|READ KINDLE ♬ Benang: From the Heart ♆ eBooks or Kindle ePUB free

I wrote this review back in 2002 when I read this book but have just posted it to my blog because I m currently reading the author s second book That Deadman Dancing and I thought other readers might be interested.I see this review as a bit naive now, but I m sharing it anyway because there don t seem to be any reviews of the book online and it s better than nothing I hope So, from my reading journal of September 2002, here it is This is a most interesting and challenging book, the sort of f I wrote this review back in 2002 when I read this book but have just posted it to my blog because I m currently reading the author s second book That Deadman Dancing and I thought other readers might be interested.I see this review as a bit naive now, but I m sharing it anyway because there don t seem to be any reviews of the book online and it s better than nothing I hope So, from my reading journal of September 2002, here it is This is a most interesting and challenging book, the sort of fiction that simmers in one s consciousness, changing one s view of long held ideas and assumptions.The prose is beautiful Oceanic, as the blurb tells us The lyricism enables us to see the landscape through different eyes the seas, the bush, the caves and rocks and creeks Better than Winton, I reckon, and aboutinteresting people than the self indulgent losers than Winton writes about.The Aborigines of Benang are certainly not losers The novel, a work of fiction, reads like an autobiography of a family since white settlement Scott, who might or might not be the narrator, seeks to explore his antecedents and the family history which has labelled him the first white man.To read the rest of this review please visit A story spanning generations of a Nyoongar family through white settlement Their treatment by whites, even whites who are family often through the routine rape of Aboriginal women is abhorrent Ern was a hideous character throughout And yet this story is muchabout identity, and how the young narrator Harley, born out of his white grandfather Ern s experiments to produce the first white man , ultimately finds his true place within his Nyoongar heritage I enjoyed this exploration of id A story spanning generations of a Nyoongar family through white settlement Their treatment by whites, even whites who are family often through the routine rape of Aboriginal women is abhorrent Ern was a hideous character throughout And yet this story is muchabout identity, and how the young narrator Harley, born out of his white grandfather Ern s experiments to produce the first white man , ultimately finds his true place within his Nyoongar heritage I enjoyed this exploration of identity, of the struggle to find our place when we may have lost chunks of ourselves along the way our culture, lost languages, separation from family I really enjoyed the way this was portrayed with Harley literally floating away it showed perfectly, beautifully, how it feels to be without an anchor of knowing and of feeling where you belong Beautiful prose another reviewer describes it as oceanic , and that s true, in terms of style but also in terms of structure The story was built like the tides drawing in and out, sometimes covering the same ground from a different angle, or adding slightlydetail each time the swell comes in While feeling organic and interesting, it also added some confusion in following the story Also adding to the confusion was keeping track of the numerous family members throughout the generations, and how they were all related Although I empathized with the characters, I never truly felt like I knew any of them except in a rather superficial manner Ern, perhaps the most fleshed out character, was also the most odious I would really like to have known at least a few of the other family members especially the narrator better Ultimately, I enjoyed it, but it didn t all come together as a whole quite as neatly or with as much impact as I would have liked, and I really just wanted to feelfor the characters and for the journey You know how some things are so complex that answers will only annoy you and insult many who knowno answers here and once I stopped struggling to understand who everyone was and what was happening I realised how this is the perfect book about assimilation, protection, dispossession, family, knowledge, settlement and everything else that a Nyoongar might want to tell you about southwestern australia Needless to say it s brutal and sad. superb novel of aboriginal experience in western southwestern Australia it is not pretty and i think we all know what happened, as it did in Georgia, Nevada, Idaho, Texas, Sonora, Bolivia, new guinea, why does this list go on and on i want to readby Kim Scott. I found this pretty hard going to start with, but the book grew on me over time What would have been hugely helpful was a family tree, but I realised as I read that I would be best off drawing one out myself, following the narrator s journey in discovering his ancestry.I enjoyed the aspects of magical realism, the wonderful picture painted of the Australian landscape, and the honesty of the story, told by an unreliable and damaged but earnest narrator I appreciated enjoyed is hardly the right I found this pretty hard going to start with, but the book grew on me over time What would have been hugely helpful was a family tree, but I realised as I read that I would be best off drawing one out myself, following the narrator s journey in discovering his ancestry.I enjoyed the aspects of magical realism, the wonderful picture painted of the Australian landscape, and the honesty of the story, told by an unreliable and damaged but earnest narrator I appreciated enjoyed is hardly the right word the inside look at the events of the colonial period, in all of its depressing racism, brutality, societal and environmental destruction 3.5 stars |READ KINDLE ☪ Benang: From the Heart ♀ Oceanic in its rhythms and understanding, brilliant in its use of language and image, moving in its largeness of spirit, compelling in its narrative scope and style, this intriguing journey is a celebration and lament of beginning and return, of obliteration and recovery, of silencing, and of powerful utterance Both tentative and daring, it speaks to the present and a possible future through stories, dreams, rhythms, songs, images and documents mobilized from the incompletely acknowledged and still dynamic past This book was extremely difficult to read Firstly, the subject matter is very confronting secondly, the book keeps jumping between time periods, making it hard to keep track, and lastly, the main character floats, as if gravity did not apply to him, which made it very difficult for me to assimilate the goings on as real. Neville argues that the breeding out of colour by careful control of part Aboriginal people where they lived, whom they married would ultimately lead to the day where we could forget there were Aborigines in Australia Could there be a bookessential to the reading lists of White Australia, who grew up under the exclusive singularity of the policy of the same name. Benang is a difficult read, as one would expect from a novel about the attempted genocide of Aboriginal people through biological absorption The matter of fact narration of the layers of tragedy only add to the grimness And yet there is also joy, survival and triumph Every word of this heartbreaking book is placed so deliberately and perfectly Scott s prose is a constant reminder that the past is the present, and is likely to be the future too.