formal plot I read for long stretches, growing tired, the book becoming heavier Its weight alternated and at times defied external prodding s.Simon Tanner flits what appears as lightly through his life At times his manic enjoyment of nature is breathtaking It seemed to me there was an element of desperation in this lightness His flight was something away from not towards anything graspable Looked at it was his, Walser s, rush from the shadows of melancholia and whatever ills of the spirit that waited in the wings Walser never says this outright His method is one of absence The inner struggle the story in this novel that has no beginning or end is evoked in what is not said or shown The fearful shadowed part of his being is carved out by his distinctive reveries, conscious attempts at acceptable appearance in others eyes, the slippage of manic rhetoric, his refusals to participate and succeed in life What is left is the heart of the novel, its bleeding guts This for me was not lightness but the lightness was the grim heaviness of Simon s life The simplicity of the writing was the art of evocation It made something which was not there spellbinding The confines wrought out of the desperation to manage such a life left him with an unobstructed view of others, the manners and strivings of society around him, the herald of success if one s being and spirit were sacrificed to obey its rules It appeared absurd, pathetic, possibly silly but not comedic How was he to participate and why This left him with no commonality Isolated, he had no community yet there were isolated moments where others saw a quest for connection in his eyes and a desire on their part to know him Any further details about these relevant situations will be spoilers and I am trying hard to invite rather than preclude anyone form reading this unique and near flawless book I can splash all over the page what is known of Walser s life and make what sounds like smooth equations to the characters and situations inhabiting the book I might even sound smart to myself but this would be an affront to Walser and, The Tanners.When I think of spiritual quests I tend towards thoughts of conventional organized religious practices This book has further confirmed for me that the reading of fine literature is well placed in this list The Tanners, along with being a vast literary experience was also spiritual in its reading and afterwards Ineffable and enigmatic there was something pure, woven from silken thread so fine as not to be seen, always graspable there in front of me yet as I opened my hand it was gone Nothing happens here But who cares when the writing is good The protagonist Simon is a living ode to eloquent impertinence When he is fired from a tedious office job, the manager asks whether he would nevertheless like a letter of recommendation, to which Simon says From now on I shall write my own references I shall no longer call upon anyone other than myself when someone asks me for references, which will make the best possible impression on sensible clear minded people Readers familia Nothing happens here But who cares when the writing is good The protagonist Simon is a living ode to eloquent impertinence When he is fired from a tedious office job, the manager asks whether he would nevertheless like a letter of recommendation, to which Simon says From now on I shall write my own references I shall no longer call upon anyone other than myself when someone asks me for references, which will make the best possible impression on sensible clear minded people Readers familiar with the peculiar Walser will know what a huge role country walks play in his fiction and, so far as we know, in his own life His celebrated long story, The Walk, is his most sustained paean to the delights and meditative qualities of a bucolic amble When he s not delivering speeches at once graceful and impudent, Simon spends most of this novel on walks Read this book for charming, fleeting descriptions of the villages and lakes, mountains and forests, bridges and boats that Simon passes on his walks In Walser s world, there doesn t seem to be muchthan elegant ephemera simon says not the burst of perfect and heart crumpling song that was JAKOB VON GUNTEN, THE TANNERS isa patchwork of monologues, but both share the same saint s heart and the ability to lay out all the observable open secrets of our every day.some writers, you enter their house in faith and give yourself up to in awe despite some weaker establishing shots, the occasional hastiness orfrequently here, the overlong lingering the heart of the miracle is everywhere apparent nonethe simon says not the burst of perfect and heart crumpling song that was JAKOB VON GUNTEN, THE TANNERS isa patchwork of monologues, but both share the same saint s heart and the ability to lay out all the observable open secrets of our every day.some writers, you enter their house in faith and give yourself up to in awe despite some weaker establishing shots, the occasional hastiness orfrequently here, the overlong lingering the heart of the miracle is everywhere apparent nonetheless and anyway, you were converted by their best moment and that wasthan enough.and THE TANNERS does compensate the faithful, not in least ways by being lovely autobiography even predictive autobiography And he d frozen to death here, without a doubt, and he must have been lying here on the path for a while Sebastian must have sunk to the ground here with an immense, no longer endurable weariness How noble a grave he chose for himself What splendid peace reposing and growing stiff beneath fir branches in the snow You couldn t have chosen anything better People tend to inflict harm on the eccentric and this is what you were and then laugh at their pain Give my greetings to the dear, silent dead beneath the earth and don t get too badly scorched in the eternal fires of nonexistence You are elsewhere 154 5.other compensations include a defense of the poet s otherwise failures And never be so swift to look in scorn upon someone who is failing or appears lethargic or inactive How quickly his sunshine, his poems can arise from these long, dull dreams 109 the helplessness and foolishness of loving art too much No sensible man allows himself to be made a fool of by any one thing, tormented and tricked for so long 78 the agonies of teaching But when I m teaching, I think of other things, thingsdistant and greater than their little souls 188 comments on religion Religion here has too little sky, it smells too little of the soil 282 and on misfortune Let me tell you, I m a friend of misfortune, a very intimate friend 258 of possible further interest, another walser site which reveals some of the source material Between 1936 and 1955, Carl Seelig, who would become known as a biographer of Albert Einstein, took nearly fifty long walks with his friend the Swiss writer Robert Walser Seelig would meet Walser at the train station at Herisau in eastern Switzerland or at the sanitarium where Walser had been since the early 1930s, diagnosed with schizophrenia Seelig s notes of their walks and conversations have appeared in German as Wanderungen mit Robert Walser and in French translation, but the book has never appeared in English.from s notes have been translated by bob skinner into english on this nice site with a good search feature, so that a search for Geschwister Tanner brings up reveals the following anecdote Our conversation touched on Geschwister Tanner, of which Robert said I wrote it in Berlin in three or four weeks, essentially without corrections Bruno Cassirer cut out a few sections he found boring, like the one where Simon found the clerk s manuscript in the oven That appeared later in the journal Marz, where Hermann Hesse was an editor My praiseworthy medical director, Dr Hinrichsen, who saw himself as an important writer, said once that the beginning was good, but the rest was impossible He said it as though he would have gagged if he d been forced to read the whole thing Robert laughed heartily at his own description |DOWNLOAD PDF ⚆ Geschwister Tanner : Roman ♶ Mit leichtem Gep ck und offenen, unbestechlichen Augen wandert dieser moderne Taugenichts durch die Welt und am Ende wird nichts aus ihm als das Vergn gen des Lesers Franz KafkaRobert Walser geh rt zu den Autoren der klassischen Moderne Geschwister Tanner ist sein erster und zugleich sein unbeschwertester Roman Wie sein Verfasser ist der Held des Buches, Simon Tanner, besessen von einem unb ndigen Freiheitsdrang und betrachtet die Welt und die Menschen ganz unbefangen, nicht mit einem verbildeten, verstopften Kopf Das bringt ihn in die kuriosesten Konflikte mit der Welt der Konventionen, mit den Angepa ten, den von Karriere und Konkurrenz Kompromittierten Durch seine Arglosigkeit provoziert er sie und besch mt sie durch das, was sie verloren haben Phantasie, Humor, gesunden Menschenverstand und materielle UnbestechlichkeitDie Geschwister Tanner sind ein M rchen, und sie sind f r mich das erstaunlichste M rchen, das je geschrieben wurde, weil es kein anderes gibt, das so nahe an der Realit t spielt Peter Bichsel Five meager stars I would give this book a galaxy of stars. An area is always beautiful because it always bears witness to the life present both in nature and architecture To build a settlement in a pretty meadow and woodland region might seem at first somewhat barbaric, but in the end every eye will make its peace with the unification of building and world, finding all sorts of enchanting views to glimpse from between the new walls, and forget its irritably critical condemnation, which after all never gives rise to better things We need not compare th An area is always beautiful because it always bears witness to the life present both in nature and architecture To build a settlement in a pretty meadow and woodland region might seem at first somewhat barbaric, but in the end every eye will make its peace with the unification of building and world, finding all sorts of enchanting views to glimpse from between the new walls, and forget its irritably critical condemnation, which after all never gives rise to better things We need not compare the old and new buildings like architectural scholars we can take pleasure in both sorts, in both the modest and the vainglorious When I see a building standing here, there s no cause to think that if I find it insufficiently attractive I can just knock it down, for it stands rather firmly on its foundations, housing a great many sentient persons, and is therefore a respectable entity whose creation was the work of many diligent hands Those who search for beauty must oftentimes feel that the mere search for beauty in this world gets you only so far, that there are other things worth finding besides the good fortune of being able to stand before a charming antique The struggle of the poor for a bit of peace I m referring to the so called Workers Question is itself quite an interesting matter, so to speak, and must certainly engage a stalwart mindthan the question of whether a house is well or poorly situated in a landscape What smooth tongued idlers this world contains To be sure Every thinking head counts, and every question is priceless, but it s surelyadmirable and doeshonor to our heads to address life questions first anddelicate artistic questions later Of course questions of art are sometimes life questions as well, but life questions are questions of art in a far higher and nobler sense Naturally I m thinking this way now because the first question on my mind is how I shall go on existing, given that my sole employment is copying out addresses for paltry day wages, and I cannot sympathize with the snobbery of art since at the moment it strikes me as the most irrelevant thing on earth and indeed just consider, what is art compared with Nature, which dies and awakens over and over again What means does art have when it wishes to portray a blossoming fragrant tree, or the face of a human being I admit I m musing somewhat insolently now, condescendingly or rather furiously con ascendingly, from down in the depths inhabited by people who have no money The thing is, I m critical but at the same time feel quite melancholy because of my lack of funds I ve got to get some money, it s quite simple Borrowed money isn t money money must be earned or stolen or received as a gift and then there s one thingevening In the evening I m generally tired and dispirited Simply marvellous Give it a try, maybe you like it as much orethen me I don t know, which angels have kissed him, the lovely Mr Walser, for me a divine writer Maybe you are too one of them who likes from time to time to go for a solitary walk, and get enchanted by your surroundings or maybe, sometimes you have the opportunity to stop in at a crowded restaurant, or bar or pub, sitting there alone but not lonely at a table and it happens that you fall a bit in love with all the busy Simply marvellous Give it a try, maybe you like it as much orethen me I don t know, which angels have kissed him, the lovely Mr Walser, for me a divine writer Maybe you are too one of them who likes from time to time to go for a solitary walk, and get enchanted by your surroundings or maybe, sometimes you have the opportunity to stop in at a crowded restaurant, or bar or pub, sitting there alone but not lonely at a table and it happens that you fall a bit in love with all the busy funny people and get overwhelmed with all the sparkling noises which occurs in that universe..yes then you will enjoy Walsers Sister Tanner to the fullest.image Karl Walser, Bildnis seines Bruders Robert Walser, 1900Even if you call a fantastic plot your primary destination for enjoying reading, what in this case is not encounterable at all, i can imagine, that you will get caught by Walsers writing,cause its beauty will maybe find a way to your heart and touch you