!DOWNLOAD EPUB ♾ De gave van Hanna Mendel ♵ PDF or E-pub free

!DOWNLOAD EPUB ⚇ De gave van Hanna Mendel ⚔ Hanna speelt de sterren van de hemel Maar redt het ook haar levenDe Hongaarse Hanna Mendel heeft een droom Ze wil net zo n beroemde pianiste worden als Clara Schumann Haar toelatingsbewijs voor het conservatorium belooft in ieder geval een mooie toekomst Maar op een dag wordt haar getto leeggeruimd en moet ze op transport naar Auschwitz, samen met haar familieIn het kamp blijft haar talent niet onopgemerkt Ze wordt gesommeerd op auditie te komen bij de sadistische kampcommandant haar pianospel betovert hem Vanaf dat moment wordt ze elke dag in zijn huis verwacht en moet ze naar believen voor hem spelen Soms de hele dag, soms helemaal niet, omdat zijn hoofd er niet naar staat Elke dag is er de angst dat ze een faux pas maakt Als ze verliefd wordt op de zoon van de kampcommandant wordt haar leven nog gecompliceerder kan dat eigenlijk wel, verliefd zijn op de vijand When I read a book about the Holocaust or other terrible parts of history my favorite part is almost always the middle, the messy, heartbreaking point when the plot is at its peak At the heart of the story, the protagonist sees the most horrifying yet captivating details and is far from the tranquility of before and the relief of after I do enjoy watching the exposition shatter as characters are captured and seeing them weave their lives back together in the conclusion, but I always strugg When I read a book about the Holocaust or other terrible parts of history my favorite part is almost always the middle, the messy, heartbreaking point when the plot is at its peak At the heart of the story, the protagonist sees the most horrifying yet captivating details and is far from the tranquility of before and the relief of after I do enjoy watching the exposition shatter as characters are captured and seeing them weave their lives back together in the conclusion, but I always struggle to turn away from the horrors of the story s center However, this was not the case with Playing for the Commandant while I appreciated its every chapter, my favorite parts spanned the first and last 50 pages.I fell in love with this story s exposition for its masterful portrayal of the protagonist s ignorance At the start of the story, when Hanna and her family are forced to leave their home in their sealed ghetto, she does not guess at the severity of the situation Even upon arriving at Auschwitz Birkenau, Hanna still does not grasp the full scope of the evil surrounding her for example, when she sees people sent toward buildings seeping smoke, she assumes they are being sent to work in factories This dark dramatic irony, knowing that Hanna s life is about to become farpainful than she expects, makes readers ache for her and makes the first few chapters a gripping opener.Her innocence and hope carries her all the way until the end, when it cracks in a conclusion that can only be called explosive I do not want to give too much away, but I will say that the ending displays a calculated imperfection, happy enough to be optimistic, but sad enough to be realistic Suzy Zail chose a spot on ending for her story, and I would not change a thing about it.The only segment in which I would make small alterations is the middle, the section that has always been my favorite It does not have any major flaws, but something small is missing, something keeping me from becoming fully immersed in the story Perhaps it was the book s length at 245 pages, it has little room for fleshing out dramatic details, so the plot often skims over months in a matter of sentences Or perhaps it was the slightly too modern dialogue that springs up occasionally, pulling readers out of the historical setting Whatever it was, I never felt truly absorbed in the story, as if I were there with the characters.However, I cannot hold this flaw against Playing for the Commandant Despite my inability to fall into the story completely, the plot still holds enough shocks and emotions to keep any reader invested I highly recommend this novel to any historical fiction fans, and I hope thatof Zail s Australian writing soon makes its way to America.This review originally appeared at www.litup review.com Hanna Mendel has a dream to follow in the footsteps of her musical muse, Clara Schumann, the celebrated German pianist Hanna is only fifteen, and already her musical talents have seen her debut at the Debrecen Town Hall and play at the Goldmark Hall By eighteen, Hanna hopes to shadow Clara and be playing to sell out crowds in Viennathen Hitler and the war came to Hungary, and everything changed.Hanna and her family have been living in a ghetto sectioned off with other Juden Jews , and Hanna Mendel has a dream to follow in the footsteps of her musical muse, Clara Schumann, the celebrated German pianist Hanna is only fifteen, and already her musical talents have seen her debut at the Debrecen Town Hall and play at the Goldmark Hall By eighteen, Hanna hopes to shadow Clara and be playing to sell out crowds in Viennathen Hitler and the war came to Hungary, and everything changed.Hanna and her family have been living in a ghetto sectioned off with other Juden Jews , and slowly their world began to alter Her non Jewish friends stopped talking to her at school Her father, a talented watch maker, had his business close down The Mendel family have tried to cope in these trying times of war Hanna, her father, mother and older sister, Erika all living day to day within the confines of the ghetto These are difficult times to be Jew, but so long as the family has each other, they should be fine.One night the ghetto is evacuated Everyone is told to pack a bag and enough food to last three days The Jews are being taken to a work camp Hanna and her family leave their apartment, their valuables and small mementos behind save for a C sharp black key from Hanna s beloved piano They will be there when they come back, when this war endsBut no one is prepared for the journey before them.All the Jews are herded into cattle trains made to stand for days on end while the train clambers along the countryside, taking them to Poland and Auschwitz Birkenau.At Auschwitz Hanna, Erika and their mother are separated from their father with a flick of his cane, Josef Mengele sends healthy workers to the right, while the children, elderly and infirm are sent to the left and never seen again The women are stripped, shaved and tattooed Hanna is now A10573, and put to work in the quarry like everyone else But it quickly becomes apparent that the Auschwitz slogan Arbeit macht frei work sets you free is a cruel taunt Everyone works for mouldy bread and muddied water Block leaders whip and beat the women if they so much as look at them the wrong wayAuschwitz is no work camp, Hanna decides, rather it is a place of death.And then a miracle Auschwitz commandant, Captain Jager, needs a pianist He will be holding an audition for one girl to be his entertainment when he wines and dines guests This is a mixed blessing the lucky pianist will be alone in Jager s home and able to steal scraps of food and have a respite from the back breaking quarry work But Jager s last pianist lost a finger when she hit the wrong key, and to be caught stealing means a bullet to the head.Hanna is successful and wins the audition and it is in Jager s house, playing for his SS officer friends, that Hanna first sees Karl, Jager s son What starts as contempt for the beautiful boy turns into something , something dangerous and forbidden The Wrong Boy is the new young adult novel from Australian author Suzy Zail I first heard about Suzy Zail s novel from Adele, of Persnickety Snark fame Then I was told that Ms Zail had attended the same RMIT Writing Editing course as me, and that a couple of my friends were mentioned in her Acknowledgements So, long before I actually read the book, I was excited for all the whispers of brilliance, and because the blurb was thoroughly intriguing And now that I have devoured the novel, I must say that all the advance praise is utterly deserved The Wrong Boy is a beautifully crushing read, and I hope it gets nominated for a few young adult literary awards in 2012.From 1933 to 1945, six million Jews were killed in the Holocaust though this is a rough estimate, since it s impossible to precisely know the extent of the slaughter Of the six million, it is again roughly estimated that 450,000 Hungarian Jews perished And in Auschwitz Birkenau concentration camp alone, over one million Jews were murdered Suzy Zail s story is somewhat inspired by her father who, she explains in her author s note, was sent to Auschwitz when he was just thirteen years old She has previously written a book about how her father survived the Holocaust, titled The Tattooed Flower , but The Wrong Boy is a work of fictionbased around a tragic and dark moment in human history The Wrong Boy is a tough read, and so it should be Many times I had to put the book down, unable to read through my tears But by the last page I was ready to sell this novel on street corners I m already imploring friends to borrow my copy, and I intend to tell my aunt to recommend the book to her students she is of Austrian descent, and a German language teacher at a Melbourne high school This novel left me raw, but I m bloody glad I read it.Through Hanna s eyes, Suzy Zail explores all aspects of the Holocaust We learn of the slow unfolding before the war, when Jews were ghettoized and made to live with their own kind Hanna speaks about the non Jewish friends who abandoned her, the neighbours who turned a blind eye At Auschwitz, Zail delves into the little discussed politics within the concentration camp and barracks hierarchy Block leaders were assigned to keep people in check Jewish women who were also prisoners, but ranked above the rest and often with a coloured patch on their uniforms, identifying them as murderers When Hanna is assigned as Captain Jager s pianist, she and her family experience derision from their barrack mates, who believe Hanna is like those women in the camp who spread their legs for the soldiers.Throughout the novel Hanna is seemingly in two worlds within the camp she witnesses the horrors and injustices women picked off one by one when they don t pass the morning fitness test, and the way that they eventually turn on one another for a scrap of bread or a dead woman s shoes And then she ventures into Captain Jager s luxurious home, where she is made to play Mozart and Wagner, making herself sick as she entertains his uniformed friends I closed my eyes and tried to slip inside the music but I couldn t get in I squeezed my eyes shut but it was still there, an image flickering against the backs of my eyelids a man with silver hair bent over a dead body, prying open lips and pulling at gold teeth I opened my eyes and stared at keys, but no matter how hard I tried I couldn t force my way in I stared at the notes dancing across the page and felt sick Playing in Jager s home means Hanna also comes into contact with his beautiful son, Karl The boy will not meet Hanna s eyes, and she is convinced that she disgusts him the dirty Jew in his home But the months pass with requiems, Chopin, Beethoven and the Moonlight Sonataand Hanna begins to see Karl in a new light, even if he is the wrong boy for her.The romance in Zail s novel is complex and sure to keep the reader on edge, but is really second tier to the politics and sadness within Auschwitz Zail writes about life in the concentration camp with striking clarity and ruthlessness and these scenes within the camp s walls are utterly harrowing Because The Wrong Boy is set in Auschwitz, Zail writes about real figures of the Holocaust and Nazi party Josef Mengele, for example, assumes his role as the Angel of Death , the camp s man with the cane who chose who lived and who died Zail also touches on Mengele s role as camp doctor, when Hanna s hometown friends, twin girls, are hand picked by Mengele and taken from the barracks Hanna is a brilliant heroine Throughout the book she sways between terror, anger and profound sadness but her determination is constant She simply will not succumb to death in this putrid camp, and she will do anything to help her family survive with her She is an inspiring heroine, and an utterly compelling narrator.I don t want to give anything away about the ending, particularly concerning who lives and dies But I really liked that at the end, Zail touches on yet another aspect of the Holocaust the return Those Jewish survivors who returned to their homes across Europe, only to find they no longer existed In the aftermath of liberation there are rumours of Jews fleeing to Palestine, where they intend to build an army Other Jews are talking about finding solace in Australia as far away from Europe as they can get This is a whole other facet to the Holocaust, and just as interesting, so I fully intend to read Zail s The Tattooed Flower to getinsight into this aftermath.I am fascinated by history, always have been I remember reading The Diary of Anne Frank in year six and being crushed by the book s epilogue, which described Anne s death from typhus in a concentration camp Going into high school and finally learning about the ideologies that led to The Holocaust was both interesting, and disheartening That people can be swayed to violence and inhumanity by nothing but madness and prejudiceit s sickening Evenso when you see picture evidence of the suffering skeletal people in rags and shaved heads, looking like ghosts as they stare out of black and white photos And those photos of bodies piled like mountains, discarded and buried en masse It doesn t matter how many documentaries I watch, or history books I read seeing photos of the concentration camps, those faces and inhuman bodies absolutely floors me I don t want to believe that human beings can be so cruel to one another But we can The young adult genre seems to produce some wonderfully complex and important fiction books about the Holocaust Morris Gleitzman s Once series, The Boy in the Striped Pajamas by John Boyne, and of course certain nominees in the Sydney Taylor Book Awards for Older Readers and Teen Readers books that exemplify the highest literary standards while authentically portraying the Jewish experience The Wrong Boy is vital reading, another harrowing but important fictionalized account of the darkest period of human history I hope that Zail s novel gets put up for a few literary awards this year The Wrong Boy is a book that, anyone who reads it will be moved, and enraged by the history and truth within its pages.Detailed review with photos here Can I just start with saying this book deserves so manystars than 5, Seriously If you want to read a world war 2 story, I would highly recommend you this book This book has a place in my heart and I want to reread this book already You follow the story of Hanna who plays the piano, I play the piano as well so that was already a good start for me This book was full of emotions Angry, sadness, happyness, revenge, hurt, scared, optimistic, pessimistic Every emotion a person can feel is p Can I just start with saying this book deserves so manystars than 5, Seriously If you want to read a world war 2 story, I would highly recommend you this book This book has a place in my heart and I want to reread this book already You follow the story of Hanna who plays the piano, I play the piano as well so that was already a good start for me This book was full of emotions Angry, sadness, happyness, revenge, hurt, scared, optimistic, pessimistic Every emotion a person can feel is present and also the lack of feelings a person can have you find in this book It was hard and beautiful at the same time I loved the relationships growth so much, between Hanna and her sister, Hanna and the Barrack leader, Hanna and Karl, Hanna and Vera, Hanna and her parents How these relations changed through the story was magnificent if you ask me And that ending omg that ending That was a terrible but ending, although it couldn t have had a better ending at the same time What better way to finish this review by saying one thing C sharp This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers To view it, click here Although I found this book enjoyable it did have many lose ends that at the end of the book were left untied You grew strong relations with the characters but at the end of the story I felt like the reader should be leftinformed about what was going to happen to the girls with both the lover and the parents presumed dead It would not have hurt to leave them some kind of fortune, money, family, a future It made the book very gloomy especially with the author constantly hinting that all Although I found this book enjoyable it did have many lose ends that at the end of the book were left untied You grew strong relations with the characters but at the end of the story I felt like the reader should be leftinformed about what was going to happen to the girls with both the lover and the parents presumed dead It would not have hurt to leave them some kind of fortune, money, family, a future It made the book very gloomy especially with the author constantly hinting that all would soon be better Also the action got tiring there would be a cliffhanger after every chapter and would often not even be resolved or mentioned in the following chapters Finally I thought that although the main character was suppose to be 16 at times she sounded very young maybe even 12 years old She kept on referring to be so bright for her age but it seemed as if she was not as intelligent as it may seem.All in All I gave this book 3 stars as it was hard to put down and generally enjoyable although I found the ending annoying I wanted to like this book so badly, but I just couldn t It was supposed to be a story about how a Jewish girl falls in love for the wrong boy, the German son of the camp commander Hanna, a fifteen years old Jewish girl who lovesthan anything else to play the piano, is sent, along with her family, to Auschwitz When they first arrived there, they have been separated from their father and as her mom slowly goes insane, Hanna turns to her older sister Erika, for support They need each oth I wanted to like this book so badly, but I just couldn t It was supposed to be a story about how a Jewish girl falls in love for the wrong boy, the German son of the camp commander Hanna, a fifteen years old Jewish girl who lovesthan anything else to play the piano, is sent, along with her family, to Auschwitz When they first arrived there, they have been separated from their father and as her mom slowly goes insane, Hanna turns to her older sister Erika, for support They need each other to survive To keep on hoping Erika might as well be the only reason why Hanna keeps holding on Erika, with her passion for photography, with her fighting spirit, is a strong young woman seeking for freedom When she first got into Auschwitz, she was the strongest one in the family The one still standing, not losing hope She was the strong one, the wild one The one who wasangry than afraid However, slowly the anger started to abandon her Fear started to get to her Therefore, Hanna is now trying to be the strong one With her blind optimism, she s trying to give back to her sister the hope she has lost One day Hanna is asked to start working for the commander of the camp thanks to her greatest passion music In fact, she starts playing the piano for him She hates to work for the people that ruined her life and everybody else s in the camp but thanks to this new job, she hasfood to share with her sister and warm close to get through winter with She makes new friends and new enemies Thanks to her new job, she also gets the chance to meet Karl, the camp commander s son At first, she thinks he hates her, she thinks that he s no better than his father But then they get the chance to spendtime together and she starts to realize that she was wrong That Karl was nothing like his father And, even though she knows she shouldn t, she knows it s wrong, she slowly starts to fall for the wrong boy I loved the idea of this book I loved the forbidden love element And I loved the fact that this was a new,original, story about Auschwitz I read a lot of stories about life if you can call it that during the World War II but never have I read about a Jewish girl that falls in love with a German, son of a camp commander I really hoped this story would have been great but it rather disappointed me I was hoping for a desperate passionate heart breaking forbidden love story but even though there were all the elements, it just seemed too shallow to me I found the book too plain, stereotyped especially the love story I wantedI wanted to knowabout Erika, I wanted to knowabout Karl I wanteddetails More romance A breath taking love story Not love at first sight In my opinion this would be a fantastic way to introduce younger people to the topic of the holocaust Sad but with happy, hope filled moments as well Not overly graphic while also addressing the horrors that went on.It doesn t romanticise them through avoidance. I feel rather deceived with that synopsis, since the romance is everything but the theme of this book. Holocaust books always make me want to cry And yet I persist reading them Why Because they re history Because history shouldn t be forgotten Because terrible things have happened and shouldn t ever happen again The author said this in her author s note at the back I don t pretend to know how it felt to be imprisoned in Birkenau I don t think anyone who wasn t there can ever really understand But it s important to try Reading history books and memoirs, talking about the Holocaust and w Holocaust books always make me want to cry And yet I persist reading them Why Because they re history Because history shouldn t be forgotten Because terrible things have happened and shouldn t ever happen again The author said this in her author s note at the back I don t pretend to know how it felt to be imprisoned in Birkenau I don t think anyone who wasn t there can ever really understand But it s important to try Reading history books and memoirs, talking about the Holocaust and writing about it is the best way to stop it from happening again The Wrong Boy is a beautifully written novel It s filled with music and sadness and an accidental love It s filled with the horrors of what happened to the millions of Jews that were imprisoned in war camps not to work , as everyone thought, but to be killed It s about Hanna, who plays piano One day, she would have been a famous pianist But Hitler destroyed her family, her world, her life This is her story The author has a clear voice While the voice of the novel isn t bursting with extreme emotion, the plot, characters and dialogue come across with striking power and clarity The description is perfect not too much, not too little Of course being a pianist myself I love the musical angle I love how Hanna carried a C sharp note which she pried from her piano at home before being sent to the prison camp and her sister took photos and hid the film So people would know what Hilter did to them I love the strong family bond touches The author brought you into her world with a flick of a word and, when Hanna sits at the piano in the Commandant s house, to play or die, I can see her agony The novel is very historically correct The little details, added in without huge emphasis, really make this story It has so many layers love, horror, war, fear, escape, pride The themes are woven in and out without preaching or pointing fingers And the twists They re perfect There are places to cry and laugh and sneer and screech and cringe and feel so overwrought with the horror of the Holocaust That saying, the detail isn t extreme It s written simply, but the description is definitely there, gritty and horrible alright It s just not written overpowering and grotesque The author managed to say so much by saying just a little That is a quality I stand in pure awe of.My only question came in relation to the dialogue I m all for historical books not being written in a dry, no contractions anywhere, very correct voice I don t mind it, but I do like the lighter,relatable dialogue mimicking though not extremely so how we speak today The Wrong Boy had a nice balance But there were times when I think the author veered too modern Erika Hanna s older sister says, Screw you, Hitler And there are a few other references like that With the rest of the book being so historically sound, I think that detracted from it The love story half is sad and sweet and doomed Not overdone Not underdone Karl the German Commandant s son is every bit the gallant young man, trapped by a father and people that he doesn t agree with He sees everything He does everything While Hanna sees him as indifferent, shy, and moody at first, everything changes when she realizes he cares about Jews He knows them by name He saves her life a few times when she makes some dire mistakes on the piano and gradually the start to fall in love It s so sad Right from the beginning While this story didn t leave me as haunted thank goodness as The Boy in the Striped Pajamas, it is definitely a tale to be remembered Sad Sombre Sweet Cruel Truth In spring 1944, Hungary was occupied by German soldiers and in the city of Debrecen, a ghetto was formed at the end of April Thinking her family was lucky because their apartment fell within the walls of the ghetto, Hanna Mendel continued to believe she would be able to attend Budapest Conservatorium of Music, where she had just been selected for a hard won place as a piano student.But in the middle of a night in June 1944, a knock on the door by officers informed them that the Mendel family, p In spring 1944, Hungary was occupied by German soldiers and in the city of Debrecen, a ghetto was formed at the end of April Thinking her family was lucky because their apartment fell within the walls of the ghetto, Hanna Mendel continued to believe she would be able to attend Budapest Conservatorium of Music, where she had just been selected for a hard won place as a piano student.But in the middle of a night in June 1944, a knock on the door by officers informed them that the Mendel family, parents, high spirited, defiant older sister Erika and Hanna, 15, was ordered to assemble outside the synagogue at 8 the next morning Before leaving, Hanna rips the C sharp from her beloved piano and takes it with her The next morning the Mendels, along with all of Debrecen s Jews, begin their long trip to Auschwitz Birkenau Concentration Camp.Once they arrive at Auschwitz, the family is split up, but luckily Hanna, Erika and their mother are able to stay together in the same barrack, even sharing a bunk Put to work in the quarry, one day Hanna sees her music teacher playing piano with an ensemble made of up inmates and called the Birkenau Women s Orchestra Piri thinks that maybe she can get Hanna a place in it.When that doesn t work out, Hanna is sent to audition with five other inmates for the camp s cruel commandant Believing she doesn t stand a chance at being chosen, the commandant leave the choice to his totally disinterested son, Karl Jager, who points to Hanna.Day after day, Hanna trudges to the commandant s house to await the order to play for him and any guests he may have The only perks to playing for the commandant is a warm shower everyday the commandant detests dirt , shoes, a warm coat and a warm house while she s there The only extra food is leftovers she must steal and risk getting caught and shot.Gradually, however, she discovers that Karl Jager harbors his own dangerous secrets and is not as disinterested or as indifferent as she originally thought When he treats her kindly, Hanna finds herselfandattracted to him But returning to the barrack at the end of each day, she sees that her mother and Erika are cold, starving and barely surviving To make matters worse, her mother, who had started going mad during the roundup in Debrecen, is havingandtrouble surviving the selections each time they are done Their one hope is that the Red Army is really moving east as rud around the camp and that they arrive in time Playing for the Commandant is certainly a very readable book I read it in one day It is told in the first person by Hanna, a very observant 15 year old and on many levels her voice rings true Her descriptions of the camp, of the cruelty inflicted on innocent people are spot on When she talks about the lice, the smells, the moldy bread or about how skeleton thin her sister and the other women are becoming, you can clearly see and smell what she is describing.Despite everything, Hanna a father had told her to survive at any cost to tell the world what happened to the Jews of Europe and so, she is determined to do what her father wanted.But when she talks about the danger of stealing scraps of leftover food, or of living under the pressure of always having to please the commandant, Hanna s fate feels just as capricious or dangerous as her fellow inmates For example, when the gardener, a Jew, steps on the grave of the commandant s dog, he is shot in the head for it But, when a girl at the commandant s house drops a tray with tea and cakes on it, I thought for sure that when she is removed from the house, she is also killed, but she shows up later, and I have to admit, I was surprised to see her again in the novel But, Hanna s growing romance with Karl is very most disturbing and a real flaw in the novel I guess I thought Hanna should be thinkingabout food than a boy She didn t get that muchto eat than her sister, and what she got, she shared with Erika Also, at one point, Hanna gets angry at the people, ordinary farmers, who watch her walk to and from the commandant s house every day and do nothing I got mad at Karl for being against what the Nazis were doing to the Jews, but who passively sits by and watches it all happen I would be curious to know how others feel about this part of an otherwise good novel Yet, despite this criticism, in the end, I thought that Playing for the Commandant is definitely worth reading for its message of survival and hope, but not for its gratuitous romance.This book is recommended for readers age 12 This was an EARC received from NetGalleyThis review was originally posted at The Children s War