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@Read Pdf ⚠ Animal Wise: The Thoughts and Emotions of Our Fellow Creatures ê Did you know that ants teach, earthworms make decisions, rats love to be tickled, and chimps grieve Did you know that some dogs have thousand word vocabularies and that birds practice songs in their sleep That crows improvise tools, blue jays plan ahead, and moths remember living as caterpillars Noted science writer Virginia Morell explores the frontiers of research on animal cognition and emotion, offering a surprising and moving exploration into the hearts and minds of wild and domesticated animalsAnimal Wise takes us on a dazzling odyssey into the inner world of animals, from ants to elephants to wolves, and from sharp shooting archerfish to pods of dolphins that rumble like rival street gangs Morell probes the moral and ethical dilemmas of recognizing that even lesser animals have cognitive abilities such as memory, feelings, personality, and self awareness traits that many in the twentieth century felt were unique to human beingsBy standing behaviorism on its head, Morell brings the world of nature brilliantly alive in a nuanced, deeply felt appreciation of the human animal bond, and she shares her admiration for the men and women who have simultaneously chipped away at what we think makes us distinctive while offering a glimpse of where our own abilities come from Fascinating and important, and also carefully written I m convinced that I want to be a vegetarian At the very least, I expect readers of this to come away with an appreciation thatresearch needs to be done, by scientists with less hubris, less need to feel superior to the rest of the animal kingdom.It s not a perfect book Some bits are repeated, and though there are notes, an index, and a bibliography, none serve to guide a reader to the better choices for further reading Nor is there Fascinating and important, and also carefully written I m convinced that I want to be a vegetarian At the very least, I expect readers of this to come away with an appreciation thatresearch needs to be done, by scientists with less hubris, less need to feel superior to the rest of the animal kingdom.It s not a perfect book Some bits are repeated, and though there are notes, an index, and a bibliography, none serve to guide a reader to the better choices for further reading Nor is there offered a clear working definition of different kinds of intelligence between the ants and fish in the first two chapters, and the known to be smart mammals in the last ones.I really like the chapter on dogs The hypothesis being explored by the researchers Morell focused on is that dogs and humans represent an unusual case of convergent evolution, because although dogs and humans have entirely different ancestors, we share numerous behaviors and traits particularly the desire to work together to accomplish a task Darwin himself proposed that Dogs may have lost in cunning yet they have progressed in certain moral qualities, such as affection, trust, worthiness, temper, and probably general intelligence But for the most part animal intelligence is different than human intelligence Not entirely, of course we re all Earthlings But sufficiently so that, for example, chimps zookeepers have to study what habitat toys chimps are interested in, because if they try to imagine what they, or their human children, would like, they d mostly guess wrong Instead, enlist the chimps as colleagues, much as some Japanese scientists do And what about clues we miss entirely It s true that we re starting to investigate echolocation, but consider A room full of laughing rats Their joyful chirps were ricocheting all around us, but we couldn t hear a bit of it If there was a moment that encapsulated all we don t know or miss about animals, for me, this surely was it Hidden in a footnote is this gem There was actually very little that was comparative about most comparative cognition labs in the past, one comparative animal psychologist told me Three animals were used rats, pigeons, and college sophos, preferably male Hmm In the past, eh Next time you read a psych book, check if the studies used older humans, or ones who did not go to college, or ones who live in a culture that does not value a college education, or even females I, personally, have noted plenty of extrapolation from college students to all humans even now.I also want to knowabout the work of someone I d never heard of before, Darwin s protege George John Romanes, who wrote Animal Intelligence Morell points out that he argued that because animals could learn, they must have minds the same argument that was used at the time to explain the existence of minds in humans Note that at the time Because of human hubris mostly male scientific academicians, it seems , until Jane Goodall almost untrained, and female animals and humans desperately needed to be seen as distinct from one another Even now the goalposts keep changing First only humans had language then using a board with symbols wasn t good enough, then not using full syntax wasn t good enough First only humans used tools, then only humans made tools, then tool making was defined as an instinctive behavior.Thanks to Alexander F Skutch for The Minds of Birds, Temple Grandin for Thinking in Pictures, Expanded Edition My Life with Autism, Irene M Pepperberg for Alex Me How a Scientist and a Parrot Discovered a Hidden World of Animal Intelligence and Formed a Deep Bond in the Process and Sy Montgomery for The Soul of an Octopus A Surprising Exploration into the Wonder of Consciousness, and other books by each of them, and other authors , today s readers and aspiring scientists can begin to get to know our fellow animals for who not what they are And maybe someday calling someone an animal will be noinsulting than calling someone black or gay or a girl I liked this book I do recommend it to others It begins with a brief history of how we have in the past viewed the cognition and emotions of animals, starting with Aristotle, moving ahead to the Stoics, then Ren Descartes, Voltaire, Darwin, the Behaviorists, Konrad Lorenz, Jane Goodall and showing how Donald Redfield Griffin in the 1970s opened up research into cognitive ethology Previously, research into how animals think and feel was quite simply not taken seriously It had only been on th I liked this book I do recommend it to others It begins with a brief history of how we have in the past viewed the cognition and emotions of animals, starting with Aristotle, moving ahead to the Stoics, then Ren Descartes, Voltaire, Darwin, the Behaviorists, Konrad Lorenz, Jane Goodall and showing how Donald Redfield Griffin in the 1970s opened up research into cognitive ethology Previously, research into how animals think and feel was quite simply not taken seriously It had only been on the level of Skinner s operant conditioning through the reinforcement of desired behaviors and the punishment of undesired ones After the brief history of animal cognition, we progress chapter by chapter from simple creatures tocomplex ones, from ants, archer fish, parrots, rats, elephants, dolphins, gorillas, chimpanzees to finally wolves and dogs Looking at specific studies, carried out in the late 20th century and the first decade of the 21st century, conclusions are drawn about the respective animals cognitive abilities, self awareness, personality traits and emotions The studies have been conducted in countries all over the world Japan, Hungary, Germany, Austria, Tanzania, the United States andThe author is a science writer, not a scientist This book grew from her writing in The National Geographic The book reads as an article in the magazine Terms are clearly defined It is well organized and easy to follow Due to our evolutionary background, there isthat makes us similar to than makes us different from other species It is just nonsense to think that humans alone think and feel This is the book s central thesis and what it shows It also gives examples of where our capabilities are not as good as in other species, and that there is strength in diversity It is time we open our eyes to both what species share and how we differ Why must we incessantly see ourselves at the top of a pinnacle with all other creatures below If we are made aware of and begin to appreciate the abilities and beauty of other creatures, perhaps then we can stop or at least decrease the mass extinction that is occurring today Crassly put, can we afford to lose what these creatures can teach us Perhaps you are wondering what I am so scared of losing I will give just one example Chimpanzees have an instantaneous flash memory MUCH better than humans They are shown a picture for just a teeny bit of a second, and they can remember and replicate it I followed the experiment and thought, gosh, I cannot do that, only to discover that no humans can do what they do As we discover other creatures abilities, they become beautiful in our eyes and we value them We must prevent further extinction OK, so why am I not giving thisstars It is well organized, intelligible and has an important message It covers modern day studies The simple answer is that I quite simply liked it, but don t feel I can say I liked it a lot It left my heart unmoved There is a spark that is missing Animals do think and they do share our emotions that is shown Yet, the evidence stays on a clinical level The reader does not get to know any one specific individual creature well there is no emotional connection When I read Beyond Words What Animals Think and Feel, I was so emotionally moved that I felt horrified at the thought of even stepping on a bug Such an emotional response just did not happen here The audiobook is wonderfully read by Kirsten Potter She does nothing wrong The speed and the clarity of the spoken words are perfect Oh my gosh I m going to get to read this sooner than I d thought because I just won my FIRST EVER FIRST READS GIVEAWAY HEE HEE HEE HEE HEE And this is a perfect first winner, too, because if it s here in time for Christmas, I can read it with my niece who is interested in animals and their thoughts and emotions I AM SO EXCITED Feb 2012 I have finished this book Thank you, First Reads, for making me a winner And now, my thoughts I had so much fun reading this I mean, first off, it s rea Oh my gosh I m going to get to read this sooner than I d thought because I just won my FIRST EVER FIRST READS GIVEAWAY HEE HEE HEE HEE HEE And this is a perfect first winner, too, because if it s here in time for Christmas, I can read it with my niece who is interested in animals and their thoughts and emotions I AM SO EXCITED Feb 2012 I have finished this book Thank you, First Reads, for making me a winner And now, my thoughts I had so much fun reading this I mean, first off, it s really nice to know that other people in the world do not scoff at the idea of animals being able to think I watch my cats all the time and wonder what schemes they re scheming, what dreams they re dreaming, what weird little kitty thoughts are happening in their heads because it seems so obvious to me that there IS something going on in there, somethingthan just prowling for mice and finding warm spots of sunshine.Another reviewer had mentioned she d known most of the information contained in the book because she watches nature shows on TV Well, I don t get any sort of television programming in my house so many of these stories were news to me Ok, I did know about elephants and chimpanzees bonobos other ape friends But many of the chapters were surprising and funwell, except the chapter about Alex That was not surprising or fun and it made me cry Still.I think one of the things that excited me most was that I was able to remember my own encounters with creatures while I was reading each chapter While reading about ants and I really hope the little ant symbol at the bottom of the first chapter page remains in the retail copy , I remembered that I had a friend ant named Cindy when I was little for a few weeks one summer, I d run out back every morning and lie on my stomach next to Cindy s ant hill and would call for her The first ant that came out would stand and look at me and I knew she was my friend Cindy It made sense when I was four It doesn t, now, but I had just assumed this little black ant lived in a family similar to mine and wanted to play with me every day, would leave her breakfast table and come running to see me when I called at her front door I loved remembering that as much as I loved reading about little colored dots on tiny, busy ants.I also remember playing tag with a funny little fish in Greece I was kneeling in the water, looking for perfect rocks and this fish, a minnow maybe about the size of my pinky, came darting up between my thighs It wasn t looking for caves so don t even go there Anyhow, I moved to get a better look and it darted away I put my hand toward it and it swam just out of reach but it stayed, looking at me I sat back up and it darted back in I made to grab it and it darted out of reach We did this for a minute, or so, back and forth, and I swear it was giggling Then it darted off, stopped and looked at me, then swam away I don t know what that was but I like to think we were both having fun And that is what made me believe that archerfish shoot people in the eye because it s funny I do think animals think and feel I also think they have a sense of humor, that they can be sad, that they can be upset I ve never agreed based on nothingthan being around animals that humans are the only ones who can do all these things that supposedly make us human Thus, I enjoyed nearly every single story in this book because it made me hope thatandpeople will begin to feel the same that animals aren t just automatons but are thinking, feeling beings.Yes, I said nearly every single story because the one that did not strike me, though I think I was most excited to read it, was the chapter on ticklish rats For some reason, that one chapter didn t resonate with me, which is odd because I am delighted with the idea of tickling rats I want to find some rats to tickle right now.My copy is an uncorrected proof I expect several of the little things, aside from typos and the like, will be corrected before the book is finalized and sent to shelf so I won t go into that.I look very forward to sharing this with my niece I think she ll enjoy it as much as I did I would highly recommend this to anyone who is fascinated by animals, by psychology, by zoology, or just the overall bigger life picture I would not recommend it to that guy who told me that cats and dogs don t truly feel affection, that they re just asking for something or working on instinct because I don t think he d enjoy this book at all Here is a book everyone should read It deals with such an important subject, and too many of us are unaware of it Probably, MOST of us are unaware of it.Virginia Morell, author of ANIMAL WISE, says that animals have minds They use their brains as we do, and, like us, they have personalities, moods, and emotions They laugh and play Some show grief and empathy.It is true that most of us pet owners see intelligence and personality in our own animals But this isthan a proclamation by som Here is a book everyone should read It deals with such an important subject, and too many of us are unaware of it Probably, MOST of us are unaware of it.Virginia Morell, author of ANIMAL WISE, says that animals have minds They use their brains as we do, and, like us, they have personalities, moods, and emotions They laugh and play Some show grief and empathy.It is true that most of us pet owners see intelligence and personality in our own animals But this isthan a proclamation by someone who loves her pets Morell speaks scientific fact, first in a cover article in NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC, now expanded in ANIMAL WISE She tells us how we know that domesticated and wild animals, such as chimpanzees, elephants, wolves, and even fish, live bythan instinct.Morell knows and wants us all to know animals have feelings, both psychological and physical But most of us don t realize that because the scientific experiments and findings that prove this have happened mostly in relatively recent years, the 1990s But, even then and now, other animal experts are telling us to beware of anthropomorphism, attributing human emotions to animals They need to see the proof to believe it.The ANIMAL WISE epilogue gives examples to show why we need to know that animals as well as humans have minds and emotions Then how could we not take care of animals and know that to do otherwise is immoral So read ANIMAL WISE Then you will notice that,and , this subject is discussed elsewhere, too Places like PBS stations and the Discovery channel are getting the word out so that even nonreaders of scientific magazines will see the proof.Thanks to readitforward.com for this galley of ANIMAL WISE