#FREE BOOK ⚽ Dark Tide: The Great Boston Molasses Flood of 1919 Ü eBook or E-pub free

I absolutely loved this book What struck me most was the fact that Stephen Puleo gave the molasses flood a number of human faces The majority of the book is narrative by and about the people involved in the flood The rest of the book is a chronicle of the time period A huge part of this book is about showing the world of the mid 1910s and into the twenties, spanning the anarchist and labor movements, World War I, the rise of big business, and prohibition Many of the quotes in Dark Tide reso I absolutely loved this book What struck me most was the fact that Stephen Puleo gave the molasses flood a number of human faces The majority of the book is narrative by and about the people involved in the flood The rest of the book is a chronicle of the time period A huge part of this book is about showing the world of the mid 1910s and into the twenties, spanning the anarchist and labor movements, World War I, the rise of big business, and prohibition Many of the quotes in Dark Tide resonate today on topics from white flight and xenophobia racism to the growing divide between the haves and the have nots I d highly recommend this book to anyone who d like to learnabout American history, uncommon disasters, corporate greed, Boston, or just an interesting read about human nature I read this from cover to cover and would highly suggest the paperback In it, the author shares a letter that a reader sent him from her step father It s some great stuff Anyone who had parents who grew up in Boston heard the story passed down about the great Molasses Flood It was usually told in an offhand manner, ending with on a hot day you can still smell the molasses This is the whole story, and there isn t anything offhand about it A very good piece of social, as well as labor history I, of course, ended up taking the book to the scene of the crime and retracing the steps Fascinating. #FREE BOOK Ì Dark Tide: The Great Boston Molasses Flood of 1919 Ä Around noon on January a group of firefighters was playing cards in Boston s North End when they heard a tremendous crash It was like roaring surf, one of them said later Like a runaway two horse team smashing through a fence, said another A third firefighter jumped up from his chair to look out a window Oh my God he shouted to the other men, Run Afoot tall steel tank filled withmillion gallons of molasses had just collapsed on Boston s waterfront, disgorging its contents as afoot high wave of molasses that at its outset traveled atmiles an hour It demolished wooden homes, even the brick fire station The number of dead wasn t known for days It would be years before a landmark court battle determined who was responsible for the disaster Did you ever hear of the great molasses flood in Boston I grew up hearing about this event probably because it took place in and around Boston s North End, and we had ties to and visited the North End frequently But even I took the reality of this event with a grain of salt But it actually happened Around noon on January 15th, 1919, a fifty foot tall tank FILLED with over 2 million gallons of thick, black molasses collapsed creating a massive tidal wave fifteen feet high, some say tha Did you ever hear of the great molasses flood in Boston I grew up hearing about this event probably because it took place in and around Boston s North End, and we had ties to and visited the North End frequently But even I took the reality of this event with a grain of salt But it actually happened Around noon on January 15th, 1919, a fifty foot tall tank FILLED with over 2 million gallons of thick, black molasses collapsed creating a massive tidal wave fifteen feet high, some say that traveled at a speed of over 35 miles per hour and transformed Boston s North End into a disaster area Twenty one people were killed, many animals were destroyed, and the injury and destruction left in its wake were devastating Dark Tide by Steven Puleo is a fascinating story not only of the tragic flood, but of the social and cultural drama that led up to the tragedy from the tank s construction in 1915 all the way through the inevitable lawsuit that followed Mr Puleo is an award winning newspaper reporter and his style is highly readable If you have never heard about the Great Molasses Flood and would appreciate a detailed look at Boston s history this is the book for you p 197 In a Memorial Day speech in the near future, Odgen Judge Hugh Ogden soldier lawyer who presided over the lawsuit against USIA with heroic impartiality would observe We have prospered We have sold goods at high prices We have accumulated the largest stock of gold any nation ever possessed, but have we done any than that Have we in our blindness gained the whole world and lost our own soul It was not to ensure material prosperity that our soldiers fought and diedthat the rel p 197 In a Memorial Day speech in the near future, Odgen Judge Hugh Ogden soldier lawyer who presided over the lawsuit against USIA with heroic impartiality would observe We have prospered We have sold goods at high prices We have accumulated the largest stock of gold any nation ever possessed, but have we done any than that Have we in our blindness gained the whole world and lost our own soul It was not to ensure material prosperity that our soldiers fought and diedthat the relations of capital and labor might be still further embitteredWe must administer our government upon the broadest and most humanitarian lines so that each citizen shall receive his full inheritance in good roads, good schools, adequate opportunities for higher education, hospital facilities, librariesand other institutions that are a public charge for the public good 1920s This fascinating book tells the story of one of the most bizarre disasters in our country s history In 1919, on the eve of Prohibition, a storage silo in Boston s North End was being filled with molasses which was about to be shipped off to be turned into alcohol In the cold of January the tank was half filled with nearly a million gallons of molasses The tank had been leaking for years Children from the neighborhood came daily with their buckets to collect the leaked molasses for their moth This fascinating book tells the story of one of the most bizarre disasters in our country s history In 1919, on the eve of Prohibition, a storage silo in Boston s North End was being filled with molasses which was about to be shipped off to be turned into alcohol In the cold of January the tank was half filled with nearly a million gallons of molasses The tank had been leaking for years Children from the neighborhood came daily with their buckets to collect the leaked molasses for their mothers to use in their cooking The watchman had complained often about the leaking and the solution the tank owners came up with was to paint the silo brown so the leaks weren t as noticeable On this particular morning a ship loaded with molasses had come up from Puerto Rico following the Gulf Stream and unloaded over a million gallons of warm molasses into the cold molasses The rumbling and grumbling inside the tank began as the warm molasses caused a chemical reaction with the cold The tank burst open flooding 2 million gallons of molasses through the Boston streets It knocked out an elevated train, wiped out a firehouse, killed 21 people, many horses and injured many.This story is so well told the lead up to the explosion, the catastrophe itself and the aftermath that it reads like novel Very, very well crafted book I was blown away by this, how could something this huge have happened and I didn t know It also made me wish I knew all history, every single interesting event that ever happened So, in 1919, there was a gigantic molasses flood in Boston, which is interesting enough Add in the political climate of the times, with anarchists in every doorway, a changing Federal climate, corporationsconcerned with profit than safety, and a bunch of hard working people doing their level best to keep their I was blown away by this, how could something this huge have happened and I didn t know It also made me wish I knew all history, every single interesting event that ever happened So, in 1919, there was a gigantic molasses flood in Boston, which is interesting enough Add in the political climate of the times, with anarchists in every doorway, a changing Federal climate, corporationsconcerned with profit than safety, and a bunch of hard working people doing their level best to keep their families afloat while the economy was in a slump and it s a lot like today, only with horses and steam engines Well written and fascinating but intermittently discursive in the interests of giving a complete picture of the era This book was great a nonfiction re the Great Molasses Spill in the North End in 1919 I had heard of the disaster in which 21 people lost their lives, hundreds were injured and multiple structures destroyed But, I had absolutely NO IDEA of the events tied in with the eventlike Sacco Vanzetti and the anarchist movement, World War I, the rum slavery molasses triangle trade Having connections in the North End helped keep me interested during the descriptions of the legal ramificatio This book was great a nonfiction re the Great Molasses Spill in the North End in 1919 I had heard of the disaster in which 21 people lost their lives, hundreds were injured and multiple structures destroyed But, I had absolutely NO IDEA of the events tied in with the eventlike Sacco Vanzetti and the anarchist movement, World War I, the rum slavery molasses triangle trade Having connections in the North End helped keep me interested during the descriptions of the legal ramifications in the mid end of the book I found it particularly interesting when the book described how the Italians were discriminated against, yet they insisted on keeping to members of their own community, didn t try to become citizens or learn the language This played a big part in the ability of the company to build the structure in the North End to begin with Unlike the Irish, the residents took no part in the city government, etc and thus were considered irrelevant Somehow, similar themes continue in society today Same dog, different fleas This historical event is yet another example of the truthiness of Hanlon s Razor Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity In this case, a cowardly middle manager with no relevant experience cuts corners to please his clueless bosses, constructing a huge, dangerous, leaky tower for molasses in a crowded slum He disregards direct pleas from people who work at the structure and feel that it is dangerous, insisting that he, the middle manager, knows better Howe This historical event is yet another example of the truthiness of Hanlon s Razor Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity In this case, a cowardly middle manager with no relevant experience cuts corners to please his clueless bosses, constructing a huge, dangerous, leaky tower for molasses in a crowded slum He disregards direct pleas from people who work at the structure and feel that it is dangerous, insisting that he, the middle manager, knows better However, the middle manager is sufficiently concerned to order the tower painted the color of molasses, so the extent of the leaking is not so obvious When disaster inevitably strikes and innocent also poor, foreign, powerless people are killed, the manager s organization goes into full spin control mode, wrapping itself in the flag and blaming shadowy foreign terrorists Insert your own rueful comment aboutrecent world events here Meanwhile, the organization acquires the services of the best lawyers and experts that money can buy, just in case.Descriptions of this incident often contain the word curious , because we re not used to thinking of molasses as being as dangerous as, say, water or fire Water looks harmless in the glass, and fire seems fairly friendly at the end of a match, but we ve all seen evidence of the power of these elements if you re fortunate, only on You Tube or in the movies The few souls who have witnessed a wall of molasses several stories tall devouring a whole neighborhood have passed away, so the rest of us are free today to envision molasses as a vaguely ridiculous gelatinous substance oozing harmlessly from a tiny jar So cute Not at all like a nightmare of brown sludge pounding down the city streets with the velocity of a speeding car, drowning people and pulverizing structures unfortunate enough to be in the wrong place at the wrong time One of the unlikely heroes in this book turns out to be Hugh Ogden, the Boston judge for the subsequent court case against the owners of the tank On first examination, he seems like the type who might be sympathetic to the foreign terrorist argument, meaning, he was a strict law and order patriot and veteran Lawyers for the owners attempted to appeal to Ogden s presumed political bias I speculate that Judge Ogden realized that getting at the truth of the case, even if it contradicted his political sympathies, was the best service he could do for his country This he did, finding for the families of those killed and injured I hope that his spirit continues to live on in judges today.Recommended in The Given Day by Dennis Lehane I liked, but not loved, this accessibly written book I had no idea that there had been such an event, and the thought of it was pretty horrific For all neo cons, this is what happens when industry and corporations are left to regulate themselves There is a reason for inspections and oversight of big business To think of the corners that were cut in the name of saving money and profit at the expense of lives is completely deplorable Also, the cost of the clean up must have been astronomical I liked, but not loved, this accessibly written book I had no idea that there had been such an event, and the thought of it was pretty horrific For all neo cons, this is what happens when industry and corporations are left to regulate themselves There is a reason for inspections and oversight of big business To think of the corners that were cut in the name of saving money and profit at the expense of lives is completely deplorable Also, the cost of the clean up must have been astronomical the corporation should have been charged for every penny So, why did I give it 3 and not 5 stars First, as a history this is really flawed Puleo continually gets into the heads of the people who were involved in this tragedy and imagines their thoughts, feelings, and otherwise makes attributions that are just that imagined That is not history it is historical fiction Second, as a historian, he should be a bitof a fact checker To cite one example, he talks about a victim whose hair turned white overnight as a result of the accident Heeeellllooo This is physiologically not possible It is a myth Hair is dead tissue, and while hair becomes white, what is already on your head does not Third, he moralizes and inserts his opinion a bit too much for a historian in my opinion He makes assertions regarding Italian Americans and their reluctance to organize, a stance that changes as a result of this tragedy While this may have been a tipping point to community organization, the world does not work quite this simply, and he should really have provided a citation or two to support this contention.While this was somewhat melodramatic historical fiction, it was by no means a history in the true sense of the word Read it for entertainment, but read with a big grain of salt