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Basing it a lot on family lore as handed down from his grandfather Joe Judge, Mark Gauvreau Judgehas written a fine book about that year the Washington Senators won it all Grandpa was the Senators first baseman for a dozen or so years during the Twenties and was an integral part of theteam Clark Griffith put together that won 3 pennants and one World Series.Until Griffith came the Senators in 1912 , the Washington Senators were pretty much a joke team Inthe American League or the National Leag Basing it a lot on family lore as handed down from his grandfather Joe Judge, Mark Gauvreau Judgehas written a fine book about that year the Washington Senators won it all Grandpa was the Senators first baseman for a dozen or so years during the Twenties and was an integral part of theteam Clark Griffith put together that won 3 pennants and one World Series.Until Griffith came the Senators in 1912 , the Washington Senators were pretty much a joke team Inthe American League or the National League they were perennially at the bottom Griffith inherited one real asset, a pitcher who may have been the greatest ever who had been plucked out of obscurityby the Senators to pitch and win with damn little behind him With the joke team he had the accomplishments of Walter Johnson are stunning even today 2nd Most wins lifetime 414, most shutouts 110 Johnson who threw with blinding speed with a loping motion that looked like it hadnothing on it Fooled most of the batters of the American League for 20 years.Griffith very slowly built the team around Johnson until the 20s when they actually contended forthe pennant Of course they were up against the new powerhouse in New York, the Yankees of Babe Ruth The Senators broke free in 1924 and went to the top that year.Oddly enough Johnson had a subpar year for him and many thought he was through Still a lot ofAmerica rooted for Johnson and the Senators to beat that other New York powerhouse, the Giants ofJohn McGraw who won their fourth straight National League pennant It went 7 games and it was an extra inning miracle that won it for the Senators in that 7th game with Johnson pitching I won t go into the detail, but little things can really make a difference.The Senators won in 1925 as well, but after building a 3 to 1 game lead in 4 games, they lost thelast 3 to the Pittsburgh Pirates They only won one other American League pennant in 1933 and itwas the New York Giants that beat them in the World Series in 5 games.Like his good friend and rival in Philadelphia Connie Mack, Clark Griffith was not a wealthy man and couldn t compete over the long haul with the Yankees that Jacob Ruppert built The Senatorsfell out of contention gradually and by the time Griffith died in 1955 they were once again prettymuch a joke The Senators played their last year in the nation s capital in 1960 and would move toMinneapolis St.Paul and become the Minnesota Twins Another Washington Senators team cameinto being the following year with the American League expansion But after 1971 those Senators left for the Dallas Fort Worth area to become the Texas Rangers.As for Joe Judge whose grandson wrote this story He was a pretty good first baseman, great defensively, better in the field than thewell known Lou Gehrig and Hank Greenberg Theyput up better power numbers But Judge was far better defensively He had a good career, butmissed that last Washington pennant winner.But his story and the rest of the team that brought the championship of baseball to Washington, DCis lovingly told by his grandson in this fine baseball book The author s grandfather played first base for the 1924 Nats team that won the World Series I had read most of the story previously in the Henry Thomas biography of Walter Johnson. What do you do with a non fiction book that is so emotionally satisfying, yet so fact challenged I guess you hope that it gets another edition emphasis on edit.I am a casual baseball fan a dilettante I love the game, but I m hardly a maven, much less a guru, much less a Nate Silver Yet even I could pick out rookie errors in this otherwise quick, narratively satisfying read.1 He called the NY American League team the New York Yankees in 1909 on page 34 they were the Highlanders then, a What do you do with a non fiction book that is so emotionally satisfying, yet so fact challenged I guess you hope that it gets another edition emphasis on edit.I am a casual baseball fan a dilettante I love the game, but I m hardly a maven, much less a guru, much less a Nate Silver Yet even I could pick out rookie errors in this otherwise quick, narratively satisfying read.1 He called the NY American League team the New York Yankees in 1909 on page 34 they were the Highlanders then, and would not become the Yankees until 1912 My bad Although the official nickname wouldn t be the Yankees until 1913, sports writers called them the Yankees as early as 1904.2 Clark Griffith, in the 1924 season, announced an increase in his stadium s seating to 36,000 3 pages later, we learn that he plans an increase without contradiction to 32,245.3 He mentions and describes a famous photo of Babe Ruth unconscious after knocking himself out on the right field fence chasing a Joe Judge fly ball looking dead with eyes closed and mouth open The book includes the photo Ruth s mouth is closed.4 Circa page 89 we learn of Walter Johnson s 107th career shutout in August 1924 He had a still standing record 110 shutouts all time 3 came in 1925, 2 in 1926, 1 in 1927 Ummm..5 On page 104 we learn that Ty Cobb batted.222 off Johnson until 1915, until he learned to crowd the plate, where apparently the nice Johnson was reticent to throw inside for fear of injuring somebody Then we learn that from 1915 to 1936 Cobb averaged.435 against the Big Train emphasis added While for all I know that s technically true, Johnson retired in 1927 and Cobb in 1928.6 On page 47, the famous death of Ray Chapman the guy struck in the head by a pitch in 1920 is alleged to have immediately led to the banning of all doctored pitches yet those regulations were already coming down by opening day 1920, clubs were limited to 2 spitball pitchers per squad, and then the regulations were further battened down following Chapman s death.That s just on a casual reading not looking for inaccuracies Still, the writing is strong enough and the subject matter unmined enough that I sincerely hope that another edition comes out with these and any other problems rectified There s a book out there called Baseball s Greatest Season 1924 that I d like to get my hands on, but the narrative strength of the book I read particularly the two chapters on the world series itself that I hope Mark Judge grandson of Senators first baseman Joe Judge sees his version corrected and reprinted Great story, but the poor writing and a couple of sloppy errors, such as confusing the Chicago White Stockings and Chicago White Sox took some of the fun out of it for me. |FREE PDF ♋ Damn Senators: My Grandfather and the Story of Washington’s Only World Series Championship ⚉ In Damn Senators, Mark Judge has written a book that is at once a touching memoir of his grandfather, star first baseman for the old Washington Senators a history of baseball in its golden age and an exciting account of the SenatorsWorld Series victory As one advance reader says, This book is not only for the dedicated fan but for anyone interested in human endurance and courage and the thrill of victory and the agony of defeat For decades, the Senators were the doormat of the American league, a disappointment to the presidents and ordinary people who flocked to Griffith Stadium to watch Walter Johnson, arguably the best pitcher of all time, Goose Goslin, one of the most feared hitters in baseball and another future Hall of Famer, and other great players labor year after year in vain But then ineverything unexpectedly came together Team owner Clark Griffith made shrewd off season deals for journeyman players who would have their best years The aging Johnson, whom some sportswriters said was finished, put together a final great season Bucky Harris, the Boy Wonder, managed with a shrewdness that confounded those who thought he was too young for the job And the author s grandfather, Joe Judge, the best fielding first baseman in the league and a lifetime hitter, anchored the team Damn Senators tells the dramatic story of how Washington managed to beat Babe Ruth and the Yankees, perennial champions of the American League, and then triumphed over the heavily favored New York Giants in what sports writers consider one of the most dramatic World Series in baseball history In recreating this championship season, the author interweaves the story of Judge, son of an Irish immigrant who became a baseball legend not only for his steady play he would eventually be inducted into RFK Stadium s Hall of Stars but also because of what came after his retirement In his later years, Judge was befriended by writer Douglas Wallop who made him the prototype for Joe Hardy, the lead character in his novel The Year the Yankees Lost the Pennant, later fabulously successful as a stage play and movie under the title Damn Yankees Recalling The Boys of Summer and other classics, Damn Senators is filled with unforgettable portraits of baseball legends like the wily Griffith the noble Big Train Johnson Ty Cobb, the meanest player of the day Al Schacht, The Clown Prince of Baseball whose comedy act played between innings the Giants Little Napoleon, John McGraw, and of course, the larger than life Babe Ruth Mark Judge returns us to a golden past But with a new baseball franchise rud to be on its way back to the nation s capitol, he may be taking us back to the future as well