[[ Free Epub ]] ✔ Disobedience ✙ PDF eBook or Kindle ePUB free

Sometimes a book comes along that you just click with Sometimes you can t even fully explain why Its strange for me to favourite a book that I don t resonate with in some way but this book is just so well written, has such a soft, warm essence, and is such a pleasure to sink into Disobedience is an unexpected, yet delightful new friend I took my time with it and relished every page. [[ Free Epub ]] ⇨ Disobedience ⇝ A small, close knit Orthodox Jewish community in London is the setting for a revealing look at religion and sexuality in Alderman s frank yet heartfelt debut novel, Disobedience The story begins with the death of the community s esteemed rabbi, which sets in motion plans for a memorial service and the search for a replacement The rabbi s nephew and likely successor, Dovid, calls his cousin Ronit in New York to tell her that her father has died Ronit, who left the community long ago to build a life for herself as a career woman, returns home when she hears the news, and her reappearance exposes tears in the fabric of the communitySteeped in Jewish philosophy and teachings, Disobedience is a perceptive and thoughtful exploration of the laws and practices that have governed Judaism for centuries, and continue to hold sway today Throughout the novel, Alderman retells stories from the Torah Judaism s fundamental source and the interplay between these tales and the struggles of the novel s unique characters wields enormous power and wisdom, and will surely move readers to tears The only force that pushed me to read this book was the trailer of its film adaptation starring the two Rachels Weisz and McAdams Only having a vague idea that this included lesbianism one of my favourite topics in the Orthodox Jewish community deducing from the nicely made trailer I was surprised with how this came across as lesbophobic Sadly while I found the religious aspect strong and educational, even going at length to detail some Orthodox Jewish practices and beliefs and how th The only force that pushed me to read this book was the trailer of its film adaptation starring the two Rachels Weisz and McAdams Only having a vague idea that this included lesbianism one of my favourite topics in the Orthodox Jewish community deducing from the nicely made trailer I was surprised with how this came across as lesbophobic Sadly while I found the religious aspect strong and educational, even going at length to detail some Orthodox Jewish practices and beliefs and how these could be stifling and limiting to women so when one s identity sexuality is repressed , it fell short as a good lesbian representation It focused mostly on men and religious politics, particularly Dovid, and even when it talked about the nature of Esti and Ronit s relationship these women were still concerned about a certain man Talk about Bechdel fail One of the women s intention was also murky and ambiguous it was hard to believe how her character did a 360 degree turn near the end you d think love could be summoned just like that But I guess that was the point of this novel It was too convenient for everyone and the ending was an unacceptable, lazy clich How could view spoiler staying in a marriage with a man you don t love be freeing when you re already in the process of coming into terms with your orientation and you have options hide spoiler So much potential was lost there A happy ending was not necessary nor the view spoiler two female protagonists needed to end up together hide spoiler but to end it like that God it was actually insulting to meHonesty has its limits I guess do yourself a favour and watch the trailer instead The film itself seemed to be taking the opposite direction and I m cautiously glad This could be one of those rare situations where the film is better than the book and I sure hope it is.Edit, 20 03 2019 I have watched the film months back and I was pleasantly surprised because it was indeed better than the novel in my opinion Like the meme itself Rachel Weisz if you read this I m free on Thursday and would like to hang out Please respond to this and then hang out with me on Thursday when I m free Life in the orthodox jewish community in Hendon is directed by rules in every minute detail What to eat, how to prepare it, when to eat it, how to speak, when and to whom, whom to take by the hand, how to dress and many, manyWhatever you need, The Book has an answer to every conceivable question It explains why every believer needs it like water, why gossiping is forbidden, why certain things, like meat and milk, need to always be kept separate, why women are different from men, why mar Life in the orthodox jewish community in Hendon is directed by rules in every minute detail What to eat, how to prepare it, when to eat it, how to speak, when and to whom, whom to take by the hand, how to dress and many, manyWhatever you need, The Book has an answer to every conceivable question It explains why every believer needs it like water, why gossiping is forbidden, why certain things, like meat and milk, need to always be kept separate, why women are different from men, why marriage should not be expected to be simple and much, much.And yet, says rav Krushka s daughter Ronit, who now leaves in New YorkIt is difficult to work out a meaning of life in Hendon I mean, it s difficult to work out for yourself, rather then allowing other people to tell you Because in Hendon there are plenty of people just dying to explain the meaning of life to you I guess that s true in New York too, but in New York, everyone seems to disagree with everyone else about what the meaning of life is In Hendon, at least the Hendon I grew up in, everything faced in one direction, there was nowhere to get a grip You need that disagreement, we all do so that we can realize that the world isn t smooth and even, not everyone agrees with everyone else You need a widow into another world to work out what you think of your own Ronit didn t leave Hendon because she couldn t stand it, or because she didn t fit in Perhaps she did not fit in particularly well, but it was her father who sent her to NY to school So quite undramatically, once her own personal window was opened, she met new friends, then she adopted new ways and without any major conflict she just never came back.When she did come back, for her fathers funeral, she found Hendon just as she left it slow, TRADITIONAL, UNCHANGING.For Ronit, who during her absence joined the 21st century with all its modernity for good and for bad, it is suffocating, and she is itching to provoke and show people how wrong and backwards their way of life is So she sets of to once again show her disobedience Events show though, that leaving the community and blank disobedience is not for everyone, Her childhood friends chose another way that takes compromise and sacrifices.The homogeneous Hendon perhaps is not that homogeneous Ronit learns a lesson, and so do I life requires choices and the most dramatic ones are not always the best ones I have my share of experience with traditional society, not jewish orthodox but traditional enough to rebel Having passed half a century, I have reasons enough to question the mutiny of my young age, and give the abandoned rules a benefit of a doubt Perhaps that s why this this book speaks to me so strongly Very thought worthy and it only proves that lessons in life can be found in most unexpected places For the most part I enjoyed reading Disobedience, but it s one of those books that s somehow greater than the sum of its parts I was having a hard time putting my finger on what exactly was working for me about this, because when I started to pick it apart, I realized there wasn t a whole lot to praise It wasn t the writing, certainly, which I found rather sophomoricon that in a minute it wasn t the plot, which was quite paint by numbers and it wasn t the characters, who were pretty For the most part I enjoyed reading Disobedience, but it s one of those books that s somehow greater than the sum of its parts I was having a hard time putting my finger on what exactly was working for me about this, because when I started to pick it apart, I realized there wasn t a whole lot to praise It wasn t the writing, certainly, which I found rather sophomoricon that in a minute it wasn t the plot, which was quite paint by numbers and it wasn t the characters, who were pretty flat archetypes and essentially just mouthpieces for Alderman s ideas, completely with stilted dialogue that doesn t even begin to resemble how real human beings converse But it was something, I guess, because it had a very readable quality to it and I certainly wouldn t dissuade others from checking it out.I think if I had to choose the one thing that really stood out to me about this novel, it was the setting It takes place in an Orthodox Jewish community in London, and focuses on the romance between Ronit the rebellious, wayward daughter of a renowned Rabbi who s recently died and Esti the submissive, conservative housewife who s miserable from deeply internalizing religious doctrine While neither of these characters felt as fleshed out as they could be, what did feel very rich and textured for me was each of their relationships with Judaism this community did feel very real to me and the sermons which began each chapter were an effective tool for immersing the reader in these characters ideologies.I haven t yet read Alderman s Women s Prize winning novel The Power, which received a lot of critical praise but which is not particularly adored among my circle of reader friends I still intend to read The Power, but if the writing style is anything like it was in Disobedience, I think I m beginning to understand the criticism There were some individual sentences in here which I highlighted because I thought they were striking, but there were evenwhich caused me to roll my eyes, if only because Alderman has a habit of repeating the same words and phrases and ideas ad nauseum On a sentence by sentence example, let s take this Far away, very very far away, I made a sleek black telephone on a pale wood desk ringI thought okay, that s an interesting way to describe making a phone call But then Alderman does the exact same thing againI dialed the number and, a quarter of the way across the world, I made a British number appear on a black telephone on a blond wood desk This whole book had a circuitous nature to it, where it felt like Alderman was taking the longest possible way to make a simple point On thethematic level, we re frankly bashed over the head with Alderman s pontifications on man s capacity for disobedience, and the societal expectation of silencing women It s not that I disagree with anything that she s saying in fact, several of these points I did find rather stimulating to mull over but when you use the word silence a grand total of sixty six times in your novel, maybe you should consider that you re laying it on a bit heavy.And then there s the ending admittedly this critique is tied up inextricably in my personal preferences, but if there s one kind of ending I cannot stand, especially in literary fiction, it s when everything is wrapped up neatly in a nice bow all conflicts resolved and all character arcs completed I think there s something so dissatisfying about following characters on a journey through a novel and essentially being told their story ends here, no need to think about this any further, everything s fine at the end I can t tell you how much I hate that Coupled with the downright corny resolution, I did not finish Disobedience on a high.So, I don t know It started around 4 stars for me, dropped to 3 stars somewhere in the middle when the repetition got to be a bit much, and ended up around 2 because of how much I hated the ending But I didn t hate this book, I just didn t think it lived up to its potential Solidly 2.5 for me I may reevaluate and change to 3 later Ronit, estranged daughter of a famous London Rabbi, returns to her childhood home after the death of her father This Jewish Orthodox community looks at her with suspicion and curiosity Ronit is everything that the women in the community aren t supposed to be She s independent, she hasn t married and probably doesn t want to, she doesn t observe the Shabbat, she eats non kosher food Oh, and she s loud She doesn t keep silent Every day, every moment, she tries to be the opposite of what she Ronit, estranged daughter of a famous London Rabbi, returns to her childhood home after the death of her father This Jewish Orthodox community looks at her with suspicion and curiosity Ronit is everything that the women in the community aren t supposed to be She s independent, she hasn t married and probably doesn t want to, she doesn t observe the Shabbat, she eats non kosher food Oh, and she s loud She doesn t keep silent Every day, every moment, she tries to be the opposite of what she was raised to be Her return to London, however, puts her face to face with circumstances she would rather forget A complicated relationship with her dead father and everything he stood for, a former relationship with a girlfriend, who is now married to Ronit s cousin and, of course, the narrow mindedness of some of the community s members However, throughout her stay in London, Ronit learns to see new aspects of her identity, and she changes, also changing the life of Esti and Dovid her ex girlfriend and her respective husband Ronit learns the importance of silence as Esti learns the importance of speaking out Some reviewers say this book wouldn t pass the Bechdel test which is quite frankly absurd The female characters are very well written, existing and having thoughts of their own, and Dovid is a great, great male character The fact that Alderman chose not to turn him into a model of toxic masculinity and misogyny is a brave decision because it would be so much easier and lazier to turn him into that But no, Dovid is a loving, kind man, and the reader feels that there s no one to blame for the situation they were placed in The problem is that this isn t a book about queer people The fact that Esti is a lesbian and Ronit is bisexual is peripheral to the plot This is a book about faith and religion and what it is to be Jewish Even the chapters are structured as a commentary on passages from the Torah and the Talmud So if you re coming into this book to read a LGBTQ story you re going to be disappointed as clearly some reviewers were I understand that the ending might rattle some people The fact that Esti chooses to ignore her sexuality to stay with Dovid is not very in tune with the kind of liberation one wants from LGBTQ literature But again, this book is muchabout religion and its links to a community, the individual inside a group, the sublimation of the individual to the demands of the spiritual and the choice between identities Ronit and Esti make the choices they can live with Ronit could not live as an orthodox Jewish woman so she leaves, and Esti couldn t live openly as a lesbian inside her community, but she doesn t want to leave because her spirituality and her relationship with God are extremely important to her, and directly linked to that same community Alderman writes this story with enormous compassion and understanding It would be easy to portray all this as a black and white guide to intolerance, but thankfully she avoids those clich s, and instead introduces subtlety to what could ve been a much boring story otherwise Interesting and some of the parts are certainly thought provoking, but overall Alderman s writing just doesn t agree with me I loved the exploration of some of the customs in that particular conservative Jewish community that the story is set in I loved the juxtaposition of Ronit s thoughts on her own life, which is messy but in which she is herself, and Ronit s former life, which seemed to be dominated by conformity and submission It s difficult to work out the meaning of life in Hendon I m Interesting and some of the parts are certainly thought provoking, but overall Alderman s writing just doesn t agree with me I loved the exploration of some of the customs in that particular conservative Jewish community that the story is set in I loved the juxtaposition of Ronit s thoughts on her own life, which is messy but in which she is herself, and Ronit s former life, which seemed to be dominated by conformity and submission It s difficult to work out the meaning of life in Hendon I mean, it s difficult to work it out for yourself, rather than allowing other people to tell you Because in Hendon there are plenty of people just dying to explain the meaning of life to you I guess that s true in New York too, but in New York everyone seems to disagree with everyone else about what the meaning of life is In Hendon, at least the Hendon I grew up in, everything faced in one direction, there was nowhere to get a grip You need that disagreement, we all do, so that we can realize that the world isn t smooth and even, not everyone agrees with everyone else You need a window into another world to work out what you think of your own.However, I also felt as if this juxtaposition was a form of manipulation as the portrayal of Ronit s defiance against her former community didn t consider any other approaches to religion that Ronit may have experienced when moving to New York, and in turn this seemed to create a kind of me v them mentality that just doesn t seem plausible.I mean, I would have understood if her experience growing up had turned Ronit against all religion for example, but it didn t Instead, her wrath is personal to the very community she grew up in and which she is visiting when her estranged father passes away The way it comes across in the book, however, is not personal It comes across as if the particular community was a generalised representation of all practitioners, and Ronit s vengeance was directed against all The fact that some of the main characters at the receiving end of Ronit s scorn are portrayed as stereotypes does not help I have no doubt that such people exist, as they do in all sections of society, but in the context of the book this works against the quality of the book There are some truly lovely scenes and characters Ronit, Dovid, Esti, the Goldfarbs, but to focus the frustration, loathing, and defiance of Ronit, Dovid, and Esti on the characters that seem like stereotypes just createsstereotypes, and this is never a good move in my reading It just cheapens the bookI thought I had come to all sorts of decisions about what I believe That it is better for things to be said than remain unsaid That I have nothing to be ashamed about That those who live narrow lives have only themselves to blame when they find themselves shocked As it turns out, I don t seem to have got what Scott would call total buy in from all levels of my brain on those principles I thought I should phone Dr Feingold, just to let her know that nothing had been resolved even after all this time Because I did feel it Shame They re not bad people None of them are Well, maybe the Hartogs But the Goldfarbs aren t bad people They re not cruel or unpleasant or malicious They didn t deserve to have their peaceful Friday night dinner overturned They didn t deserve me smashing my life straight into theirs It can t have been right that I did And if I hadn t Yeah, that wouldn t have been right either This is the second of Alderman s books that I ve read, and although my issues with this one are different from the ones I had with The Power, there is something in Alderman s writing that yells at me I m pushing an agenda here that I just cannot help but cringe at Btw, this the original cover is a much better fit than the current movie tie in cover Also, btw, even though the book was disappointing, I cannot see that the good parts would have been communicated well in the film I m curious enough to find out, but I have a feeling that the film s focus will be on affair between Ronit and Esti, not about the issue of breaking with tradition and being outcast from a community, and the changes that can be brought about by a simple application of empathy 3.5 5 I hadn t heard of this book, which was first published in 2006, until I saw a movie trailer in the theater for the motion picture version I m always curious to read books about people who were once part of strict or fundamentalist religious groups and who leave those groups to live outside the bounds of that strict group And this book does offer one such character Ronit, who is the daughter and only child of the great Rav lead Rabbi of their synagogue in her closely knit north London 3.5 5 I hadn t heard of this book, which was first published in 2006, until I saw a movie trailer in the theater for the motion picture version I m always curious to read books about people who were once part of strict or fundamentalist religious groups and who leave those groups to live outside the bounds of that strict group And this book does offer one such character Ronit, who is the daughter and only child of the great Rav lead Rabbi of their synagogue in her closely knit north London ultra orthodox community Ronit s thirty two years old now, having left years ago and moved to New York City, where she supports herself and, when the book begins, she is having an affair with a married man with whom she shares an office at work Word of her father s death reaches her, and she travels back to London to attend services for her father and to find the silver candlesticks that had belonged to her dead mother.But there are three protagonists in this novel In addition to Ronit, there is Dovid, who is Ronit s cousin, who has been studying with her father since he was thirteen so that some day he may become the Rav for their synagogue Dovid was chosen because the Rav has no sons daughters do not count when it comes to studying and becoming rabbis He met with seven of his nephews when they were young, and he chose Dovid And the third protagonist is Esti, who was a friend of Ronit s when they were teenagers The two girls had been involved in a hidden lesbian affair During the last decade or so, Ronit has not kept in touch with her London friends or family The orthodox community where this all takes place has scorned her for her rejection of their community The community is very much a fourth character in the novel.When Ronit returns to London from New York after her father s death, she finds that Dovid and Esti are now married to each other Dovid is going through his own crisis as he is being pushed to become the next Rav, and he is not 100% sure that he is the best candidate for the job At the same time the two women have to decide what to make of their changed statuses in life After reading the book, I did go and see the movie, which is well made and interesting, but it s tonally different from the book I preferred the book because of the amount of attention it placed on Dovid He s almost a side feature in the movie because the movie focuses on dealing with the not quite dead embers of Ronit and Esti s long ago affair But Dovid s challenges are easily as interesting as the women s, and the three of them together find a way to deal with their situation And there are all the many interactions among the members of the community about the nature of their connection to the one living child of their beloved Rav and about the future of their synagogue Author Alderman respects all the characters, and she includes a clear as well as respectful view of the orthodox community and its religious practices Really enjoyable read touching very sensitive matters First fiction book I ever read about orthodox jews Expected a love story, but got way muchIt was very interesting to read about orthodox rituals and some beliefs, as I am very interested in all kinds of radical religions and cults It is a story about freedom about how difficult is to live when everything is decided for you Where only expectation from a woman is to be fruitful and stay silent Beautiful style and a bit if sarcasm H Really enjoyable read touching very sensitive matters First fiction book I ever read about orthodox jews Expected a love story, but got way muchIt was very interesting to read about orthodox rituals and some beliefs, as I am very interested in all kinds of radical religions and cults It is a story about freedom about how difficult is to live when everything is decided for you Where only expectation from a woman is to be fruitful and stay silent Beautiful style and a bit if sarcasm Highly recommend Can t wait to watch a film Well written Wouldn t exactly say it s queer friendly