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I hadtime than I d like to read this past weekend read this book The first 1 3 didn t really pull me in, but after that it did The book is a first hand look by Greene at his father s death, with whom he d never communicated well His father defined much of his life by his experience in WWII While unimpressed by most people, Greene s father held the heroes of WWII in very high esteem, especially Paul Tibbets, the man who assembled led the team that delivered the atomic bombs to Japan I hadtime than I d like to read this past weekend read this book The first 1 3 didn t really pull me in, but after that it did The book is a first hand look by Greene at his father s death, with whom he d never communicated well His father defined much of his life by his experience in WWII While unimpressed by most people, Greene s father held the heroes of WWII in very high esteem, especially Paul Tibbets, the man who assembled led the team that delivered the atomic bombs to Japan He also was the pilot for the first bomb, the one dropped on Hiroshima Young Greene meets Tibbets in learning his story, learnsabout his father than he d ever known before.The story is several entwined well done We learn about both Greenes, their relationships history We also learn about the men that fought in WWII, especially Tibbets, a very tough man who held one of the toughest jobs in history How he met the challenge why he was able to are very interesting An easy to read book written by a well respected journalist, Bob Greene On the surface, the story is about the journalist s interview with Paul Tibbets, the pilot of the Enola Gay, and his interaction with some of the flight s crew The surviving crew members have lived into their 70 s and 80 s and reflect on the past and evaluate the present The topic of whether the atomic bombing of Hiroshima was justified ethically or practically is addressed throughout.However, the book runs a parallel sto An easy to read book written by a well respected journalist, Bob Greene On the surface, the story is about the journalist s interview with Paul Tibbets, the pilot of the Enola Gay, and his interaction with some of the flight s crew The surviving crew members have lived into their 70 s and 80 s and reflect on the past and evaluate the present The topic of whether the atomic bombing of Hiroshima was justified ethically or practically is addressed throughout.However, the book runs a parallel storyline the relationship of the author with his father, also a WWII veteran Thus, there is much reflection on the father son relationship I believe the most striking passages in the book was the attendance of the Enola Gay crew survivors at a Japanese stage show in Branson, MO One cannot overlook the irony of it all A good story on Paul Tibbets but otherwise a disjointed read Wantedon Paul but had too much on Bob Greene s dad It was like two stories in one book Not trying to put down the book or Bob s dad but it was not what I expected on the pilot and mastermind of the bombing of Hiroshima I wantedon Paul and less on Bob s dad in this book. I think that this could have been better The layout was disjointed and at times it felt like the author was using General Tibbits as a therapist to work out his daddy issues This book it touted as a story about a son his father and the man who stopped WWII For me it was a son asking questions to the man who ended WWII that he wanted to ask his dad but never did He assumed that his dad would have felt the same way about life and society as General Tibbits because they both participated in WWI I think that this could have been better The layout was disjointed and at times it felt like the author was using General Tibbits as a therapist to work out his daddy issues This book it touted as a story about a son his father and the man who stopped WWII For me it was a son asking questions to the man who ended WWII that he wanted to ask his dad but never did He assumed that his dad would have felt the same way about life and society as General Tibbits because they both participated in WWII Not all men are the same but maybe I missed the meaning With all that said it is still interesting to hear General Tibbits opinions InsightfulIf you re in to history, or curious about some of the men who flew the WWII Mission to Hiroshima, this book is wonderful Additionally, the Author writes of the illness and eventual death of his father, also a WWII Veteran The reader can t help but relate to the loss of a parent, and the insights gained along the way Personally, I loved hearing from General Tibet s, Jr, as well as from Thomas Ferebee, the bombardier , and also Dutch Van Kirk, the Navigator remember, no computers InsightfulIf you re in to history, or curious about some of the men who flew the WWII Mission to Hiroshima, this book is wonderful Additionally, the Author writes of the illness and eventual death of his father, also a WWII Veteran The reader can t help but relate to the loss of a parent, and the insights gained along the way Personally, I loved hearing from General Tibet s, Jr, as well as from Thomas Ferebee, the bombardier , and also Dutch Van Kirk, the Navigator remember, no computers back then The Navigator took readings from the stars if it was dark which it was, the first few hours of the flight once the sun was up, he used maps or reconnaissance photos to navigate their way All in all, an eye opening read I found myself touched by several places in this book as it moved back and forth from the author s father who had served and now was dying and Brigadier General Paul Tibbits, Major Dutch Van Kirk, and Colonel Tom Ferebee who were the crew that flew the Enola Gay, as the idea of duty was revealed at almost each page turn I had had this book set aside for almost four years It had been on my bookshelf since it was moved from out of my parent s home It was a couple of days before Father s Day th I found myself touched by several places in this book as it moved back and forth from the author s father who had served and now was dying and Brigadier General Paul Tibbits, Major Dutch Van Kirk, and Colonel Tom Ferebee who were the crew that flew the Enola Gay, as the idea of duty was revealed at almost each page turn I had had this book set aside for almost four years It had been on my bookshelf since it was moved from out of my parent s home It was a couple of days before Father s Day that I reached for it, and opening the front cover was surprised to read my hand written note to my dad who had passed way eight years before and who had also served, Happy Father s Day I love you very much 2000 I had forgotten that this book was a gift to him My dad showed up in a few of these pages throughout Duty, and I wished I had takentime to ask him questions about his service .Free Kindle ♰ Duty: A Father, His Son, and the Man Who Won T ♍ When Bob Greene went home to central Ohio to be with his dying father, it set off a chain of events that led him to knowing his dad in a way he never had before thanks to a quiet man who lived just a few miles away, a man who had changed the history of the worldGreene s father a soldier with an infantry division in World War II often spoke of seeing the man around town All but anonymous even in his own city, carefully maintaining his privacy, this man, Greene s father would point out to him, had won the war He was Paul Tibbets At the age of twenty nine, at the request of his country, Tibbets assembled a secret team of , American soldiers to carry out the single most violent act in the history of mankind InTibbets piloted a plane which he called Enola Gay, after his mother to the Japanese city of Hiroshima, where he dropped the atomic bombOn the morning after the last meal he ever ate with his father, Greene went to meet Tibbets What developed was an unlikely friendship that allowed Greene to discover things about his father, and his father s generation of soldiers, that he never fully understood before Duty is the story of three lives connected by history, proximity, and blood indeed, it is many stories, intimate and achingly personal as well as deeply historic In one soldier s memory of a mission that transformed the world and in a son s last attempt to grasp his father s ingrained sense of honor and duty lies a powerful tribute to the ordinary heroes of an extraordinary time in American lifeWhat Greene came away with is found history and found poetry a profoundly moving work that offers a vividly new perspective on responsibility, empathy, and love It is an exploration of and response to the concept of duty as it once was and always should be quiet and from the heart On every page you can hear the whisper of a generation and its children bidding each other farewell I wanted to read a book about Paul Tibbets so I grabbed this book I was disapointed at first when I realized the book was only half about Tibbets and half the book is about the authors father and his role in the war What was initially a disappointment turned out to make this a better story I loved both sotries and how they pieced together I m guilty of reading about the famous people from the war and forgetting that everybody who severed played their role. I love the values represented in this book Bob Greene is present in his hometown in Ohio as his father is dying, and while there he is able to strike up a friendship with Paul Tibbetts, who flew the Enola Gay which dropped the bomb on Hiroshima Tibbetts was a long time resident of Bexley, Ohio The words of his father, recorded for posterity non a series of audio tapes, echo the values held by Paul Tibbetts This is the greatest generation for sure. Eh I mean if you re into these sort of books, you d probably like it but I hated it It took forever to read and it was boring for me I m just not really into non fiction.